International Trade

Our guest is Klon Kitchen, who leads the tech policy initiative at the Heritage Foundation. He recently gave a talk titled "Disrupting National Security: The Growing Role of Big Tech in Geopolitics" at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR). At the Heritage Foundation, Kitchen heads an enterprise-wide, interdisciplinary effort to understand and shape our nation's most important technology issues.

Our guest is Tanvi Madan, a Senior Fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy in the Foreign Policy Program -- and also the Director of The India Project -- at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Her work centers upon India's role in the world and its foreign policy, focusing especially on the subcontinent's relations with China and the US. Madan recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, the title of which referred to Narendra Modi, who's been the Prime Minister of India since 2014.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization plays a much different role in the world today than it did when it was originally established in 1949. But what exactly is the role of NATO now? Our guest is Dr. Rajan Menon, Professor of International Relations at the City College of New York. He was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, where he spoke on "NATO Goes Global: A Look at the Record." Dr. Menon has been a Fellow at the Carnegie Council on Ethics in International Affairs and at the New America Foundation.

Our guest is Larry Diamond, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is also a past director of Stanford's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Diamond joins us to discus his new book, "Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency." As was noted by Gary J. Bass in The New York Times Book Review: "[Diamond] has spent 40 years circumnavigating the globe promoting democracy in Nigeria, Venezuela, and some 70 other countries. Yet today he is aghast....

Our guest on ST is David Shambaugh, the Director of the China Policy Program at George Washington University.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Ted Piccone, a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy as well as the Latin America Initiative at the Brookings Institution. His research is focused on global democracy and human rights policies, and he spoke recently at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations. Piccone is the author of "Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order," and his talk here in Tulsa was basically an extension of this book.

In late 2014, President Obama and Raúl Castro announced that the United States and Cuba would restore full diplomatic ties for the first time in more than 50 years. And late last month, of course, Fidel Castro died at age 90. So what happens next in U.S.-Cuban relations? Where do we go from here? Our guest on ST recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations that was focused on such questions. Ambassador Dennis K.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a new exhibit at the Gilcrease Museum, "Chocolate: The Exhibition," which will be on view through January 8th. Our guest is Gary Feinman, the MacArthur Curator of Mesoamerican, Central American, and East Asian Anthropology at The Field Museum in Chicago; he's one of the curators of this interesting show, which was actually created over a decade ago.

As noted in a 2014 article by Robert Kaplan in Forbes Magazine: "Geopolitics is the battle for space and power played out in a geographical setting. Just as there are military geopolitics, diplomatic geopolitics, and economic geopolitics, there is also energy geopolitics. For natural resources and the trade routes that bring those resources to consumers are central to the study of geography. Every international order in early modern and modern history is based on an energy resource.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a "Diplomacy Begins Here" summit happening today, Thursday the 31st, at the Gilcrease Museum. This event is presented by Tulsa Global Alliance and Global Ties Arkansas in partnership with The University of Tulsa, Global Ties U.S., and the U.S. Department of State. Our guest is Jennifer Clinton, president of Global Ties U.S., which was formerly known as the National Council for International Visitors.

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with political analyst Dean Cheng, who works at The Heritage Foundation as a senior research fellow on Chinese political and security affairs. A widely respected political writer and commentator, Cheng has appeared on National Public Radio, CNN International, BBC World Service, and elsewhere, and he recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of illegal trade on the global scale: from internet-driven piracy to the world's ports and shipping routes, from smuggling and trafficking to peddling counterfeit goods and knock-offs. Our guest is Dr. Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She's served in this capacity since 2012, and she is also OU’s Vice Provost for International Programs as well as its William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics.