Liberal Politics

Our guest is Robert Kuttner, co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, who is also a former columnist for BusinessWeek, the Washington Post, and the Boston Globe. He joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that the 2020 presidential election will determine the very survival of American democracy. To restore popular faith in government -- and win the election -- Kuttner maintains that Democrats must nominate and elect an economic progressive. "The Stakes" explains how the failure of our economy to serve ordinary Americans effectively paved the way for a demagogic president.

We chat with Ian Shapiro, the Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. He's the co-author of a new book, "Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy from Itself," which he tells us about. The book engagingly explores why and how the form of government known as democracy has -- quite strangely and paradoxically -- reduced if not eradicated trust in political systems worldwide.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Physicians for a National Health Program (or PNHP). This collective, per its website, is "a nonprofit research and education organization of 20,000 physicians, medical students, and health professionals who support single-payer national health insurance." Our guest is Dr. Ed Weisbart, who heads the Missouri Chapter of PNHP.

Americans are less and less in agreement these days -- polarization, as we all know, has become a buzzword...and an omnipresent reality. But if there's one thing everyone agree on, it's that Washington, DC, is broken. How can it be fixed? Our guest is Joseph A. Califano, Jr., who spent thirty years in Washington at the top of the Pentagon, on the White House staff as chief domestic advisor to the President, and in the Cabinet.

The Citizens United ruling, surely among the most controversial U.S. Supreme Court decisions of the modern era, was a 5-4 vote in 2010 affirming that the freedom of speech prohibits the government from restricting independent political expenditures by nonprofit corporations, for-profit corporations, labor unions, and certain other groups. It's a ruling that, interestingly, is opposed by people all over the political spectrum: red, blue, purple, independent, libertarian, etc. On this edition of ST, we learn about a nationwide effort to render this ruling null and void.

Is America truly an "exceptional" nation? And what do we mean, really, when we assert this? Our guest on this edition of ST is Mugambi Jouet, who teaches at Stanford Law School, and whose writing has been featured in Mother Jones, Slate, The New Republic, the Huffington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Exceptional America: What Divides Americans from the World and from Each Other." As was noted of this timely work by The Mercury News: "Thought-provoking....

On this installment of ST, we speak with the corporate lawyer, conservation leader, and author Frederic C. Rich. His new book, just out, is called "Getting to Green" -- it argues for a new bipartisan coalition in American politics and culture in order to fix the ongoing (and basically nonfunctioning) mess that is the current Green Movement in the US.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Mark Allen Jackson of Middle Tennessee State University. He's an expert on political expression in American folk music, and he's also the author of "Prophet Singer: The Voice and Vision of Woody Guthrie" (University Press of Mississippi). Dr. Jackson will be giving a talk at the Woody Guthrie Center in downtown Tulsa this coming Saturday, the 26th, beginning at 7pm. The lecture is entitled "Woody Guthrie as Political Humorist: His Influences, Expression, and Legacy," and it's free to the public.

On this presentation of ST, our guest by phone is Tavis Smiley, the renowned broadcaster, author, political commentator, publisher, and columnist. Tomorrow night, Thursday the 28th, Smiley will be given the Tulsa Library Trust's 2016 Sankofa Freedom Award during a free-to-the-public ceremony at the Rudisill Regional Library in North Tulsa. (The library is located at 1520 N.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Timothy Dwyer, a writer whose work has appeared in Time, Washingtonian, and TheAtlantic.com.

On this installment of ST, we once again speak with policy analyst and political psychologist Steven Kull, the founder and president of a Washington-based non-partisan organization called Voice of the People. This group, which utilizes innovative polling methods and cutting-edge technology to enact an ongoing "campaign for a citizen cabinet," aims to give ordinary citizens a greater role in American government.