Humor and Satire

On this edition of ST, we are pleased to welcome the noted book critic, editor, and retired librarian Nancy Pearl back to our show. A former Tulsan, she's also the longtime book reviewer for this program, and she can be heard talking about books from time to time on NPR's Morning Edition. Nancy has a new novel out -- it's her first, and it's called "George and Lizzie" -- and it was thus praised by Booklist (in a starred review): "Pearl dramatizes a complicated and deeply illuminating union of opposites and conducts profound inquiries into the self, family, empathy, and love.

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting literary biography called "The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered In the Modern World." Our guest is the author, William Egginton, who is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities and a Professor of German and Romance Languages and Literatures at the Johns Hopkins University. As was noted of this compelling study in the pages of Publishers Weekly: "Egginton weaves together Cervantes's life story with his development as a writer.

(Note: This interview originally aired in July of last year.) On this presentation of ST, we chat with Joe Randazzo, a former editor of The Onion and former creative director of adultswim.com who now writes for the Comedy Central program called @midnight.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Mark Allen Jackson of Middle Tennessee State University. He's an expert on political expression in American folk music, and he's also the author of "Prophet Singer: The Voice and Vision of Woody Guthrie" (University Press of Mississippi). Dr. Jackson will be giving a talk at the Woody Guthrie Center in downtown Tulsa this coming Saturday, the 26th, beginning at 7pm. The lecture is entitled "Woody Guthrie as Political Humorist: His Influences, Expression, and Legacy," and it's free to the public.

On this edition of ST, we offer a discussion of the life and work of Thomas Nast (1840-1902), who is commonly thought of as "the father of American political cartooning." Highly influential in his time and still admired by artists, columnists, writers, and cartoonists today, Nast might be best known for his work -- done before, during, and after the Civil War -- for Harper's Weekly. He also, quite famously, created the modern illustrated version of Santa Claus...as well as the elephant as a symbol for the G.O.P. Our guest is Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing an interesting new literary biography called "The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered In the Modern World." Our guest is the author, William Egginton, who is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities and a Professor of German and Romance Languages and Literatures at the Johns Hopkins University. As was noted of this compelling study in the pages of Publishers Weekly: "Egginton weaves together Cervantes's life story with his development as a writer.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded Missouri-based printmaker, Tom Huck, who owns and operates a press called Evil Prints. Huck is known for his large-format, intricately detailed, and darkly humorous woodcuts -- many of which are also quite satirical or even raunchy -- that are inspired by the work of Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, as well as (much more recently) R. Crumb and various heavy-metal rock LP covers.

On this edition of ST, a chat with Bruce Adolphe, the New York-based pianist and composer who's probably best known for his long-running gig as "The Piano Puzzler" on the classical public-radio show, Performance Today. He'll be giving a free-to-the-public address on Saturday the 14th in Tyrrell Hall on the TU campus; the talk begins at 7pm and will focus on humor in music.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the charmingly off-the-wall and/or downright ghoulish cartoons of Charles Addams, whose distictive, humorous drawings graced the pages of The New Yorker (and other magazines) for many years, and were the basis, of course, for "The Addams Family" (of TV and movie fame). More than 50 works by Addams are now on display at the Zarrow Center for Art and Education in downtown Tulsa; "Charles Addams: Family and Friends" will be on view through September 27th.