Magic City Books

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Sunita Puri, author of "That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour." Puri is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California, where she's also the medical director of palliative medicine at the Keck Hospital and Norris Cancer Center. She'll do a free event on the Zoom platform in connection with this insightful book on Wednesday the 28th at 6pm; the event is being co-presented by Hospice of Green Country and Magic City Books.

Our guest is Kevin Brockmeier, an imaginative and acclaimed writer based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Our guest is the Tulsa-based writer, creative writing teacher, playwright, and performer, Michael Wright. He's had an active, far-flung career in the dual worlds of literature and theatre. The author of novels, plays, poems, and varous performance-art and spoken-word experiments, Wright was also the 2010 Playwriting Teacher of the Year for the Association for Theatre in Higher Education and the winner of the Kennedy Center 2011 Milan Stitt Award for outstanding teaching and professional work in playwriting.

Our guest is Emily Contois, Assistant Professor of Media Studies here at The University of Tulsa. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." It is, per Library Journal, "a fascinating work of cultural studies that makes evident the continued power and threat of explicitly gendered food production and consumption in the 21st century. [This book is] recommended broadly for students and scholars of fields related to gender, culture, and consumption." And please note that Prof.

Our guest is the Colorado-based writer and writing instructor, Joanna Howard. She grew up in the Sooner State, and her newly published memoir, "Rerun Era," looks back on her childhood amid the environmentally and economically damaged rural flatlands of Northeastern Oklahoma. The book interweaves her personal memories, her family's larger story and dynamics, and the various TV shows that they all came together to watch (and bond over) in the late 1970s and early '80s.

On this edition of ST, we get to know photographer Dan Farnum, a Tulsa Artist Fellow who also teaches at the University of Tulsa School of Art. Originally from Michigan, Farnum now has a debut photography book coming out. It's titled "Young Blood," and it profiles children, teens, and young adults growing up amid the economic strife of Michigan's auto towns. Note: There will be a free-to-the-public book-release gathering for this volume at Magic City Books on Friday night, the 25th, beginning at 6:30pm.

Our guest is the former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Samantha Power, who's widely known as a tireless human-rights advocate. She joins us to discuss her recently published memoir, "The Education of an Idealist." Later this month, on Tuesday the 29th, Ambassador Power will take part in an onstage conversation (and subsequent book signing) with Dr. John Schumann, President of OU-Tulsa, at Congregation B'nai Emunah.

Our gust is Craig Johnson, author of the beloved and best-selling "Longmire" series of mystery novels. His newest book, "Land of Wolves," is the 15th novel to feature the Wyoming-based protagonist, Sheriff Walt Longmire. (These novels are also the basis, of course, for a popular TV series on Netflix.) Mr. Johnson will appear at a ticketed reading/signing event here in Tulsa on Thursday the 26th at the IDL Ballroom.

Our guest is the journalist Sarah Smarsh, whose book, "Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth," is now out in paperback. It's a far-reaching account of her coming of age in smalltown Kansas that sharply explores matters of poverty, class, family, income inequality, Midwestern values, personal ambition, faith, womanhood, and other key social and economic concerns.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn all about the vitally important book/author/reading series known as Book Smart Tulsa, which was started ten years ago (pretty much single-handedly) by our guest, Jeff Martin. He worked for years as a local bookseller and is now the Communications Manager at Philbrook Museum of Art; he's also the co-creator of our popular Museum Confidential podcast here at Public Radio Tulsa.

Our guest is Matt McCarthy, MD, a bestselling author, assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell, and staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he also serves on the Ethics Committee. He joins ST Medical Monday to discuss his new book, "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A riveting insider's look at the race to find a cure for antibiotic-resistant infections, one of the most pressing challenges in modern medicine....

The highly acclaimed novelist Rachel Kushner is our guest; she joins us to discuss her latest novel, "The Mars Room," which is now out in paperback. As was noted of this book (which was Time Magazine's #1 Fiction Title of the Year as well as a New York Times Notable Book of 2018) in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Two-time National Book Award finalist Kushner delivers a heartbreaking and unforgettable novel set in a California women's prison.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Carol Haralson. A former citizen of Tulsa, she is an award-winning book designer now based in Arizona. She's designed several striking book jackets over the years, across a range of literary genres. And Haralson's now written a book of her own -- a blend of memoir, fiction, poetry, personal essay, and photography titled "At the Far End of O Street." She'll appear tomorrow night, Wednesday the 17th, at a free reading and signing at Magic City Books (beginning at 7pm).

On this edition of ST, we listen back to our June 2018 chat with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Lawrence Wright. At that time, his book "God Save Texas" had just appeared; it's a collection of stereotype-busting essays exploring the history, culture, and politics of Lone Star State. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "Vivid.... Omnivorous.... Affectionate and genial.... [Wright] captures the full range of Texas in all its shame and glory....

Our guest is the science journalist, author, and editor Katherine Harmon Courage, whose new book -- which she tells us about -- is "Cultured: How Ancient Foods Can Feed Our Microbiome." What is the best way for us to feed, and to care for, our all-important microbiome -- and what is a microbiome, anyway? Courage investigates such questions by way of ancient food traditions as well as the latest research for maintaining a healthy gut. (Please note that Katherine Harmon Courage will do a free-to-the-public reading and signing on Wednesday the 20th at Magic City Books.)

