The Middle East

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Bassem Youssef, the Egyptian comedian, media critic, TV host...and former surgeon and doctor. He came to widespread attention as the host of "El-Bernameg" ("The Show"), a popular satirical news program in Egypt, which aired from 2011 to 2014. (His work on this program, which grw out of the Arab Spring, led to Youssef's being widely compared to the American satirist Jon Stewart.) Youssef joins us to discuss the development of his career thus far, which now includes a new children's book: "The Magical Reality of Nadia."

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Robert Draper is our guest; he is a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing writer to National Geographic. His past books include the bestselling "Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W.

Our guest is Clarissa Ward, CNN’s chief international correspondent, who joins us to talk about her new autobiography. As noted of this work by a critic with Booklist: "Ward details her often harrowing career in this page-turning memoir.... Readers will come away with at least a basic understanding of multiple international conflicts. This is a wonderful addition to the list of recent titles about women working in war-torn lands." And further, from Publishers Weekly: "[An] insightful memoir....

(Please note: This interview first aired back in March.) Our guest is Katharine Holstein, an American-Canadian writer and human rights advocate. She's also the co-author of "Shadow on the Mountain: A Yazidi Memoir of Terror, Resistance, and Hope." As was noted of this compelling profile of the Yazidi people of northwestern Iraq by The New York Journal of Books: "[This is a] spellbinding tale woven with gorgeous phrasing, compelling you to finish its journey at a breakneck pace along with Shaker Jeffrey, a hero of Promethean proportions....

Robert Draper is our guest; he is a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing writer to National Geographic. His many books include the bestselling "Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W.

Our guest is Katharine Holstein, an American-Canadian writer and human rights advocate. She's also the co-author of a new book, which she tells us about: "Shadow on the Mountain: A Yazidi Memoir of Terror, Resistance, and Hope." As was noted of this work by The New York Journal of Books: "A spellbinding tale woven with gorgeous phrasing, compelling you to finish its journey at a breakneck pace along with Shaker Jeffrey, a hero of Promethean proportions....

We chat with Todd F. Buchwald, who served as Special Coordinator for the U.S. State Department's Office of Global Criminal Justice from December 2015 through July 2017, and was conferred the rank of Ambassador by President Obama in July 2016. Prior to this, Mr. Buchwald served as a lawyer in the State Department's Office of the Legal Adviser, including a stint as the Assistant Legal Adviser for Political-Military Affairs during the Clinton and Bush Administrations.

PHOTO BY CNN.COM

Our guest is Dr. Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Professor at the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR) titled "The U.S. and the Middle East: Making Sense of Oil, Regime Change, and Forever Wars." Dr. Landis also writes "Syria Comment," a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts 100,000 readers per month -- and he often consults with U.S.

Our guest is the former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Samantha Power, who's widely known as a tireless human-rights advocate. She joins us to discuss her recently published memoir, "The Education of an Idealist." Later this month, on Tuesday the 29th, Ambassador Power will take part in an onstage conversation (and subsequent book signing) with Dr. John Schumann, President of OU-Tulsa, at Congregation B'nai Emunah.

Our guest is Philip Mudd, former deputy director of the CIA Counterterrorist Center, who tells us about his new book, "Black Site." It depicts one of the most controversial and unsettling initiatives in American history -- i.e., the post-9/11 counterterrorism effort created and led by the CIA. Just after September 11, 2001, as we learn, the CIA evolved into a war-fighting intelligence service, constructing what was known internally as "the Program" -- a web of top-secret detention facilities intended to help prevent future attacks on American soil and worldwide.

Our guest is Susan Green, a curator at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. She's the local curator for a traveling show now at Philbrook's main campus -- "Wondrous Worlds: Art & Islam Through Time & Place" will be on view through October 6th. Per the Philbrook website, it is "the most extensive exhibition of Islamic art to be shown in Oklahoma, [and it] represents over 1,200 years of rich artistic creation, illustrating the great geographic expanse of the Islamic world.

Our guest is Elliot Ackerman, the author of several widely-acclaimed novels who's also a former Marine; he served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Ackerman joins us to discuss his new book, a collection of autobiographical essays called "Places and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning." Per a starred review of this volume in Booklist: "[A] searing, contemplative, and unforgettable memoir-in-essays....

Has the long-standing, bi-partisan, and rather rarified U.S. foreign policy establishment effectively failed our country? Yes, according to our guest today: Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago, and he's now a contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine. Walt's latest book is "The Hell of Good Intentions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S.

Beyond the series of conflicts that have stretched back decades in the Middle East, a new range of disputes, proxy wars, and conflicts have emerged in the region, all of which combine strategic and security concerns excacerbated by religious differences. Today Saudi Arabia and Iran are struggling for dominance in the region -- and this is playing out in ways ranging from extremist violence to civil war. 

Our guest is Dr. Elisha Waldman, a pediatric palliative care physician now based in Chicago, who tells us about his new book. It's a memoir called "This Narrow Space: A Pediatric Oncologist, His Jewish, Muslim, and Christian Patients, and a Hospital in Jerusalem," and it chronicles -- in ways lyrical, bittersweet, and inspiring -- the seven years he spent as a pediatric oncologist in Jerusalem. While there, as we learn, Dr.

