Military History

We've heard often about "essential workers" since the pandemic got underway -- those indispensable individuals who are, alas, in many cases under-appreciated, under-paid, or both. But such vital workers are not, of course, just those working in the medical, science, health, or rescue fields, and these workers were certainly an important part of American society **before** the pandemic ever hit. Our guest is the New York-based author and journalist Eyal Press.

(Note: This conversation originally aired earlier this year.) History is one thing; mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of a book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this work in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

On this edition of ST, we are discussing the history of the War on Terror -- i.e., the open-ended, multi-directional conflict that the U.S. government enacted some twenty years ago, in the immediate wake of 9/11 -- as well as how this war has moved both American politics and American society in increasingly authoritarian (and even racist) directions. Our guest is Spencer Ackerman, a national-security correspondent who's written for The New Republic, WIRED, The Guardian, and The Daily Beast.

(Note: This interview first aired in February of 202.) Very early in her career, the well-regarded American colonial historian Mary Beth Norton came to believe that the critical year in American independence was not 1776, but rather, 1774. Yet her academic focus on women's colonial history sidelined her interest in fleshing out this theory.

History is one thing, and mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused in a big way. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues on ST. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of an attention-grabbing new book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this wotk in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

Our guest is Ambassador Richard LeBaron, who retired from the U.S. diplomatic service in April 2012 after a 33-year career. In his final position at the U.S. Department of State, LeBaron was the founding Coordinator of the Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications. Currently, he is a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council in Washington. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations -- the first in-person event the TCFR has presented in over a year (due to the pandemic).

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is the British author Jenny Lecoat. She's recently published her debut novel, which she tells us about. "The Girl from the Channel Islands" is a compelling saga that happens to employ, at least in part, her own family's history. As was noted by Publishers Weekly: "Lecoat...draws on the history of Germany's WWII occupation of Jersey, one of the Channel Islands, where [she] was raised. During the summer of 1940, Hedy Bercu is living on Jersey after having escaped Nazi-occupied Vienna.

Photo via jewishpartisans.org

Next week, on Thursday the 22nd at 7pm, the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education and the Tulsa City-County Library will co-present the 23rd Annual Yom HaShoah Interfaith Commemoration.

(Note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is David Nasaw, the bestselling author and noted historian. He joins us to discuss his book, "The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War." It offers a far-reaching history of the one million refugees left behind in Germany after WWII, a disparate group that Nasaw refers to as "the last million." As explained in this careful documentation of postwar displacement and statelessness, the fate of "the last million" has been largely unknown, or hidden, until now.

(Note: This interview first aired last summer.) Our guest is Colin Dickey, a writer perhaps best known for his popular nonfiction book from years ago, "Ghostland." Dickey is a regular contributor to The LA Review of Books and Lapham's Quarterly; he also co-edited "The Morbid Anatomy Anthology." An active cultural historian and associate professor of creative writing at National University, he joins us to discuss his latest book.

(Note: This discussion first aired in October of last year.) Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to talk about his book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." This book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, the shaman-like Tenskwatawa.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Robert Draper is our guest; he is a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing writer to National Geographic. His past books include the bestselling "Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W.

Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." The book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, Tenskwatawa. Please note that Mr. Cozzens will take part in a free, online, upcoming book-discussion event on Monday the 2nd, to be presented on the Zoom platform.

SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty [at NPR.org]

Our guest is Dr. Dan Caldwell, a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University. He recently gave a private, online-only address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (TCFR) on the topic of "What Would a Biden Foreign Policy Be?" Dr. Caldwell now helps to coordinate the campaign activities of a group of national security and foreign policy professionals who have endorsed Vice-President Biden in his bid for the White House. Over the years, Dr. Caldwell has taught at the Naval Postgraduate School, Stanford, UCLA, and Brown University.

Our guest is Clarissa Ward, CNN’s chief international correspondent, who joins us to talk about her new autobiography. As noted of this work by a critic with Booklist: "Ward details her often harrowing career in this page-turning memoir.... Readers will come away with at least a basic understanding of multiple international conflicts. This is a wonderful addition to the list of recent titles about women working in war-torn lands." And further, from Publishers Weekly: "[An] insightful memoir....

Our guest is David Nasaw, the bestselling author and noted historian who, until last year, served as the Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Professor of History at the CUNY Graduate Center.

(Note: This show originally aired last year.) Our guest is Julie Berry, the bestselling young-adult novelist. She joins us to discuss her latest book, "Lovely War: A Novel." As was noted of this work by School Library Journal: "The Greek gods relate the tale of how four young people's fates collide in a love story for the ages. Caught by Hephaestus in an compromising position with Ares, the god of War, Aphrodite is put on trial by her husband in a Manhattan hotel.

