Internet

Our guest on ST is Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, a professor of internet governance and regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. He's also a faculty affiliate of the Belfer Center of Science and International Affairs at Harvard. Mayer-Schönberger joins us to talk about "Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil," a new book for which he's a co-author.

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The Oklahoma Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday advanced two bills from Republican lawmakers aimed at perceived social media censorship.

Senate Bill 383 by Sen. Rob Standridge (R-Norman) would grant users the ability to sue certain sites if their political or religious posts are taken down. ACLU of Oklahoma says the bill would also prohibit sites from moderating hate speech, a term that lacks a precise legal definition and that Standridge’s bill pins to someone’s "personal moral code."

Increasing access to high-speed internet in rural Oklahoma may be an even tougher task than it sounds because of federal uncertainty.

Oklahoma’s Rural Broadband Expansion Council, which started meeting in August, is still debating how "broadband" should be defined. Council Chair Rep. Logan Phillips (R-Mounds) said during their December meeting it seems like it should be easy.

"But it’s incredibly difficult to define because … we define it wrong, it will be used against us. It’ll stop us in our tracks," Phillips said.

AJC.org

Anyone who's followed current events for the past several years -- here in the U.S. and/or across the globe -- will recognize that violent acts of antisemitism are on the rise. Why is this happening? Our guest is Holly Huffnagle, the U.S. Director for Combating Antisemitism at the American Jewish Committee (or AJC). She joins us to preview a free, upcoming, online talk that she'll deliver on the Zoom platform.

Our guest is Jared Yates Sexton, whose writing has included books and articles on politics, culture, and social justice, as well as works of fiction; he's an associate professor of creative writing at Georgia Southern University. He joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that the idea of "American exceptionalism" is not only false -- but it's been false since the country was founded.

A study of seven years' worth of data shows what states can do to improve broadband internet availability in rural areas.

OSU's Department of Agricultural Economics and Purdue University's Center for Regional Development teamed up for the study. OSU's Dr. Brian Whitacre told Oklahoma's Rural Broadband Expansion Council out of three broad policy categories, two really made a difference.

"The main policies that were more effective are the lack of restrictions and in-place state funds," Whitacre said.

Monday the 31st will bring the first day of classes for Tulsa Public Schools, and given the current pandemic, this is certainly going to be a very different school year. All TPS students, for starters, will be participating in either of two distinct programs: Distance Learning or Virtual Academy. How do these differ? And what should TPS parents be expecting -- and/or planning for -- as the new school year begins?

Our guest is Klon Kitchen, who leads the tech policy initiative at the Heritage Foundation. He recently gave a talk titled "Disrupting National Security: The Growing Role of Big Tech in Geopolitics" at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR). At the Heritage Foundation, Kitchen heads an enterprise-wide, interdisciplinary effort to understand and shape our nation's most important technology issues.

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Nathan Englander is our guest; he's the bestselling author of "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges," "What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank," and other books. He joins us to discuss his new novel, "Kaddish.com." Per a critic writing for The New York Times, this book is "sublime.... [It] reads like a modern-day Hasidic tale in which religious characters are bedeviled by the challenges of upholding God's word in an all too human world.... Kafka and Roth's influences are felt in Englander's work....

Nathan Englander is our guest; he's the bestselling author of "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges," "What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, and "Dinner at the Center of the Earth," among other books. He joins us to discuss his new novel, "Kaddish.com." Per a critic writing for The New York Times, this book is "sublime.... [It] reads like a modern-day Hasidic tale in which religious characters are bedeviled by the challenges of upholding God's word in an all too human world.... Kafka and Roth's influences are felt in Englander's work....

On this installment of our show, an in-depth discussion with the novelist Tom Perrotta, whose books include "Election" and "Little Children" (both of which were made into well-regarded films). Perrotta has a new novel out, titled "Mrs. Fletcher," and he tells us about it on today's program. As was noted of this book in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "[This book], Perrotta's seventh novel and first since 2011's "The Leftovers," operates and succeeds in ways that will be pleasingly familiar to his admirers.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of Russian hacking attempts worldwide, of cyber-attacks on the DNC that were meant to affect the 2016 Presidential Election, and of related news stories. And we'll also discuss, in more detail, what might be seen as the hi-tech precursor to these stories -- that is, the Soviet Union's longtime efforts to create a kind of national internet...long before the internet itself actually existed.

We're probably all aware of the much-publicized "online predators" who go after children these days on the internet, preying on innocent kids by way of trickery and violence. But these crimes, while obviously sick and deplorable, are over-hyped. How did this pervasive over-hyping come to be, and why does it persist? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr.

On this installment of ST, an interesting discussion with Whitney Phillips, an Assistant Professor of Literary Studies and Writing at Mercer University's Penfield College.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in March.) Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, Facebook pages, email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- as in, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days.

On this edition of ST on Health, Dr. Bryan Vartabedian is our guest. He's widely considered one of the most influential voices in American health care when it comes to social technology and its relationship with medicine, and he'll be leading a free-to-the-public workshop this afternoon (Tuesday the 14th) at the Perkins Auditorium on the OU-Tulsa campus (at 41st and Yale). The workshop is called "The Public Health Provider." As Dr.

(Please note: This show originally aired back in March.) Our guest on ST is Marc Goodman, whose still-in-progress professional career has focused on law enforcement and technology; he's served as everything from a street police officer to a senior adviser to Interpol.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of illegal trade on the global scale: from internet-driven piracy to the world's ports and shipping routes, from smuggling and trafficking to peddling counterfeit goods and knock-offs. Our guest is Dr. Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She's served in this capacity since 2012, and she is also OU’s Vice Provost for International Programs as well as its William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics.

Our guest on ST is Marc Goodman, whose still-in-progress professional career has focused on law enforcement and technology; he's served as everything from a street police officer to a senior adviser to Interpol.

(Please note: This program originally aired in September of last year.) On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.

On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) We speak by phone with Molly Knight Raskin, a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in Psychology Today, The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, and elsewhere; her TV credits include two PBS documentaries. Raskin is also the author of "No Better Time: The Brief, Remarkable Life of Danny Lewin, the Genius Who Transformed the Internet," which The Daily Beast has hailed as "a fascinating biography, but...also a history of the Internet and those who took it from clunky dial-up service to the speed-of-light marvel.

Today we speak by phone with Molly Knight Raskin, a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in Psychology Today, The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, and elsewhere; her TV credits include two PBS documentaries. Raskin is also the author of a new book, "No Better Time: The Brief, Remarkable Life of Danny Lewin, the Genius Who Transformed the Internet," which The Daily Beast has hailed as "a fascinating biography, but...also a history of the Internet and those who took it from clunky dial-up service to the speed-of-light marvel.

(Please note: This show first aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, we chat by phone with Nate Anderson about his new book, "The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online, and the Cops Followed." It's a work that carefully documents how the early, little-to-no-regulation days of the Web gave new opportunities and new avenues to con artists, cheats, liars, spies, snoops, spammers, pornographers, thieves, and other crooks --- and how this new manner of criminal activity basically invented a new kind of police work.

On this edition of ST, we chat by phone with Nate Anderson, a senior editor at Ars Technica, which is a long-running online journal that features IT news, reviews, and analysis.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the multi-faceted, multi-talented Amy Krouse Rosenthal. She's written more than 20 books for children, and her popular adult book of 2005, "Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life," was named by Amazon as one of the top ten memoirs of the previous decade. Rosenthal has also created several widely viewed videos (as seen on YouTube and elsewhere) --- among them "The Beckoning of Lovely," "The Money Tree," and "Life Is a Marathon" --- and some of these videos have gone viral online.