Flooding

AP Photo

As widespread clean-up and repairs begin to take shape in Northeastern Oklahoma, after the recent flood event -- the second "500-year flood" to occur in our community in 32 years, by the way -- many of us are wondering what needs to be done, in both the short and long term, to fix the levee system. Our guests are Tulsa County Commissioner Karen Keith and District 12 Levee Commissioner Todd  Kilpatrick, both of whom worked closely during the recent crisis with the Army Corps of Engineers, the National Guard, and an array of federal, state, and local officials.

Our guest is the California-based seismologist, Dr. Lucy Jones, whose new book is "The Big Ones." It offers a bracing look at some of the history's greatest natural disasters, world-altering events whose reverberations we continue to feel today. At Pompeii, for example, Dr. Jones explores how a volcanic eruption in the first century AD challenged prevailing views of religion. Later in the book, she examines the California floods of 1862 and how they show that memory itself can change or fade over successive generations.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Ken Wolgemuth, an adjunct professor in the Dept. of Geosciences at the University of Tulsa who also works as a petroleum consultant. Dr. Wolgemuth is a devout Christian, as he tells us today, yet he's also very much a man of science. He's also one of the contributors to a new geology text that focuses attention on an ongoing debate within America's evangelical and conservative Christian communities, the age of the earth.

Bird Creek spills from its banks

Mar 20, 2012
Jarrod Wyatt

The National Weather Service in Tulsa has issued a

* Flood warning for

  The bird Creek near Owasso.

* from this morning to late Wednesday night...or until the warning is

  cancelled.

* at  100 am Tuesday the stage was 11.95 feet.

* flood stage is 18.0 feet.

* moderate flooding is forecast.

* Forecast...The Bird Creek near Owasso is expected to rise

  above flood stage this morning and continue to rise to near 23.6

  feet by Wednesday before dawn. The river is expected to fall below