The Future

Our guest on ST is Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, a professor of internet governance and regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. He's also a faculty affiliate of the Belfer Center of Science and International Affairs at Harvard. Mayer-Schönberger joins us to talk about "Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil," a new book for which he's a co-author.

The well-regarded historian Niall Ferguson is our guest; his many books include "Civilization," "The Great Degeneration," and "The Ascent of Money." He joins us to discuss his newest book, "Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe," which seems especially timely in the wake of the annus horribilis that was 2020. Ferguson's book sets out to show why human beings are getting worse, not better, at handling disasters -- despite advancements in medicine, science, technology, etc.

Our guest is Vaclav Smil, a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Manitoba. Smil is the author of 40+ books on topics like energy, environmental and population change, food production and nutrition, technical innovation, risk asssessment, and public policy. He joins us to discuss his accessible and compelling new book of short essays, "Numbers Don't Lie." It's an eclectic, statistics-driven volume that effectively shows how numbers reveal the true state of our world today -- and how such numbers, much like unalterable facts, are what matter most.

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Our guest on ST is Bina Venkataraman, a journalist and former adviser in the Obama administration who has helped communities and businesses prepare for climate change. She tells us about her book, "The Optimist's Telescope," which is now out in paperback. This work explores why we as human beings tend NOT to think ahead -- and what can be done to change that.

Our guest is Zach St. George, a science reporter who has written for The Atlantic, Scientific American, and Outside, among other publications. He joins us to discuss his new book, "The Journeys of Trees: A Story about Forests, People, and the Future." The book offers an up-close examination of forest migration, and moreover presents a sort of "group portrait" of the people studying the forests of the past, those protecting the forests of the present, and those planting the forests of the future.

Our guest is Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, whose new book is a primer on world history -- specifically, world history as it's understood in our current global era. As the COVID-19 pandemic has made all too clear, we live in an age when things happening thousands of miles away can directly (and drastically) affect our own lives. As Haass explains on StudioTulsa, he wrote this book in order to help readers of all backgrounds make sense of this complicated, interconnected, crisis-laden world.

Our guest is Terence Hawkins, whose second novel, "American Neolithic," was named a Kirkus Reviews Best of 2014. In a starred review, some five years ago, Kirkus called it "a towering work of speculative fiction." This book is now appearing in a revised, newly re-published edition, and Hawkins tells us about it on ST today. As the bestselling novelist Tom Perrotta has noted of this work: "A one-of-a-kind novel, a bizarre but gripping amalgam of anthropology, political diatribe, and speculative science fiction....

Next week here at TU -- on October 11th, in a free-to-the-public event at the Lorton Performance Center -- the University's College of Engineering and Natural Sciences will present energy and power-system expert Robert Bryce, who will give the 2019 Hulings Lecture. This lecture will be followed by a screening of Bryce's film, "Juice: How Electricity Explains the World." (More on this event is posted here.) Bryce is our guest today.

Our guest is the gardening expert Benjamin Vogt, who grew up in Oklahoma and Minnesota and is now based in Nebraska, and who is also the author of "A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future." Vogt will deliver the keynote address at a day-long gathering happening in OKC on Wednesday the 28th called "Rewilding Oklahoma: A Symposium for People, Places, and Pollinators." This event will highlight statewide successes in pollinator conservation, and you can learn more about it here.

(Note: This interview first aired back in March.) Our guest is the well-known hacker, inventor, entrepreneur, and technology futurist, Pablos Holman. An internationally recognized expert in 3D printing, artificial intelligence, big data, robotics, automated manufacturing, and cryptocurrency, Holman has contributed to our vision of tomorrow in a way that few others have. At The Intellectual Ventures Lab, he's worked on a brain-surgery tool, a machine to suppress hurricanes, 3D food printers, and a laser that can shoot down mosquitos (in order to help eradicate malaria).

