Global Warming

Yes, the climate is warming, and yes, we human beings are causing this warming. And yes, things look very bad. But what can be done...and what can **we** do...right now? Our guest has some answers; she is Dr. Kimberly Nicholas, Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at the well-regarded Lund University in Sweden.

The well-regarded historian Niall Ferguson is our guest; his many books include "Civilization," "The Great Degeneration," and "The Ascent of Money." He joins us to discuss his newest book, "Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe," which seems especially timely in the wake of the annus horribilis that was 2020. Ferguson's book sets out to show why human beings are getting worse, not better, at handling disasters -- despite advancements in medicine, science, technology, etc.

Yes, the climate is warming, and yes, we human beings are causing this warming. And yes, things look very bad. But what can be done...and what can **we** do...right now? Our guest has some answers; she is Dr. Kimberly Nicholas, Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at the well-regarded Lund University in Sweden. Born and raised on a vineyard in Sonoma, California, Nicholas studied the effect of climate change on the California wine industry for her PhD at Stanford.

U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee

A top official at the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality testified before a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday that climate change threatens water system infrastructure across the country. 

Our guest on ST is Bina Venkataraman, a journalist and former adviser in the Obama administration who has helped communities and businesses prepare for climate change. She tells us about her book, "The Optimist's Telescope," which is now out in paperback. This work explores why we as human beings tend NOT to think ahead -- and what can be done to change that.

Our guest is Zach St. George, a science reporter who has written for The Atlantic, Scientific American, and Outside, among other publications. He joins us to discuss his new book, "The Journeys of Trees: A Story about Forests, People, and the Future." The book offers an up-close examination of forest migration, and moreover presents a sort of "group portrait" of the people studying the forests of the past, those protecting the forests of the present, and those planting the forests of the future.

We welcome to our show Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a physician, epidemiologist, public health expert, and progressive activist. He was appointed health director of Detroit, Michigan, at age 30, and he was formerly a professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. El-Sayed's new book, which he tells us about, is "Healing Politics: A Doctor's Journey into the Heart of Our Political Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Bill McKibben with 350.org: "This is a very important book.

Our guest is the gardening expert Benjamin Vogt, who grew up in Oklahoma and Minnesota and is now based in Nebraska, and who is also the author of "A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future." Vogt will deliver the keynote address at a day-long gathering happening in OKC on Wednesday the 28th called "Rewilding Oklahoma: A Symposium for People, Places, and Pollinators." This event will highlight statewide successes in pollinator conservation, and you can learn more about it here.

The earth's climate has warmed significantly since the late 19th century, and the activities of humankind -- primarily greenhouse-gas emissions -- are the main cause behind this warming. Such is the consensus view of the world's climate scientists. On today's ST, we explore the issue of climate change with a noted **political** scientist. Joshua Busby is an Associate Professor of Public Affairs and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas.

Our guest is the California-based seismologist, Dr. Lucy Jones, whose new book is "The Big Ones." It offers a bracing look at some of the history's greatest natural disasters, world-altering events whose reverberations we continue to feel today. At Pompeii, for example, Dr. Jones explores how a volcanic eruption in the first century AD challenged prevailing views of religion. Later in the book, she examines the California floods of 1862 and how they show that memory itself can change or fade over successive generations.

(Please note: This show first aired last November.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Sandra Postel, a well-respected expert on freshwater conservation who's also the founder of the Global Water Policy Project. She co-created Change the Course, a national freshwater conservation and restoration campaign, and in 2010, she was appointed a Freshwater Fellow of the National Geographic Society, where she still serves as the Society's leading water expert.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, a provocative discussion with Fred Pearce, an award-winning author and journalist based in London who's reported on environmental, science, and development issues all over the planet for the past twenty years.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

On this edition of ST, an interesting, big-ideas-driven conversation with Dr. Jim Norwine, the Regents Professor Emeritus of Geography at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. Dr. Norwine is the editor of a textbook called "A World after Climate Change and Culture-Shift" from Springer Publishers. It's a collection of essays that's described like so at the Springer website: "An international team of environmental and social scientists explain two powerful current change-engines and how their effects, and our responses to them, will transform Earth and humankind into the 22nd-century....

On this installment of our show, an interesting and provocative discussion with Fred Pearce, an award-winning author and journalist based in London who's reported on environmental, science, and development issues all over the planet for the past twenty years. Pearce tells us about his new book, a critique of "the new ecology" entitled "The New Wild: Why Invasive Species Will Be Nature's Salvation." As he notes in this book's Introduction: "Rogue rats, predatory jellyfish, suffocating super-weeds, wild boar, snakehead fish wriggling across the land -- alien species are taking over.

On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Anthony Barnosky, a Professor of Integrated Biology at UC-Berkeley and a leading scientist specializing on how global change affects biodiversity and ecosystem function.

Today we welcome Dr. Lewis H. Ziska to StudioTulsa. He's a research plant physiologist who works for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agriculture Research Service, where he specializes in crop systems and global change. Dr. Ziska has devoted much of his career to researching how climate change and rising levels of carbon dioxide affect plants and aerobiology as well as the roles they play in agriculture and public health.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Giles Slade, a Canadian environmentalist and journalist whose books include " Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America" and "The Big Disconnect: The Story of Technology and Loneliness." Slade's newest book, just out from New Society Publishers, is "American Exodus: Climate Change and the Coming Flight for Survival." As we read of this book at the New Society website: "Some scientists predict the sea will rise 1.5 meters before 2100, but rapidly melting polar ice caps co

Harvard University

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with political scientist and sociologist Theda Skocpol, whose recent work has focused on how political policy is made, and more often these days, how it gets derailed. Skocpol is the Victor Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University, and the author of numerous books on how political policy has been shaped and changed throughout history.

Our guest on ST is Tony Knowles, the president of the National Energy Policy Institute (or NEPI) and former governor of Alaska. Based here at the University of Tulsa, and created in 2008 with a donation from the George Kaiser Family Foundation (which also donates funds to Public Radio Tulsa), NEPI is a think-tank aiming to provide policymakers with better research and scholarship with which to design and implement energy policy.

On today's show, we speak with Dr. Laurence Smith, a professor of geography at UCLA, about his much-discussed book, "The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future," which first appeared in 2010 (and which The Wall Street Journal called "lively and impressive...[and] among the first in what promises to be an important publishing category, the explication of how the human landscape will be altered by artificially triggered climate change"). Dr.