Medical Research

Our guest, Dr. Arthur Kleinman of Harvard University, is an acclaimed and influential scholar-writer on the topics of psychiatry, anthropology, global health, and cultural issues in medicine. He's also the author of "The Illness Narratives: Suffering, Healing, and the Human Condition," which has long been taught in many U.S. medical schools. Dr. Kleinman joins us to discuss his new book, a work of both memoir and scholarship that stems from the pivotal decade or so during which he cared for his late wife.

On this edition of our show, we are discussing adverse childhood experiences (or ACEs) in Oklahoma. Specifically, we're talking about an in-depth series of articles about ACEs that ran in the Tulsa World earlier this summer. Our guests are Dr. Kim Coon, a Professor and the Director of Psychotherapy Education in the Department of Psychiatry at the OU-Tulsa School Of Community Medicine, and Ginnie Graham, a columnist with the World. Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in April.) When we refer to "implicit bias" in today's world, we mean those unconscious stereotypes or automatic assessments that we all make -- all of us -- about people of a race, color, or background that differs from our own. What happens when implicit bias occurs among doctors, nurses, or other medical experts? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Jabraan Pasha with the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, where he is Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine and Faculty Director of Student Recruitment. Dr.

Our guest is Dr. William Hoy, who has studied funeral rites and rituals (as practiced worldwide) for three decades, examining how they're used to help mourners both make sense of death and deal with the major changes it brings to the lives of suvivors. Dr. Hoy teaches in the Medical Humanities Program in the College of Arts and Sciences at Baylor University. He'll be the first speaker (on September 3rd) in a three-speaker series of events happening soon at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Learning Center.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we present our third and final health-related installment of the popular Life Kit podcast from NPR, which is an ongoing feature presenting useful "how to" tips to listeners on various aspects of daily living. Our own John Schumann co-hosted a trio of medical-based Life Kit podcasts which originally appeared earlier this summer, and those are the three episodes we're sharing on our program (last week, the week before last, and today).

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer the second of three consecutive installments of the popular Life Kit podcast from NPR, which is an ongoing feature presenting useful "how to" tips to listeners on various aspects of daily living. Our own John Schumann co-hosted a trio of health-related Life Kit podcasts which originally appeared earlier this summer, and those are the three episodes we'll be sharing on our program (last week, today, and next week).

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer the first of three successive installments of the popular Life Kit podcast from NPR, which is an ongoing feature presenting useful "how to" tips to listeners on many various aspects of daily living. Our own John Schumann co-hosted a trio of health-related Life Kit podcasts which originally appeared earlier this summer, and those are the three episodes we'll be sharing on our program (today, next week, and the week after).

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Adam S. Cifu; he's the co-author of a new book about "medical reversal" -- i.e., what happens when doctors start using a medication, procedure, or diagnostic tool without a robust evidence base...and then stop using it when it's found not to help, or even to harm, patients.

Our guest is Matt McCarthy, MD, a bestselling author, assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell, and staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he also serves on the Ethics Committee. He joins ST Medical Monday to discuss his new book, "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A riveting insider's look at the race to find a cure for antibiotic-resistant infections, one of the most pressing challenges in modern medicine....

(Note: This interview originally aired in March.) If you follow the world of sports and fitness, you might know that "recovery" has become quite the buzzword. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're exploring the hype as well as the science behind various recovery products -- such as power bars, energy shakes, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, etc. Our guest is the noted science writer Christie Aschwanden, whose new book is "Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery."

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we revisit an interview that first aired in April of last year with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." Per Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Bob Hudson, a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics with the OU School of Community Medicine in Tulsa. He's practiced general pediatrics for the past 30 years -- and has spent the past 16 years as a behavioral pediatrician, helping parents whose children exhibit behavioral or learning problems. Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we welcome Dr. Sunita Puri, who tells us about her "visceral and lyrical" (The Atlantic) new memoir, a book that delves thoughtfully and artfully into medicine and spirituality. "That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour" finds Puri telling her own story, as the ambitious American-born daughter of immigrants, as well as the story of her parents: what they did for her, gave to her, and shared with her.

More and more people these days are getting interested in -- and are, in fact, adopting -- a plant-based lifestyle. Healthy eating, healthy cooking, healthy living, and just taking more control over one's health, period: these practices all seem to be increasingly "mainstream" in America today. And so, in that spirit, the first-ever Tulsa VegFest will happen on Saturday the 4th at Guthrie Green in downtown Tulsa. The event is free to all, running from 10am to 4pm, and it will feature speakers from around the U.S.

(Note: This installment of ST Medical Monday originally aired last summer.) It's taken a while for this particular truth to sink in, but America finally seems to be waking up to it: People with mental illness don't need to be locked up -- they need to be treated. On this edition of our show, we speak with journalist Alisa Roth, whose book, "Insane," is a well-regarded and alarming exposé of the mental health crisis now facing our courts, jails, and prisons. As was noted  of this book by The New York Times Book Review: "Chilling....