Our guest today is Lee Gordon, the 2018 Laureate of the Brock Prize in Education. Gordon is the founder of Hand in Hand: The Center for Jewish-Arab Education in Israel. This Israeli non-profit organization has created a network of integrated, bi-lingual public schools serving Arab and Jewish children alike. Starting with just 50 students in 1998, as we learn on today's StudioTulsa, Hand in Hand by now has six campuses. It also has, more to the point, some 1,600 or so students who belive in Jewish-Arab partnership and coexistence.

On this edition of ST, an in-depth chat about President Donald Trump and the Middle East. Our guest is Daniel Benaim, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (where he researches U.S. policy in the Middle East) as well as a visiting lecturer at New York University. He's also been a foreign-policy speechwriter at the White House, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Senate.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a broadcast from late February. At that time, our guest was psychologist and author Kenneth E. Miller, who has been working with war-affected communities since 1991 as a researcher, clinician, organizational consultant, and filmmaker.

How, if at all, will the Israeli-Palenstinian conflict be affected by the Trump White House? Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa spoke on this topic last night at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR). Gershon Baskin is the founder of the Israel-Palestine Center for Research and Information, a joint public-policy think tank.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Ted Piccone, a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy as well as the Latin America Initiative at the Brookings Institution. His research is focused on global democracy and human rights policies, and he spoke recently at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations. Piccone is the author of "Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order," and his talk here in Tulsa was basically an extension of this book.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, the Middle East...and how it got that way. We speak with former U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker, who was once called by President Obama -- when he was being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- "America’s Lawrence of Arabia." Ambassador Crocker was in the Foreign Service for 37 years and, after retiring, was recalled to active duty by President Obama in 2011 to serve as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. Previously, he did stints as the U.S. Ambassador to Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Lebanon.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Charles E. Ziegler, who is Professor of Political Science as well as Distinguished Research Scholar at the University of Louisville. He specializes on the domestic, foreign, and security policies of Russia and Eurasia, and he recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: The Rest Against the West?" Dr.

On this edition of our show, we offer a conversation with author Hisham Matar. His first novel, "In the Country of Men," was short-listed for the Man Booker Prize and the Guardian First Novel Prize, and his latest book, his third, is a memoir entitled "The Return." This work tells the story of his father's kidnapping by Muammar Qaddafi's government -- and of the fallout endured by Matar and his family over the ensuing decades.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Blaise Misztal, the director of the National Security Program at the Bipartisan Policy Center, which is a Washington-based think tank aimed at developing principled, politically viable policy solutions. Over the years, Misztal has researched a variety national security issues, including U.S.-Turkey relations, Iran and its nuclear program, cybersecurity, stabilizing fragile states, and public diplomacy in the 21st century. He has published op-eds in The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, The New Republic, and elsewhere.

On this edition of ST, our guest is Yuval Rabin, son of the late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who will appear at the Circle Cinema tonight (Tuesday the 20th) as part of the 3rd Annual Oklahoma Jewish Film Festival. This event is a special screening-plus-Q&A gathering co-presented by the Circle Cinema, the Jewish Federation of Tulsa, and the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. Mr.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with John Kael Weston, who represented the United States for more than a decade as a State Department official. Weston has a new book out -- part memoir, part critique, part military history, and part geo-political reportage -- which he discusses with us today. It's called  "The Mirror Test: America at War in Iraq and Afghanistan." As was noted by The Washington Post: "As a former Foreign Service officer, Weston is perfectly positioned to provide a different perspective on these wars' sometimes-particular complexities....

As noted in a 2014 article by Robert Kaplan in Forbes Magazine: "Geopolitics is the battle for space and power played out in a geographical setting. Just as there are military geopolitics, diplomatic geopolitics, and economic geopolitics, there is also energy geopolitics. For natural resources and the trade routes that bring those resources to consumers are central to the study of geography. Every international order in early modern and modern history is based on an energy resource.

In the pre-9/11 past, threats to international security could usually be attributed to this or that "dangerous" or "unstable" nation-state. Today, however, such threats are quite often attributed not to nation-states, but to "non-state actors" like Boko Haram, Al-Qaeda, or the Islamic State (IS). We're speaking about this dramatic shift in thinking -- and in action, and in policy -- with Dr. Dan Caldwell, a professor of political science at Pepperdine University’s Seaver College. Dr.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is author Andrew Solomon, winner of the National Book Award and National Books Critics' Circle Award, whose past books include "Far From the Tree" and "The Noonday Demon." He speaks with us about latest volume, a collection of essays entitled "Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change, Seven Continents, Twenty-Five Years." It's a book that chronicles Solomon's stint in Moscow in 1991, when he joined artists in resisting the coup whose failure ended the Soviet Union; his 2002 account of the rebirth of culture in Afghanistan following the fall of the Taliban; h

On this segment of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to chat with Elaine Pagels, a leading theological scholar in America who has taught at Princeton University since 1982. Pagels is also a bestselling author; her landmark book, "The Gnostic Gospels," analyzed more than 50 early Christian manuscripts that had been unearthed in Egypt in the 1940s -- and it won both the National Book Critics Circle Award and National Book Award.

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