Medical Research

It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we, as individuals, do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr. Aly Cohen is a board certified rheumatologist and integrative medicine specialist, as well as an environmental health expert based in Princeton, New Jersey.

On this edition of our program, we learn about bariatric surgery, also known as weight-loss surgery. Once thought of in strictly "cosmetic" terms, the procedure has become more common, and more applicable, in recent years. Indeed, bariatric surgery is now known to foster significant loss of weight, recovery from diabetes, and improvement in the risk of cardiovascular issues. Our guest is a faculty member at the OU-TU School of Community Medicine and a specialist in bariatric procedures, Dr. Robert B. Lim. Dr.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) What do we mean by the phrase "patient-centered care"? And why is this expression being used more frequently in medical circles? Our guest is Dr. Saul J. Weiner, a professor of medicine, pediatrics, and medical education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He tells us about his book, "On Becoming a Healer," which is essentially a med school-based memoir/study as well as a critique/guidebook focused on how to become a more competent, more compassionate physician.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the science writer Riley Black, who writes under the pen name of Brian Switek. Black tells us about her newest book, which is just out in paperback, "Skeleton Keys: The Secret Life of Bone." It offers, per The Wall Street Journal, "a provocative and entertaining magical mineral tour through the life and afterlife of bone." And further, per the journal Nature: "A thoughtful, engaging meditation on the origins of the human skeleton, how it functions (or malfunctions), and how we come to terms with our essential but unsettling osseous framework."

Should schools reopen? Should we be playing (or practicing) team sports right now? And which type of mask is the safest one to wear? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak about these and other matters with Dr. Bruce Dart, executive director of the Tulsa City-County Health Department. Dr. Dart, who last appeared on our show back in March, offers an update on COVID-19 in our community at present.

You're probably familiar with this routine -- you swab your cheek or spit into a vial, then you send it away to a lab someplace. A month later, you get a report explaining where your ancestors came from...or whether you carry certain genetic risks. But what implications does this very popular trend have for American life and culture?

There are many, many different skin-care products out there...and keeping skin healthy has long been a booming industry...but how did we get here? And why are there so many confusing messages from health experts regarding the care of our skin? Why are there so many ineffective treatments? Our guest is a preventative medicine physician and staff writer for The Atlantic whose new book explains the surprising (and often unintended) effects of our modern-day hygiene practices; his book also offers an introduction to the new science of skin microbes and probiotics.

Our guest is Pam Fessler, an award-winning correspondent with NPR News who mainly covers poverty, philanthropy, and voting issues. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Carville's Cure," which is tells the fascinating and little-known story of the only leprosy colony in the continental United States. This facility, located in remote Carville, Louisiana, somehow became -- over the course of the 20th century -- much more of a refuge than a prison.

Our guest is Robert Kolker, a bestselling author and journalist who has written for New York Magazine, Bloomberg Businessweek, The New York Times Magazine, Wired, and other publications. He joins us to discuss his fascinating new book, "Hidden Valley Road: Inside the Mind of an American Family." It's a page-turning profile -- as much a detailed group biography as it is a keen work of science journalism -- of a certain post-WWII American family in which several of the family's twelve children suffered from acute schizophrenia.

(Note: This interview first aired last summer.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Adam S. Cifu; he's the co-author of an interesting book about "medical reversal" -- i.e., what happens when doctors start using a medication, procedure, or diagnostic tool without a robust evidence base...and then stop using it when it's found not to help, or even to harm, patients.

Our guest is Terri White, who left her post as the Commissioner of Oklahoma's Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services earlier this year. A well-respected expert on, and advocate for, all matters of mental health, White had been appointed Commissioner in 2007; she originally joined the Department in 2001. White joins us to discuss her new post, which will be serving as the CEO of the vital statewide nonprofit, Mental Health Association Oklahoma, which is based in Tulsa. She'll replace Mike Brose, who led MHAOK for some 27 years.

We welcome to our show Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a physician, epidemiologist, public health expert, and progressive activist. He was appointed health director of Detroit, Michigan, at age 30, and he was formerly a professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. El-Sayed's new book, which he tells us about, is "Healing Politics: A Doctor's Journey into the Heart of Our Political Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Bill McKibben with 350.org: "This is a very important book.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jennifer Clark, a Visiting Associate Professor of Community Health at TU's Oxley College of Health Sciences; she teaches in TU's Health Care Delivery Science Program. Dr. Clark is also a contributor/commentator for the ongoing, thrice-weekly Project ECHO updates regarding COVID-19. These online, open-to-the-public updates, originating from Oklahoma State University and freely streamable, are medically-driven information sessions presented by a multi-institutional array of doctors and scientists.

Our guest is Dr. Vinayak K. Prasad, a practicing hematologist-oncologist and internal medicine physician based in San Francisco. He joins us to discuss his important new book, "Malignant: How Bad Policy and Bad Evidence Harm People with Cancer." This work explains how hype, money, and bias can -- and often do -- mislead the public into thinking that many worthless or unproven cancer treatments are effective. As noted by Dr. David P.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Bon Ku, an ER doc and Assistant Dean for Health and Design at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Ku is also the co-author of a new book, "Health Design Thinking: Creating Products and Services for Better Health." This novel and fascinating work argues that the principles of human-centered design can and should be applied to today's health care challenges. The book's focal points range from the design of drug packaging and exam rooms to the use of internet-connected devices for early detection of breast cancer. As Dr.