"The River: A Novel"

Mar 11, 2019

Our guest is the writer Peter Heller, whose new novel, "The River," has been named an Amazon Best Book of March 2019. It's a fast-paced, thoughtful thriller about two friends on a river excursion in northern Canada. And per The Denver Post: "A fiery tour de force [of] poetic, staccato sentences and masterfully crafted prose.... The story itself resembles a trip down a river -- some parts are peaceful and allow for quiet introspection and big, deep breaths. But then you hit the rapids and the danger and risk jump off the page, forcing a sense of urgency.

Novelist Thomas Mallon is our guest. His latest historical yarn, which he tells us about, explores the George W. Bush White House. It's called "Landfall," and per The Wall Street Journal: "As in Mr. Mallon's many other novels, the writing is crisp and witty, the central characters complex and sympathetic in surprising ways, the narrative structure tight." And further, from The New York Times Book Review: "Entertainingly bitchy.... Smart and knowing and absorbing.... Extremely well-made.... The prose is a pleasure.... 'Landfall' is fascinating." Please note that Mr.

Our guest is David Treuer, an Ojibwe writer from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota, whose previous books include four novels and two books of nonfiction. He joins us to discusshis new book, a well-regarded historical study called "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present." As was noted of this work in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "An informed, moving, and kaleidoscopic portrait....

Our guest is the novelist Margaret Verble. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Cherokee America." Set on the American frontier in the spring of 1875, and specifically in the Cherokee Nation -- which would later be part of Oklahoma -- this novel follows a series of complex family alliances and cultural and racial clashes in the aftermath of the Civil War. It's a vivid (and often funny) novel of blood relations and home lands, of buried histories and half-told truths, and of past grief and present-day harm.

Our guest is Terrence Moore, a widely acclaimed photographer who's been shooting images along Route 66 for 40+ years. He tells us about his new book, "66 on 66," which gathers his finest images culled from the many hundreds he's made over the years of "the Mother Road." This book, with a corresponding text by local historian and author Michael Wallis, is just being published, and both Moore and Wallis will appear at a Magic City Books signing here in Tulsa on Friday the 18th. Details are posted here.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-annual Wine, Jazz & World Fete, which will happen soon in downtown Tulsa -- from Thursday the 4th through Saturday the 6th -- at both the Guthrie Green and Duet (i.e., Tulsa's brand-new jazz club). This festival, to be hosted by Public Radio Tulsa's Scott Gregory on both Friday and Saturday, will boast outstanding jazz and world-music artists, fine wines, delicious culinary offerings, performance art, kids' activities, and more.

Our guest on ST is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview from October of last year. At that time, we spoke with Jennifer Egan about her novel, "Manhattan Beach," which is just now out in paperback. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Kirkus: "After stretching the boundaries of fiction in myriad ways...Egan does perhaps the only thing left that could surprise: she writes a thoroughly traditional novel.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we revisit an interview that first aired in April with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." Per Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment. She meets people who are neither bitter nor sorrowful about their conditions, but are constantly aware of their precarious states....

On this edition of ST, we speak with Richard Russo, the bestselling and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of such popular novels as Empire Falls and Nobody's Fool. Also known for his short stories and autobiographical writings, Mr. Russo has a new book out, his very first collection of personal essays, which he tells us about. It's called "The Destiny Thief." Note: Mr. Russo will soon do a free-to-the-public reading and signing here in Tulsa; on Thursday the 17th, beginning at 7pm, he'll be at the TCC Center for Creativity.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa Lit.Fest, an impressive array of free-to-the-public events that will happen here in our community from tomorrow (the 19th) through Sunday (the 22nd).

Our guest is the writer and writing teacher Brandon Hobson, whose new novel, "Where the Dead Sit Talking," has just been published. Set in rural Oklahoma during the late 1980s, it's a spare, lyrical, and at times troubling story about a fifteen-year-old Cherokee boy who's been placed in foster care. As was noted of this book in a starred Publishers Weekly review: "Hobson's narrative control is stunning....

"Bobby BlueJacket: The Tribe, The Joint, The Tulsa Underworld" is a just-published book exploring little-known aspects of American crime, Native American identity, and smalltown politics in the 20th century. It's also a biography of a real and remarkable person: Bobby BlueJacket, born in 1930, who grew up amid teenage rumbles, mean streets, dangerous pool halls, and Midwest safecracker crews -- and who actually went from being a career thief to a prison journalist to a Eastern Shawnee Indian activist. Our guests on ST today are Michael P. Daley, the author of this new book, and Mr.

"To have great poets," as Walt Whitman once noted, "there must also be great audiences." And great cities, it would seem, likewise require great bookstores. On this edition of ST, we learn all about Magic City Books -- an indie bookstore owned and operated by the non-profit Tulsa Literary Coalition (or TLC) -- which will soon, at long last, open for business in downtown Tulsa. Indeed, after a series of construction-related delays, Magic City Books will open on Monday the 20th at 9pm...with Mayor G.T.