The Green Movement

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about the science and strategies of composting -- and why it's good for our planet, and why it's good for us (mentally as well as physically). It's estimated that 1/3 of all the world'd prepared food materials go to waste -- and/or simply get thrown away -- so it's not surprising that composting is now becoming more and more popular among individuals and businesses alike.

On this edition of ST, we learn about how homeowners in the Greater Tulsa area can take simple steps -- in both their lawncare and their gardening practices -- to improve and preserve the quality of our local water, land, and ecology. The Yard By Yard Community Resiliency Project is an initiative of the Oklahoma Conservation Commission; the project started in OKC and is now happening in Tulsa.

Yes, the climate is warming, and yes, we human beings are causing this warming. And yes, things look very bad. But what can be done...and what can **we** do...right now? Our guest has some answers; she is Dr. Kimberly Nicholas, Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at the well-regarded Lund University in Sweden. Born and raised on a vineyard in Sonoma, California, Nicholas studied the effect of climate change on the California wine industry for her PhD at Stanford.

Our guest is the gardening expert Benjamin Vogt, who grew up in Oklahoma and Minnesota and is now based in Nebraska, and who is also the author of "A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future." Vogt will deliver the keynote address at a day-long gathering happening in OKC on Wednesday the 28th called "Rewilding Oklahoma: A Symposium for People, Places, and Pollinators." This event will highlight statewide successes in pollinator conservation, and you can learn more about it here.

On this installment of our show, we learn about "Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea," which is on view at the Tulsa Zoo through Jan. 5, 2020. This newly opened exhibit features art works made entirely of plastic debris collected from the world's beaches. The show -- which travels to venues all over the planet -- was created by the non-profit organization Washed Ashore, a group that is dedicated to educating everyone about plastic pollution through art. Our guest is John Tannous, a spokesman for Washed Ashore.

This coming Saturday (the 20th) will bring a free, day-long Earth Day Celebration to the Guthrie Green in downtown Tulsa; the gathering is to be presented by Tulsa Earth Coalition, Green Country Sierra Club, and OK Roots Music -- and a full schedule is posted here.

Our guests are Mike Appel and Emily Oakley, the husband-and-wife team behind Three Springs Farm, a small but active organic farm in Oaks, Oklahoma (about an hour east of Tulsa). Mike and Emily are well-known for their long-standing gig at the Cherry Street Farmers' Market, where they sell their produce on Saturdays from April to September. They join us on ST Medical Monday for a detailed chat about growing and selling organic food -- and about, more generally, farming at the grassroots scale.

The earth's climate has warmed significantly since the late 19th century, and the activities of humankind -- primarily greenhouse-gas emissions -- are the main cause behind this warming. Such is the consensus view of the world's climate scientists. On today's ST, we explore the issue of climate change with a noted **political** scientist. Joshua Busby is an Associate Professor of Public Affairs and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in October.) What's it like to live on one-tenth of the fossil-fuel consumption of the average American? Alarmed by the drastic changes now occurring in the Earth's climate systems, our guest on today's ST -- who is a climate scientist and father of two -- decided to find out. And he's very glad he did. Peter Kalmus is our guest; he is an atmospheric scientist at Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and he has a book out.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

What's it like to live on one-tenth of the fossil-fuel consumption of the average American? Alarmed by the drastic changes now occurring in the Earth's climate systems, our guest on today's ST -- who is a climate scientist and father of two -- decided to find out. And he's very glad he did. Peter Kalmus is our guest; he is an atmospheric scientist at Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and he has a new book out. As he announces in this book, he eventually made a decision to change both his life and the world...and in both cases, for the better.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Corey Williams, the executive director of the nonprofit Sustainable Tulsa, which is driven by (as noted at its website) these core principles: "A thriving society, responsible economic growth, and environmental stewardship...[which] are the mutually reinforcing pillars of sustainability." Ms. Williams tells us about Sustainable Tulsa's next First Thursday presentation, which is a free event happening tomorrow (the 6th) at the TCC Center for Creativity (near 10th and Boston in downtown Tulsa).

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interesting discussion about water conservation and related subjects with Noah Roberts, the proprietor of a recently opened shop in downtown Tulsa called The Water Co. This business sells water-bottle filling stations as well as reusable bottles, cups, and straws. And it does so, as noted on its website, in order to "improve community health and habitat by providing drinking water systems and reusable drinkware as an alternative to single-serve plastic bottles and cups.

On this edition of ST, we offer a wide-ranging chat with Bill Leighty, the executive director of Smart Growth Tulsa, which was founded in April of 2014 and incorporated as a nonprofit just recently. This organization, per its website, is "committed to policies, not politics. We seek to create healthy communities that work for everyone, with strong schools and local businesses, improved mobility options and jobs that pay well....

On this installment of ST, we speak with the corporate lawyer, conservation leader, and author Frederic C. Rich. His new book, just out, is called "Getting to Green" -- it argues for a new bipartisan coalition in American politics and culture in order to fix the ongoing (and basically nonfunctioning) mess that is the current Green Movement in the US.