When we refer to "implicit bias" in today's world, we mean those unconscious stereotypes or automatic assessments that we all make -- all of us -- about people of a race, color, or background that differs from our own. What happens when implicit bias occurs among doctors, nurses, or other medical experts? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Jabraan Pasha with the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, where he is Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine and Faculty Director of Student Recruitment. Dr.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Monique Tello, a practicing primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, an instructor at Harvard Medical School, and a published clinical researcher. She tells us about her book, "Healthy Habits for Your Heart: 100 Simple, Effective Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure and Maintain Your Heart's Health." Dr. Tello also, as we learn today, writes for the popular Harvard Health Blog as well as her own GenerallyMedicine blog.

If you follow the world of sports and fitness, you might know that "recovery" has become quite the buzzword. On this edition of ST Medical, we're exploring the hype as well as the science behind various recovery products -- such as power bars, energy shakes, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, etc.

Our guest is the science journalist, author, and editor Katherine Harmon Courage, whose new book -- which she tells us about -- is "Cultured: How Ancient Foods Can Feed Our Microbiome." What is the best way for us to feed, and to care for, our all-important microbiome -- and what is a microbiome, anyway? Courage investigates such questions by way of ancient food traditions as well as the latest research for maintaining a healthy gut. (Please note that Katherine Harmon Courage will do a free-to-the-public reading and signing on Wednesday the 20th at Magic City Books.)

Our guest is the journalist Katy Butler, whose articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Best American Science Writing, and The Best American Essays. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "The Art of Dying Well." As noted by Dr. Lucy Kalanithi of the Stanford School of Medicine: "This is a book to devour, discuss, dog-ear, and then revisit as the years pass. Covering matters medical, practical, financial, and spiritual -- and, beautifully, their intersection -- Katy Butler gives wise counsel for the final decades of our 'wild and precious' lives.

(Note: This program originally aired in December.) Our guest is Anna Leahy, director of the Creative Writing Program at Chapman University. She joins us to discuss her book, "Tumor." A brief yet thoughtful volume that is part memoir, part study, and part history, the book was thus praised by Prof. Kristen Iversen at the University of Cincinnati: "In clear, compelling language, Leahy writes with insight and empathy about cancer and the social and cultural dimensions of one of our greatest fears.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jordan Greenbaum, a child abuse physician who works with victims of suspected physical and sexual abuse, neglect, and sex trafficking at the Stephanie Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. She also directs the Global Health and Well-Being Initiative with the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children, providing training on all aspects of child maltreatment for medical and non-medical professionals all over the globe. Dr.

Where does Northeastern Oklahoma now stand, when it comes to HIV/AIDS care? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Tulsa Cares, a local nonprofit that, per its website, is "committed to creating a community where all people with HIV/AIDS have equal opportunities for healthy living. We advance our mission through empowerment, inclusion, and the creation of hope by offering tailored, integrated resources and advocating for the end of HIV stigma." One of our guests is Kate Neary, the Chief Executive Officer at Tulsa Cares.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Monique Tello, a practicing primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, an instructor at Harvard Medical School, and a published clinical researcher. She tells us about her new book, which is just out from Adams Media: "Healthy Habits for Your Heart: 100 Simple, Effective Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure and Maintain Your Heart's Health." Dr. Tello also, as we learn today, writes for the Harvard Health Blog as well as her own GenerallyMedicine blog.

On this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a timely conversation with two community leaders who are both involved with the Tulsa Community Service Council, and who are both, moreover, U.S. Military veterans: Dr. Erv Janssen and Jim Lyall. They join us to define and discuss the experience known as moral injury -- an affliction that's similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, yet which also differs from PTSD in several important ways.

How did our nation's current opioid crisis come about? What steps were -- or were not -- taken as this epidemic was first being recognized? Who should ultimately be held accountable for this widespread tragedy? What policies enabled it, and who has benefitted most from those disastrous policies? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we feature a "live onstage" interview that host John Schummann recently recorded here in Tulsa with Chris McGreal, a senior writer at The Guardian and former journalist for BBC.

Our guest is Dr. Jeff Alderman, Associate Professor of Community Medicine and director of TU's Institute for Healthcare Delivery Systems. He speaks with us about how palliative medicine alleviates suffering by offering humanistic, person-centered (and sometimes home-based) care. We discuss the value and challenges of this form of medical treatment, as well as ways to improve the health care system so that it can deliver better, safer, and less expensive care.

(Note: This program originally aired back in October.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Randi Hutter Epstein, M.D., M.P.H., who is an adjunct professor at Columbia and a lecturer at Yale. She joins us to discuss her book, "Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything." Per Publishers Weekly: "Science writer Epstein gives readers a lucid and entertaining look at the social and scientific history of endocrinology.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Teresa Carr, a journalist who wrote the cover story for the January 2019 issue of Consumer Reports. As this in-depth article (titled "Medical Screening Tests You Do and Don't Need") notes near the outset: "Today, as we've learned more about how to detect disease early, there are scores of blood tests, ultrasounds, and CT scans to screen for conditions like cancer and low bone density.

Our guest is Anna Leahy, director of the Creative Writing Program at Chapman University. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Tumor." A brief yet thoughtful volume that is part memoir, part study, and part history, the book was thus praised by Prof. Kristen Iversen at the University of Cincinnati: "In clear, compelling language, Leahy writes with insight and empathy about cancer and the social and cultural dimensions of one of our greatest fears.

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