Geopolitics

The well-regarded historian Niall Ferguson is our guest; his many books include "Civilization," "The Great Degeneration," and "The Ascent of Money." He joins us to discuss his newest book, "Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe," which seems especially timely in the wake of the annus horribilis that was 2020. Ferguson's book sets out to show why human beings are getting worse, not better, at handling disasters -- despite advancements in medicine, science, technology, etc.

PHOTO BY THE INDEPENDENT (UK)

Following a recent coup attempt, more than 100,000 people were arrested and dismissed from their jobs in the Republic of Turkey. Turkey is also the world's largest jailer of journalists; 300+ are now behind bars. Our guest is an expert on these and related matters: Vonya Womack teaches at Cabrini University in Pennsylvania and spoke recently at the Raindrop Turkish House in Broken Arrow, OK. She spoke about her work as a human rights activist and about how she recently visited with Turkish political refugees in Greece. She tells us about these adventures on StudioTulsa.

PHOTO BY EUROPEAN COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

The Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations recently presented an evening focused on Russia-China relations, and what the increasing ties between these two nations might mean for the United States. Our guest participated in that evening: Nina Rozhanovskaya has 7+ years of experience working on international academic projects and facilitating cooperation among Russian organizations and their overseas partners in a variety of areas. She is a coordinator and academic liaison for Kennan Institute in Russia.

Has the Trump Administration strengthened our nation's position on the global stage -- or are we now, as a country, weaker in terms of international geopolitics? On this broadcast of ST, we welcome James Lindsay, Senior Vice President at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he oversees the work of the more than six dozen fellows in the David Rockefeller Studies Program. Lindsay is considered a leading authority on the American foreign policy-making process and on the domestic politics of U.S. foreign policy.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or NATO, is a multi-government military alliance between 29 North American and European countries. It began with 12 countries, and it will soon turn 70 years old. What is the future of NATO? (Especially at a time when the U.S. President has openly and publicly questioned the very importance of NATO....) What are NATO's main aims or goals -- and how have these changed over the years? Our guest on ST is Steven Hill, who was appointed the Legal Adviser and Director of the Office of Legal Affairs at NATO Headquarters in Brussels in February of 2014.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Ted Bromund, a Senior Research Fellow at The Heritage Foundation who specializes in Anglo-American relations, U.S. and British relations with Europe and the European Union, America’s leadership role in the world, and international organizations and treaties. A columnist for Newsday, Forbes, and Great Britain's Yorkshire Post, Bromund also writes regularly for National Review, The Weekly Standard, and FoxNews.com.

Photo by The Washinton Times

On this edition of ST, we speak with Robert Donaldson, Trustees Professor of Political Science (Emeritus) at The University of Tulsa. A former President of TU, Donaldson is also an expert on international politics, especially Soviet, Russian, and American foreign policies.

The earth's climate has warmed significantly since the late 19th century, and the activities of humankind -- primarily greenhouse-gas emissions -- are the main cause behind this warming. Such is the consensus view of the world's climate scientists. On today's ST, we explore the issue of climate change with a noted **political** scientist. Joshua Busby is an Associate Professor of Public Affairs and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas.

We chat with Ian Shapiro, the Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. He's the co-author of a new book, "Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy from Itself," which he tells us about. The book engagingly explores why and how the form of government known as democracy has -- quite strangely and paradoxically -- reduced if not eradicated trust in political systems worldwide.

What happens when one of the world's most oil-wealthy nations becomes a failed state? Our guest is Ambassador Patrick Duddy, the director of Duke University's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies who also teaches at the Sanford School of Public Policy. Before arriving at Duke, Ambassador Duddy served as a U.S. diplomat for nearly 30 years; upon his retirement, he was one of the State Department's most senior Latin American specialists.

Our guest on ST is David Shambaugh, the Director of the China Policy Program at George Washington University.