Our guest is the well-known hacker, inventor, entrepreneur, and technology futurist, Pablos Holman. An internationally recognized expert in 3D printing, artificial intelligence, big data, robotics, automated manufacturing, and cryptocurrency, Holman has contributed to our vision of tomorrow in a way that few others have. At The Intellectual Ventures Lab, he's worked on a brain-surgery tool, a machine to suppress hurricanes, 3D food printers, and a laser that can shoot down mosquitos (in order to help eradicate malaria).

Our guest on StudioTulsa is a Wharton professor and tech entrepreneur whose new book examines how algorithms and artificial intelligence are starting to run just about every single aspect of our lives.

"The key to the work up to this point" by Hilma af Klint (1907)

On this episode of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast. (The podcast, now in its second season, is co-created twice a month by our own Scott Gregory and Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum.) This time out, MC learns about a special, much-discussed exhibition now on view at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. It's a remarkable series of works by the obscure yet visionary Swedish artist Hilma af Klint (1862-1944). The exhibit is titled "Paintings for the Future" and closes April 23rd.

Our guest is the former long-serving Mayor of Oklahoma City, Mick Cornett, who joins us to discuss his new book, "The Next American City: The Big Promise of Our Midsize Metros." The book offers a hopeful and detailed look at the many dynamic urban centers that will serve as (according to Cornett) active and rapidly evolving focal points for the United States in the coming years. In cities like Oklahoma City, Indianapolis, Charleston, and Des Moines, Cornett sees urban settings of relatively modest size but truly outsized accomplishment. They (and other U.S.

(Please note: This show first aired back in December.) Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen?

If our machines are getting smarter and smarter, and if they are doing more and more work, then what happens to the, well, human facet of the workplace? On this installment of ST, we listen back to an interview from July. At that time, we spoke with Edward D.

Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen? On this edition of ST, we're talking about various AI-related matters with Amir Husain, an inventor and computer scientist whose new book is called "The Sentient Machine: The Coming Age of Artificial Intelligence." As was noted of this book by Prof.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Daniel Wilson, the bestselling sci-fi writer and Tulsa native (and TU alum) whose new novel, just out, is called "The Clockwork Dynasty." (Please note that Wilson will soon be reading from this book, and signing copies of it, at a Book Smart Tulsa event here in our community.) As was noted of this novel in The Los Angeles Review of Books: "Wilson is one of the foremost prophets of the near future.... In 'The Clockwork Dynasty,' the irrepressibly readable Wilson has retreated to pseudo-vampiric sentient robots.

On this edition of our show, an interesting if rather unsettling discussion with Edward D. Hess, who is a co-author of the newly released book, "Humility Is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age." As was noted of this volume in a detailed appreciation posted at the online San Francisco Review of Books: "What will be the percentage of jobs that technology will replace in the United States during the next two decades? Estimates vary but not that much. There seems to be a consensus: a range of 45 to 50% between now and 2037.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) Is technology taking over and/or fundamentally changing and/or worsening our lives? It's a debatable question...or series of questions...but, for whatever it's worth, there ARE more and more books and novels and TV shows these days in which technological devices are taking over, changing, or even, yes, worsening our lives as human beings.

Is technology taking over and/or fundamentally changing and/or worsening our lives? It's a debatable question...or series of questions...but, for whatever it's worth, there do seem to be more and more books and novels and TV shows these days in which technological devices are taking over, fundamentally changing, or even, yes, worsening our lives as human beings.

(Please note: This show first aired last November.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

On this edition of ST, an interesting, big-ideas-driven conversation with Dr. Jim Norwine, the Regents Professor Emeritus of Geography at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. Dr. Norwine is the editor of a textbook called "A World after Climate Change and Culture-Shift" from Springer Publishers. It's a collection of essays that's described like so at the Springer website: "An international team of environmental and social scientists explain two powerful current change-engines and how their effects, and our responses to them, will transform Earth and humankind into the 22nd-century....

(Please note: This program originally aired in September of last year.) On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.

On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.