Legal Studies

Image Credit: The National Judicial College

Earlier this year, in its landmark McGirt v. Oklahoma decision, the United States Supreme Court ruled that, regarding the Major Crimes Act, much of the eastern part of our state remains as Native American land, since that land was never disestablished by Congress. So, how is McGirt playing out now in court rooms and legal offices across Oklahoma? And what does the immediate future hold vis a vis the McGirt ruling? Our guest is Aila Hoss, Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Tulsa College of Law.

Our guest is Dan Alexander, a senior editor at Forbes Magazine, who joins us to discuss his new book, "White House, Inc." It's an in-depth investigation into President Trump's business holdings, and into how he used the highest office in the land to enrich these holdings. In order to document the president's endeavors to make money from his office, the book examines his exclusive clubs, luxury hotels, overseas partnerships, commercial properties, and personal mansions.

Our guest is TU's Phi Beta Kappa Carl F. Cranor Visiting Scholar, Corey Brettschneider. He joins us to talk about his recent book, "The Oath and the Office." This book will form the basis for his upcoming, free-to-the-public Phi Beta Kappa lecture, which Brettschneider will give online this evening (the 17th) at 5pm.

On this episode of ST, we revisit a discussion that first aired back in October. At that time, we spoke with Eric Foner, the DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University.

On this edition of ST, a discussion from our archives. In 2017, we spoke with Richard Rothstein, a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

The current pandemic has brought keen economic hardship, of course, to a vast number of individials and families within various levels of American society. Given that so many folks who rent a house or apartment in our community now require extra time to acquire their unemployment checks and/or federal benefits, the Tulsa City Council voted unanimously last night to ask Gov. Stitt for a statewide moratorium on evictions. In addition to this, Tulsa County has historically had one of the highest rates of eviction in the country.

We chat with Todd F. Buchwald, who served as Special Coordinator for the U.S. State Department's Office of Global Criminal Justice from December 2015 through July 2017, and was conferred the rank of Ambassador by President Obama in July 2016. Prior to this, Mr. Buchwald served as a lawyer in the State Department's Office of the Legal Adviser, including a stint as the Assistant Legal Adviser for Political-Military Affairs during the Clinton and Bush Administrations.

As many of us return home for the holidays, we might see certain signs that our parents are not only aging but also, perhaps, are in declining health. What are those signs, and what should we do if we see them? Our guest has some answers. He's Tulsa-based attorney Todd Whatley, and he's with the Oklahoma Elder Law Group.

On this edition of our program, we discuss one of the cases that will be heard when the U.S. Supreme Court comes back into session next week. "Sharp v. Murphy" (previously known as "Carpenter v. Murphy") is a case that turns on whether Congress disestablished the Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation. Although this question pertains specifically to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the Court's decision might also end up applying to reservations of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole Nations. Our guest is a locally based expert on this case, TU Law Professor Judith Royster.

Our guests are the father and son team of John and Denver Nicks, who join us to duscuss their newly published, co-written book, "Conviction: The Murder Trial That Powered Thurgood Marshall's Fight for Civil Rights." This book tells the true and shocking but little-remembered story of a triple murder that happened in 1939 near Hugo, Oklahoma. An African-American farm-hand named W.D. Lyons was wrongly accused of this crime, and his lawyer was one Thurgood Marshall, who was then a young counsel with the NAACP's newly created Legal Defense and Education Fund.

Our guest is the Oklahoma-based author, attorney, and legal scholar Walter Echo-Hawk.

Our guest is César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Denver. On Thursday the 14th, beginning at 6pm, he'll deliver the 19th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture on the TU campus. He'll speak on "Migrating to Prison: Immigration in the Age of Mass Incarceration," which is also the title of his forthcoming book. His academic interests center on "crimmigration law" -- meaning, the convergence of criminal law and immigration law. His previous book, "Crimmigration Law," was published by the American Bar Association in 2015.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or NATO, is a multi-government military alliance between 29 North American and European countries. It began with 12 countries, and it will soon turn 70 years old. What is the future of NATO? (Especially at a time when the U.S. President has openly and publicly questioned the very importance of NATO....) What are NATO's main aims or goals -- and how have these changed over the years? Our guest on ST is Steven Hill, who was appointed the Legal Adviser and Director of the Office of Legal Affairs at NATO Headquarters in Brussels in February of 2014.

On this installment of ST, a discussion of the history of race relations in America -- and of a landmark Supreme Court decision that profoundly shaped this history. Steve Luxenberg is our guest; he is a longtime senior editor at The Washington Post, and his new book is "Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation." As Louis Menand of The New Yorker Magazine has noted: "Luxenberg has chosen a fresh way to tell the story of Plessy.... 'Separate' is deeply researched, and it wears its learning lightly. It's a storytelling kind of book....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing court fees, court fines, collection costs, and other court-related expenses, which, all told, make up somewhere between 80 and 90 percent of the budget for the State of Oklahoma's court system. Therefore, and quite regrettably, our state's jails are by now brimming with people whose only "crime" is being unable to pay such costs.

