Immigration Law

University of Tulsa

University of Tulsa Interim President Janet Levit issued a statement Friday in response to a recent announcement from Immigration and Customs Enforcement that would require international students at universities offering online-only courses in response to the COVID-19 pandemic to leave the country.

ICE.gov

The Tulsa Board of County Commissioners voted 3-0 on Monday to end a contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to house federal immigration detainees in a special unit at the Tulsa County Jail.

The Tulsa County Sheriff's Office (TCSO) said that the contract, under which they receive $69 per day for each federal inmate detained, was not making fiscal sense recently, due to a steady decline in inmates that the county says ICE has never explained.

Our guest is Sonia Shah, a science journalist who's long covered the intersection of science, politics, culture, and human rights for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, Scientific American, and other outlets. Her new book, which she tells us about, takes on many of our centuries-long assumptions about migration. The book is called "The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move." This work, per The New York Times Book Review, focuses "with compassion and insight a deeply complex and challenging subject....

The University of Tulsa College of Law's 20th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture was originally scheduled for earlier this year, but it was delayed due to inclement weather. It will now happen tonight, Tuesday the 12th, in an online-only presentation beginning at 6pm. Our guest, with whom we actually spoke earlier, will deliver this lecture: César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Denver.

Denver University law professor Cesar Cuauhtemoc Garcia Hernandez has been a harsh critic of U-S immigration policy, and has helped coin a word to describe that policy, "crimmigation." A term which refers to how immigration law, at one time, was a civil law proceeding, but today has merged with criminal law. Roughly 400,000 migrants are imprisoned each year, far more than Professor Garcia Hernandez says is necessary. Today's immigration detainee may be surprising.

Photo by KWGS News

At any given time, anywhere from just over 100 to over 250 people are being held at the David L Moss Criminal Justice Center as immigrant detainees by U.S Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, through the 287g program or as an ICE contract facility. Some are immigrants seeking asylum, others have been accused of a crime, some minor, others more serious. But upon arrival, they enter a strange amalgam where state law, federal law, and immigration law collide and intersect. 

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark, forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

Our guest for this installment of Found@TU is Dr. Andrew Grant Wood, the Stanley Rutland Professor of American History here at The University of Tulsa. He discusses his research on Mexican society and culture, talking in particular about his current project on colonial Veracruz; the joys and challenges of archival research; myths about immigration; and how history can teach us to challenge taken-for-granted assumptions. We also discuss the dark side of the tourism industry, including the exploitation of people and damage to the environment.

Our guest is James F. Hollifield, a Professor of Political Science and Academic Director of the Tower Center at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas, Texas; he's also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (TCFR) titled "Back to the Future: Trump's Migration Policies and the New Nativism." Dr.

The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his new book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark and forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

Our guest is César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Denver. On Thursday the 14th, beginning at 6pm, he'll deliver the 19th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture on the TU campus. He'll speak on "Migrating to Prison: Immigration in the Age of Mass Incarceration," which is also the title of his forthcoming book. His academic interests center on "crimmigration law" -- meaning, the convergence of criminal law and immigration law. His previous book, "Crimmigration Law," was published by the American Bar Association in 2015.