What happens when a woman seeking an abortion in the U.S. is turned away? Our guest is Diana Greene Foster, PhD, who set out to answer this question as definitively as possible.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Mikkael Sekeres, a leading cancer specialist who writes regularly for The New York Times. He tells us about his new book, "When Blood Breaks Down: Life Lessons from Leukemia." This work carefully examines leukemia in its different forms as well as the development of drugs to treat it.

Could dogs be used -- at some point in the future -- to effectively "sniff out" COVID-19 among human beings infected with the virus? We don't know. But research is now being done in various labs to explore this question. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we get an update from journalist Maria Goodavage, whose previous books include "Soldier Dogs: The Untold Story of America's Canine Heroes" and "Top Dog: The Story of Marine Hero Lucca." She actually spoke with us about six months ago, when her latest book was published.

What do we mean by the phrase "patient-centered care"? And why is this expression being used more frequently in medical circles? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saul J. Weiner, a professor of medicine, pediatrics, and medical education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He tells us about his new book, "On Becoming a Healer," which is essentially a memoir/study/critique/guidebook focused on how to become a more competent, more compassionate physician. As was noted of this work by Dr. Ronald Epstein, of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry: "Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we meet immunologist Dr Eric Fajgenbaum, a researcher on the fairly rare disorder, Castleman's Disease. A survivor of this lymphatic condition himself, Fajgenbaum has devoted his work to discover how FDA-approved drugs can be repurposed to effectively fight Castleman's. 

Our guest is Matt McCarthy, MD, a bestselling author, assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell, and staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he also serves on the Ethics Committee. He's the author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic," which was originally released last summer. Kirkus Reviews called the book "a riveting insider's look at the race to find a cure for antibiotic-resistant infections, one of the most pressing challenges in modern medicine....

Today, in labs and clinics all over the globe, the search for a COVID-19 vaccine is moving incredibly fast. On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting and optimistic account from the vaccine-related annals of American history as we revisit a 2015 interview from our archives. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs about her biography, "Jonas Salk: A Life." The book also offers a fascinating cultural hitory of polio in the US.

(Note: This program originally aired back in the fall.) Our guest is Dr. Sarah E. Hill, a professor at TCU in Ft. Worth, Texas. She's seen as an authority on evolutionary approaches to psychology and health, and her new book, which she tells us about, is "This Is Your Brain on Birth Control: The Surprising Science of Women, Hormones, and the Law of Unintended Consequences." As was noted of this work by Dr.

Public health officials in Tulsa -- and everywhere else, of course -- are now monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a new coronavirus, COVID-19. This virus was first identified in China in January. Late last week, the first confirmed COVID-19 case was announced in Tulsa County: a man in his fifties who had recently visited Italy. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer an update on this still-evolving, fast-changing situation. Our guest is the Tulsa Health Department's executive director, Dr. Bruce Dart, who has worked in public health for forty years.

On this edition of our show, we explore the "Moral Injury of Healthcare." Our guests are Dr. Wendy Dean and Dr. Simon G. Talbot, who have together created a new nonprofit aiming to (as noted at the nonprofit's "fix moral injury" website) "help all of us change the conversation about healthcare. This is NOT about burnout. It is about taking care of ourselves by taking care of patients.... The crisis of clinician distress is not just a professional issue for [Dean and Talbot]. It is also a personal issue.

Our guest is Dr. Christopher Kerr, the CEO and chief medical officer at Hospice Buffalo. He joins us to discuss his important new book, which might be the first-ever volume to both document and study the meaningful dreams and visions that people seem to universally experience as death approaches. As was noted of this book is a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Penetrating and empathetic.... This comforting guide will reassure the dying and their loved ones while providing instructive portraits of end-of-life patients for those who work in medical and healing professions."

Our guest is Dan Weissmann, a public-radio reporter/editor/producer whose work has appeared on Marketplace, Planet Money, 99 Percent Invisible, and NPR’s Morning Edition. He once again joins us on ST Medical Monday to give an update on An Arm and a Leg, his widely acclaimed podcast about the various price tags that come with health care in the U.S.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about The Prism Project, a far-reaching, recently-released needs-assessment survey that was commissioned in order to better inform the Greater Tulsa community about issues related to our LGBTQ+ neighbors, friends, and fellow citizens. As per the Prism Project website, Tulsa Reaches Out (which is an advisory council within the Tulsa Community Foundation) "commissioned The Hope Research Center at the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa to conduct the survey within Tulsa's LGBTQ+ community.

On this edition on ST Medical Monday, we learn about Sick, a podcast from WFYI and Side Effects Public Media (with help from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PRX). This podcast, per its website, "is a new investigative [series concerning] what goes wrong in the places meant to keep us healthy. The first season explores the complications of fertility medicine, one Indiana doctor's abuse of power, and the generations of lives he affected." Our guests are the two reporters behind Sick, Lauren Bavis and Jake Harper.

Our guest is journalist Maria Goodavage, whose previous books include "Soldier Dogs: The Untold Story of America's Canine Heroes" and "Top Dog: The Story of Marine Hero Lucca." She joins us to talk about her newest book, "Doctor Dogs: How Our Best Friends Are Becoming Our Best Medicine." As noted by Prof. Clive Wynne, director of the Canine Science Collaboratory at Arizona State University: "Goodavage takes the reader on a fascinating journey to uncover the amazing things dogs can do for their human friends.

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