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Sunil Aggarwal, who grew up in Oklahoma and is now based in the Seattle area. He's a medical marijuana expert who's also a clinical instructor at the University of Washington School of Medicine; his focus is on the use of cannabis in clinical practice, medical research, and education. Dr. Aggarwal holds degrees in medicine, medical geography, chemistry, philosophy, and religious studies. He'll be speaking in support of State Question 788 today (the 8th) here in Tulsa, and then he'll do so tomorrow (the 9th) in Norman, Oklahoma.

Our guest is Danielle Allen, the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, who joins us to discuss her new book. That well-regarded book, "Cuz: The Life and Times of Michael A.," is an unflinching memoir of Allen's late cousin as well as a detailed and accessible critique of America's criminal justice system. Per Jennifer Senior in The New York Times: "A compassionate retelling of an abjectly tragic story.... Among the most valuable contributions Allen makes is forcing us to ask: To what end are we locking up our children?

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Katie Watson, an award-winning professor who has taught bioethics, medical humanities, and constitutional law for several years at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. She joins us to discuss her smart, well-balanced, and accessible new book, "Scarlet A: The Ethics, Law, and Politics of Ordinary Abortion." Per The Chicago Tribune, it "is a thoughtful and engaging consideration of one of this country's most controversial words: abortion." And further, from Louise P.

Women are the fastest-growing prison population group in the United States today -- and the State of Oklahoma, tragically, puts women in prison at twice the national rate. On this edition of ST, we check in with the non-profit organization known as Still She Rises, a public defender office based here in our community that's dedicated to representing North Tulsa mothers within the criminal justice system. Still She Rises, which began operations in Tulsa about a year ago, grew out of a similar group in NYC known as The Bronx Defenders.

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a discussion from July with Richard Rothstein, who is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Stephen Galoob, an Associate Professor of Law here at TU. Prof.

Our guest on ST is Issa Kohler-Hausmann, who will tomorrow night (Thursday the 16th) deliver the 2017 Judge Stephanie K. Seymour Distinguished Lecture in Law here at TU.

The Citizens United ruling, surely among the most controversial U.S. Supreme Court decisions of the modern era, was a 5-4 vote in 2010 affirming that the freedom of speech prohibits the government from restricting independent political expenditures by nonprofit corporations, for-profit corporations, labor unions, and certain other groups. It's a ruling that, interestingly, is opposed by people all over the political spectrum: red, blue, purple, independent, libertarian, etc. On this edition of ST, we learn about a nationwide effort to render this ruling null and void.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Richard Rothstein, who is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we get to know Robin Steinberg, a New York City-based public defender who founded the nonprofit Bronx Defenders in the late 1990s. This organization is still known for its model of "holistic defense," in which clients are advocated for by an interdisciplinary team of professionals (legal and otherwise) who address the underlying causes as well as the collateral consequences of our criminal-justice system. As Steinberg tells us, in January of this year, the Bronx Defenders opened a smaller-scale satellite office in North Tulsa called Still She Rises.

Today marks the beginning of the 2016 legislative session for the State of Oklahoma, and rightly enough, the issue gathering the most attention is the nearly $1 billion gap in the state's budget -- an astounding figure, to be sure. But on today's StudioTulsa, we turn our attention in another important, equally unsettling direction. And it's not a matter of one single troubling issue, actually, but rather a multitude of infractions.

Our guest on ST is Edward B. Foley, the Ebersold Chair in Law and Director of Election Law at the Ohio State University School of Law. Professor Foley tells us about his interesting new book, just out from Oxford University Press: "Ballot Battles: A History of Disputed Elections in the U.S." As was noted of this title by Tamara Keith, a correspondent for NPR News: "It's hard not to feel outrage and a little dread reading Edward Foley's retelling of ballot battles dating back to the nation's Founding.

This evening, Wednesday the 7th, the TU College of Law will present the 19th Annual John W. Hager Distinguished Lecture in the John Rogers Hall on the University of Tulsa campus. The lecture is free to the public and begins at 6pm. Our guest on ST is the well-regarded author and journalist who will be giving this lecture: Lincoln Caplan is the Truman Capote Visiting Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School, and his writing about legal matters appears in The New Yorker, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, and elsewhere.

Supreme Court

By all accounts, the recently-ended U.S. Supreme Court term has been an historic one. With major rulings concerning same-sex marriage, health care subsidies, lethal injection, religious symbols and free speech, social media and free speech, political redistricting, religious freedom in prison, and several other areas, the high court has put forth decisions in recent days and weeks that will undoubtedly influence American life in countless ways.

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