(Please note: This interview first aired back in March.) Our guest is Katharine Holstein, an American-Canadian writer and human rights advocate. She's also the co-author of "Shadow on the Mountain: A Yazidi Memoir of Terror, Resistance, and Hope." As was noted of this compelling profile of the Yazidi people of northwestern Iraq by The New York Journal of Books: "[This is a] spellbinding tale woven with gorgeous phrasing, compelling you to finish its journey at a breakneck pace along with Shaker Jeffrey, a hero of Promethean proportions....

Robert Draper is our guest; he is a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing writer to National Geographic. His many books include the bestselling "Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W.

Our guest is the widely celebrated novelist and nonfiction writer Nicholson Baker, whose new book is an engrossing mash-up of history, journalism, and memoir. The book is called "Baseless," and it's focused on the modern-day Freedom of Information Act, or FOIA. Baker's gripping and typically candid account carefully documents what it feels like to try to write about major historical events in a world of pervasive redactions, witheld records, widespead cover-ups, and glacially slow governmental responses.

Our guest is Colin Dickey, a writer perhaps best known for his popular nonfiction book from a years ago, "Ghostland." Dickey is a regular contributor to The LA Review of Books and Lapham's Quarterly; he also co-edited The Morbid Anatomy Anthology.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Very early in her career, the well-regarded American colonial historian Mary Beth Norton came to believe that the critical year in American independence was not 1776, but rather, 1774. Yet her academic focus on women's colonial history sidelined her interest in fleshing out this theory.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Our guest is Phil Keith, the co-author of a remarkable biography titled "All Blood Runs Red: The Legendary Life of Eugene Bullard -- Boxer, Pilot, Soldier, Spy." As was noted of this compelling work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This dazzling biography, drawing on the subject's unpublished memoir, explores the incredible life and times of the first African-American fighter pilot: Eugene 'Gene' Bullard.

Our guest is Katharine Holstein, an American-Canadian writer and human rights advocate. She's also the co-author of a new book, which she tells us about: "Shadow on the Mountain: A Yazidi Memoir of Terror, Resistance, and Hope." As was noted of this work by The New York Journal of Books: "A spellbinding tale woven with gorgeous phrasing, compelling you to finish its journey at a breakneck pace along with Shaker Jeffrey, a hero of Promethean proportions....

On this edition of ST, we speak with the scholar who will deliver the free-to-the-public 2020 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture here at TU tonight (Tuesday the 3rd). Our guest is is Dr. Christy L. Pichichero, whose work focuses on the racial (geo)politics of the early modern era in France. Her talk is titled "Black | Power: Race, Empire, & Privilege in Enlightenment France." Dr.

We chat with Todd F. Buchwald, who served as Special Coordinator for the U.S. State Department's Office of Global Criminal Justice from December 2015 through July 2017, and was conferred the rank of Ambassador by President Obama in July 2016. Prior to this, Mr. Buchwald served as a lawyer in the State Department's Office of the Legal Adviser, including a stint as the Assistant Legal Adviser for Political-Military Affairs during the Clinton and Bush Administrations.

PHOTO BY CNN.COM

Our guest is Dr. Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Professor at the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR) titled "The U.S. and the Middle East: Making Sense of Oil, Regime Change, and Forever Wars." Dr. Landis also writes "Syria Comment," a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts 100,000 readers per month -- and he often consults with U.S.

Our guest is Phil Keith, who is the co-author of a remarkable new biography titled "All Blood Runs Red: The Legendary Life of Eugene Bullard -- Boxer, Pilot, Soldier, Spy." As was noted of this compelling work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This dazzling biography, drawing on the subject's unpublished memoir, explores the incredible life and times of the first African-American fighter pilot: Eugene 'Gene' Bullard. At 12, he ran away from Columbus, Ga., to escape the vicious racism of the early-20th-century South for France, the country revered by his formerly enslaved father.

PHOTO BY EUROPEAN COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

The Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations recently presented an evening focused on Russia-China relations, and what the increasing ties between these two nations might mean for the United States. Our guest participated in that evening: Nina Rozhanovskaya has 7+ years of experience working on international academic projects and facilitating cooperation among Russian organizations and their overseas partners in a variety of areas. She is a coordinator and academic liaison for Kennan Institute in Russia.

Our guest is Dr. Matthew Restall, a Professor of Latin American History and Anthropology at Pennsylvania State University. He tells us about his 2018 book, "When Montezuma Met Cortés: The True Story Behind the Meeting that Changed History." As was noted in the pages of The New Yorker: "Restall skillfully describes a subtler story of relationships both loving and coercive." And further, from The Wall Street Journal: "Restall has a well-earned reputation as a myth-buster in the history of the New World....

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