LGBT Rights and Issues

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Tamara Lebak, a Tulsa-based executive coach, organizational development consultant, and minister. She's also an accomplsihed singer-songwriter in the folk/roots/blues/alt-country manner, and she joins us to discuss her new album: "The Psalms Project: Volume 1." As Lebak has written of herself and her music online: "I'm a Universalist minister who believes that the Bible is ultimately about the relentless and persistent love of God.

Photo by Blake Little; "Bareback Bronc Riding, San Diego, California, 1992."

On this edition of ST, we learn about a photography show at Gilcrease that aims to capture the grit, determination, diversity, community, and "American-ness" of the national gay rodeo circuit; "Blake Little: Photographs from the Gay Rodeo" is on view at the museum through November 25th. The striking black-and-white photographs in this show (more than 40 of them in total) were all taken by Blake Little between 1988 and 1992.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Denver-based artist and author Melanie Gillman, who holds an MFA in comics from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Gillman is a queer, nonbinary, and award-winning cartoonist who specializes in color-pencil work and creates narratives with LGBTQ young-adult themes and subjects. Currently living and working here in our community as a Tulsa Artist Fellow, Gillman has a new book out; it's a graphic novel called "As the Crow Flies." We discuss this book on today's show.

The Supreme Court has by now affirmed, of course, that gay marriage is the law of the land, and LGBTQ lifestyles, television shows, cultures, and communities are becoming more and more present -- and thus more and more visible -- in American life. How is this sea-change affecting America's churches, especially here in the middle of the country? On this edition of ST, we speak with Rev. Cynthia Meyer, a United Methodist minister. Earlier this year, she came out -- while she was preaching a homily -- to her Edgerton, Kansas, congregation.

On our show today, a conversation with Micah Fitzerman-Blue, a writer and producer now living in Los Angeles who grew up in Tulsa and attended Holland Hall School (and later, Harvard University). He's probably best known as a writer and producer for the award-winning Amazon television show, "Transparent," starring Jeffrey Tambor and Gaby Hoffmann -- and his first feature film, "The Motel Life," appeared in 2013 and starred Dakota Fanning, Emile Hirsch, and Kris Kristopherson, winning both Best Screenplay and the Audience Award at the Rome Film Festival.

Today marks the beginning of the 2016 legislative session for the State of Oklahoma, and rightly enough, the issue gathering the most attention is the nearly $1 billion gap in the state's budget -- an astounding figure, to be sure. But on today's StudioTulsa, we turn our attention in another important, equally unsettling direction. And it's not a matter of one single troubling issue, actually, but rather a multitude of infractions.

On today's StudioTulsa, we learn about a new documentary film called "Misfits," which was screened last week at a special event at the Circle Cinema. This film, which was directed by the Danish filmmaker Jannik Splidsboel, and which debuted at the Berlin International Film Festival in February, is (per its listing at the IMDB website) about "three American teenagers from conservative Tulsa [who] are struggling with isolation and instability....

On this edition of our program, we speak with Prince Manvendra Singh Gohil, who belongs to the royal family of the former princely state of Rajpipla in the Indian subcontinent. He's the only known person of royal lineage in modern India to have publicly revealed that he is homosexual. After he suffered a nervous breakdown in 2002, Prince Manvendra's doctors told his family that he was gay, and he himself first talked publicly about his sexual orientation in 2006.