Food Critics

On this edition of ST, we're talking about food, glorious food -- and in particular, American food. What does the phrase "American cuisine" actually refer to? And what do we mean when we say that a certain dish has been "Americanized"? Is there a national menu that we all share in this vast nation? And what will food in the USA be like in the future?

(Note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is Emily Contois, Assistant Professor of Media Studies here at The University of Tulsa. Her recently published book, which she tells us about, is "Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." It is, per Library Journal, "a fascinating work of cultural studies that makes evident the continued power and threat of explicitly gendered food production and consumption in the 21st century.

Our guest is Emily Contois, Assistant Professor of Media Studies here at The University of Tulsa. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." It is, per Library Journal, "a fascinating work of cultural studies that makes evident the continued power and threat of explicitly gendered food production and consumption in the 21st century. [This book is] recommended broadly for students and scholars of fields related to gender, culture, and consumption." And please note that Prof.

Our guest on ST is Harold McGee, who writes about the science of food and cooking. His earlier books include "On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen" and "Keys to Good Cooking: A Guide to Making the Best of Foods and Recipes." He joins us to discuss his new book, "Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells." As was noted of this work by Booklist: "In his detailed survey of scents, food writer and cooking scientist McGee elegantly explains olfaction....