Global Affairs

PHOTO BY CNN.COM

Our guest is Dr. Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Professor at the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR) titled "The U.S. and the Middle East: Making Sense of Oil, Regime Change, and Forever Wars." Dr. Landis also writes "Syria Comment," a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts 100,000 readers per month -- and he often consults with U.S.

PHOTO BY THE INDEPENDENT (UK)

Following a recent coup attempt, more than 100,000 people were arrested and dismissed from their jobs in the Republic of Turkey. Turkey is also the world's largest jailer of journalists; 300+ are now behind bars. Our guest is an expert on these and related matters: Vonya Womack teaches at Cabrini University in Pennsylvania and spoke recently at the Raindrop Turkish House in Broken Arrow, OK. She spoke about her work as a human rights activist and about how she recently visited with Turkish political refugees in Greece. She tells us about these adventures on StudioTulsa.

PHOTO BY EUROPEAN COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

The Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations recently presented an evening focused on Russia-China relations, and what the increasing ties between these two nations might mean for the United States. Our guest participated in that evening: Nina Rozhanovskaya has 7+ years of experience working on international academic projects and facilitating cooperation among Russian organizations and their overseas partners in a variety of areas. She is a coordinator and academic liaison for Kennan Institute in Russia.

Our guest is the former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Samantha Power, who's widely known as a tireless human-rights advocate. She joins us to discuss her recently published memoir, "The Education of an Idealist." Later this month, on Tuesday the 29th, Ambassador Power will take part in an onstage conversation (and subsequent book signing) with Dr. John Schumann, President of OU-Tulsa, at Congregation B'nai Emunah.

Our guest is Tanvi Madan, a Senior Fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy in the Foreign Policy Program -- and also the Director of The India Project -- at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Her work centers upon India's role in the world and its foreign policy, focusing especially on the subcontinent's relations with China and the US. Madan recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, the title of which referred to Narendra Modi, who's been the Prime Minister of India since 2014.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization plays a much different role in the world today than it did when it was originally established in 1949. But what exactly is the role of NATO now? Our guest is Dr. Rajan Menon, Professor of International Relations at the City College of New York. He was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, where he spoke on "NATO Goes Global: A Look at the Record." Dr. Menon has been a Fellow at the Carnegie Council on Ethics in International Affairs and at the New America Foundation.

Our guest is Larry Diamond, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is also a past director of Stanford's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Diamond joins us to discus his new book, "Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency." As was noted by Gary J. Bass in The New York Times Book Review: "[Diamond] has spent 40 years circumnavigating the globe promoting democracy in Nigeria, Venezuela, and some 70 other countries. Yet today he is aghast....

Our guest is James F. Hollifield, a Professor of Political Science and Academic Director of the Tower Center at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas, Texas; he's also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (TCFR) titled "Back to the Future: Trump's Migration Policies and the New Nativism." Dr.

Has the long-standing, bi-partisan, and rather rarified U.S. foreign policy establishment effectively failed our country? Yes, according to our guest today: Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago, and he's now a contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine. Walt's latest book is "The Hell of Good Intentions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S.

Has the Trump Administration strengthened our nation's position on the global stage -- or are we now, as a country, weaker in terms of international geopolitics? On this broadcast of ST, we welcome James Lindsay, Senior Vice President at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he oversees the work of the more than six dozen fellows in the David Rockefeller Studies Program. Lindsay is considered a leading authority on the American foreign policy-making process and on the domestic politics of U.S. foreign policy.

Our guest is Dr. Mike Troilo, the Wellspring Associate Professor of International Business here at TU. He tells us how learning Korean -- which he began while taking karate lessons as a kid -- eventually led him to do graduate work in business administration and East Asian studies, which in turn led to his learning Mandarin Chinese. Dr. Troilo also describes his ongoing research into the policies as well as practices that can best foster entrepreneurship in a variety of nations, including China.

Faculty and fellows participating in the HEAL Initiative in Hinche, Haiti. (UC-San Francisco)

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of global health -- that is, thinking about the health and well-being of the world's populations in a global context, and moreover, about how to serve those populations by improving care (and achieving equity of care) for all people. It's about seeing health care as a basic human right, and thus as something that people all over the world are fully entitled to. Our guest is Dr. Phuoc Le of the University of California at San Francisco, who also teaches in the public health program at UC-Berkeley. Dr.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or NATO, is a multi-government military alliance between 29 North American and European countries. It began with 12 countries, and it will soon turn 70 years old. What is the future of NATO? (Especially at a time when the U.S. President has openly and publicly questioned the very importance of NATO....) What are NATO's main aims or goals -- and how have these changed over the years? Our guest on ST is Steven Hill, who was appointed the Legal Adviser and Director of the Office of Legal Affairs at NATO Headquarters in Brussels in February of 2014.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Ted Bromund, a Senior Research Fellow at The Heritage Foundation who specializes in Anglo-American relations, U.S. and British relations with Europe and the European Union, America’s leadership role in the world, and international organizations and treaties. A columnist for Newsday, Forbes, and Great Britain's Yorkshire Post, Bromund also writes regularly for National Review, The Weekly Standard, and FoxNews.com.

