James Lankford

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Oklahoma U.S. Senators Jim Inhofe and James Lankford have issued statements saying there should be a vote on President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

The senators issued separate statements saying because Republicans control the White House and the Senate, it’s different than it was four years ago, when the Republican-controlled Senate refused to hold a hearing for 293 days on President Barack Obama’s nominee for the Court, Merrick Garland.

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The United States has committed $13.6 billion to six drug companies in an effort to produce a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible, but in a hearing with federal health officials last week, Oklahoma Sen. James Lankford raised concerns about how some are being developed.

"It's specifically the use of tissue that's from aborted children that becomes the challenge, and the Moderna is using embryonic kidney cells from aborted children. Johnson & Johnson is using aborted children embryonic retinal tissue for its production of the vaccines," Lankford said.

Office of Sen. James Lankford

Oklahoma's U.S. Senators, Republicans Jim Inhofe and James Lankford, blamed Democrats as the most recent coronavirus relief proposal failed to reach enough votes to survive a filibuster.

"Disappointed, but not surprised Senate Democrats blocked our targeted COVID-19 relief bill," Lankford said in a statement. "Only in Washington, D.C., would a $300 billion dollar piece of legislation be considered 'skinny', not even mentioning the $3 trillion we've already spent. We shouldn't continue spending money just because we can, we have to focus on what's needed."

John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation

The first Oklahoma site in the U.S. Department of the Interior’s African American Civil Rights Network has received its formal designation.

Wikimedia-Erasergirl

Oklahoma U.S. Sen. James Lankford and Rep. Tom Cole participated in separate hearings on the U.S. Postal Service on Friday, with both rejecting the idea recent changes have caused mail delays.

Ahead of a morning Senate committee hearing with U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, Lankford told NPR he had not heard many complaints of mail delays in the wake of cost-cutting measures like removing sorting machines and slashing overtime.

Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma

Hundreds of Oklahoma nonprofits have signed a letter in support of a proposed change to federal tax deduction limits supported by a bipartisan group of U.S. senators, including Oklahoma's Sen. James Lankford.

The proposal could be a component of a new coronavirus relief package currently being considered by Congress. It would allow for an above-the-line deduction of up to $4,000 for individuals or $8,000 for those filing jointly.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

A plan to swap Columbus Day for Juneteenth as a federal holiday backed by Oklahoma U.S. Sen. James Lankford has been withdrawn.

While the Senate still supports a bill to make Juneteenth a federal holiday, Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson withdrew an amendment to eliminate Columbus Day as a way to cover the cost of giving federal workers paid time off or overtime for the new Juneteenth holiday.

Lankford said the plan would have saved $600 million and notes less than half of states still officially celebrate Columbus Day.

1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission

Gov. Kevin Stitt said on Wednesday President Donald Trump’s potential visit to the Greenwood District ahead of his campaign rally this weekend is "in flux."

"I don’t know if the president is going to go to the Greenwood District now. It was a request that I made early but because of the Juneteenth celebration, with the Secret Service it could be problematic to have the president go there because some things have to be disrupted and shut down for a presidential visit," Stitt said.

Sen. James Lankford

Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) spoke with KWGS News' Chris Polansky on Monday, June 15th, about police reform following last month's killing of George Floyd, Black Tulsans' outrage over President Trump's initial Juneteenth date for a Tulsa rally (and his role in getting it changed), whether he thinks the rally should continue despite warnings from local and federal public health experts, and whether he intends to wear a mask to the rally.

Full transcript:

Sen. James Lankford

Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) said Thursday that while he doesn't agree with those who say American policing is systemically racist, nor does he support an end to qualified immunity, he does believe in making some significant reform to the criminal justice system.

C-SPAN

Seeking to mark out a middle ground between unmitigated spread of the coronavirus and an overzealous public health response, Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) said he believes that measures like social distancing and wearing masks have been effective across the country because of—not despite—their being optional.

Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK) said Wednesday that he is not yet convinced that Americans need more federal aid to deal with the economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic. 

In a Zoom videoconference organized by the Tulsa Regional Chamber, Inhofe said a package being put forward by House Democrats this week is too costly, too ideological, and too premature.

"Nancy Pelosi came dancing in and decided that she wanted to have a fourth round," Inhofe said. "So far we've spent $3 trillion, and she thought it would be fair to spend $3 trillion more."

In a webinar hosted by the Tulsa Regional Chamber on Monday, U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) said he fears that the amount of money paid out to Americans as federal unemployment benefits under new coronavirus legislation may be overly generous and bad economic policy.

"That's been the challenge of unemployment during this time period," Lankford said. "That we have a disincentive to get back to work." 

File photo-Wikimedia

Oklahoma’s congressional delegation is urging the Trump administration to let public hospitals access funding available through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act.