Human behavior

Our guests are the Harvard evolutionary biologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and the award-winning science writer Kathryn Bowers, who tell us about their jointly written new book, "Wildhood." It makes several fascinating connections between the lives and behaviors of teenage animals and those of teenage human beings. Per the Los Angeles Times: "The vivid storytelling and fascinating scientific digressions in [this book] make it a pleasurable read.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Frans de Waal, a professor in Emory University's Psychology Department as well as the director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. He joins us to discuss his book, "Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves." Per The New York Times Book Review, the book is "game-changing.... For too long, emotion has been cognitive researchers' third rail.... But nothing could be more essential to understanding how people and animals behave.

Our guest is Frans de Waal, a professor in Emory University's Psychology Department as well as the director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. He joins us to discuss his new book, the bestselling "Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves." Per The New York Times Book Review, the book is "game-changing.... For too long, emotion has been cognitive researchers' third rail.... But nothing could be more essential to understanding how people and animals behave.

On this edition of our program, we offer an engaging conversatiuon with Deborah Hunter, a Behavioral Health Rehab Specialist and Case Manager at Family & Children's Services here in Tulsa. She's been with F&CS since 2011, and she is also a longtime and award-winning poet. Interestingly, Hunter also works as a social worker for the Tulsa City-County Library, mainly at the TCCL's Central Branch (and 5th and Denver).

The Judy O. Berry Honorary Lecture Series is an annual symposium presented by the TU Department of Psychology; the series features topics related to risk and resilience in children and in families. This year's keynote speaker is our guest on StudioTulsa: Dr. Courtney Stevens is Associate Professor and Director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

Neurobiologist and primatologist Robert Sapolsky has spent his professional life attempting to understand the underpinnings and science behind human behavior, studying wild baboon populations as well as the complex workings of the human brain. The professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University and MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant" recipient is the author of several books on various aspects of behavior -- and his latest, "Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worse," seems like a summation of his knowledge on the subject.