Photo by The Washinton Times

On this edition of ST, we speak with Robert Donaldson, Trustees Professor of Political Science (Emeritus) at The University of Tulsa. A former President of TU, Donaldson is also an expert on international politics, especially Soviet, Russian, and American foreign policies.

The earth's climate has warmed significantly since the late 19th century, and the activities of humankind -- primarily greenhouse-gas emissions -- are the main cause behind this warming. Such is the consensus view of the world's climate scientists. On today's ST, we explore the issue of climate change with a noted **political** scientist. Joshua Busby is an Associate Professor of Public Affairs and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

Our guest is Wendy Sherman, a Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and a former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. Ambassador Sherman is also a Senior Fellow at Harvard's Belfer Center and is a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and the Aspen Strategy Group. She was also a Chief Negotiator for the Iran Nuclear Deal; her newly published memoir is called "Not for the Faint of Heart: Lessons in Courage, Power, and Persistence." She was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

Our guest is Edith Chapin, the Executive Editor of NPR News, who is currently visiting the Tulsa community. Before joining NPR in 2012, she spent 25 years at CNN, working as an intern, then as a bureau chief, and finally as a vice president. Please note that Chapin will take part in a special Public Radio Tulsa "Give & Take" event tonight, the 12th, in the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus.

What happens when one of the world's most oil-wealthy nations becomes a failed state? Our guest is Ambassador Patrick Duddy, the director of Duke University's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies who also teaches at the Sanford School of Public Policy. Before arriving at Duke, Ambassador Duddy served as a U.S. diplomat for nearly 30 years; upon his retirement, he was one of the State Department's most senior Latin American specialists.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa has written a comprehensive account of the financial crisis of 2008, covering how its roots that go back decades -- and how it spawned further economic and political crises in the years since, from Brexit and the Euro-crisis in Greece, to the conflict in Ukraine, and the rise of economic nationalism in the U.S. and throughout Europe. Adam Tooze is a Professor of History at Columbia University and author of "The Deluge" and "The Wages of Destruction," both award-winning economic histories.

Now that it's been a week since the unprecedented (and, by many accounts, quite surreal) summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un in Singapore, what are the main "takeaways" from that event? What did we learn? And what -- if anything -- did each individual actually gain or achieve? And what happens next? Our guest is Scott Snyder, a senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Since the end of World War II, the Atlantic Alliance between the countries of Western Europe and the United States has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Despite various strains over the years, my guest today has said: "We've always argued about the 'means,' not the 'ends,' of policy. Now we seem to want very different end results." He was referring in this comment to the Trump Administration's decision to withdraw from the Iranian nuclear deal, despite near-unanimous European opposition.

Our guest is the California-based seismologist, Dr. Lucy Jones, whose new book is "The Big Ones." It offers a bracing look at some of the history's greatest natural disasters, world-altering events whose reverberations we continue to feel today. At Pompeii, for example, Dr. Jones explores how a volcanic eruption in the first century AD challenged prevailing views of religion. Later in the book, she examines the California floods of 1862 and how they show that memory itself can change or fade over successive generations.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Ambassador Husain Haqqani, who served as Pakistan's ambassador to the United States from 2008 to 2011. Now working as a Hudson Institute Senior Fellow, where he is also the Director for South and Central Asia, Haqqani is widely credited with managing a difficult American-Pakistani partnership during a critical phase in the global war on terrorism. He has, moreover, served as an advisor to four different Pakistani Prime Ministers; he is also co-editor of the journal Current Trends in Islamist Ideology.

Our guest on ST is the Right Honourable Henry McLeish, a former professional football player, who began his political career in Fife, Scotland, in the early 1970s. He was later elected to the United Kingdom Parliament (in 1987) and then became a member of the Blair Government (in 1997). McLeish became First Minister of Scotland in 2000, taking responsibility for Scotland's emerging role on the European as well as the World stage, leading official government missions internationally, and implementing Scotland's social and economic policies.

Our guest today is Lee Gordon, the 2018 Laureate of the Brock Prize in Education. Gordon is the founder of Hand in Hand: The Center for Jewish-Arab Education in Israel. This Israeli non-profit organization has created a network of integrated, bi-lingual public schools serving Arab and Jewish children alike. Starting with just 50 students in 1998, as we learn on today's StudioTulsa, Hand in Hand by now has six campuses. It also has, more to the point, some 1,600 or so students who belive in Jewish-Arab partnership and coexistence.

Our guest on ST is David Shambaugh, the Director of the China Policy Program at George Washington University.

On this edition of ST, an in-depth chat about President Donald Trump and the Middle East. Our guest is Daniel Benaim, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (where he researches U.S. policy in the Middle East) as well as a visiting lecturer at New York University. He's also been a foreign-policy speechwriter at the White House, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Senate.

Our guest is Helen Thorpe, a Denver-based journalist and author whose newest book, just out, is called "The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom." As noted of this work in a starred review from Publishers Weekly: "The latest work of narrative nonfiction from Thorpe ('Soldier Girls') brings readers face to face with the global refugee crisis through the story of a Denver English-acquisition class composed of teenage refugees from all over the world.

Pages