Mythology

Photo via signaturesymphony.org

Our guest is the acclaimed Chickasaw classical composer, Jerod Impichchaachaaha’ Tate. He's known for blending Chickasaw and other Native American elements with European musical instruments to create compositions that've been performed by the likes of the National Symphony Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, and others. Tate will be the focus of the next Signature Symphony chamber music concert, happening in-person on Saturday the 16th at the VanTrease PACE on the TCC Southeast Campus.

(Note: This conversation originally aired earlier this year.) History is one thing; mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of a book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this work in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

History is one thing, and mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused in a big way. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues on ST. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of an attention-grabbing new book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this wotk in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

(Note: This interview first aired last summer.) Our guest is Colin Dickey, a writer perhaps best known for his popular nonfiction book from years ago, "Ghostland." Dickey is a regular contributor to The LA Review of Books and Lapham's Quarterly; he also co-edited "The Morbid Anatomy Anthology." An active cultural historian and associate professor of creative writing at National University, he joins us to discuss his latest book.

Our guest is Katherine May, a writer of fiction as well as nonfiction based in the seaside community of Whitstable, England. She joins us to discuss her enjoyable new book, "Wintering," which draws many engaging and far-flung lessons from literature, history, nature, and mythology about the transformative -- and even inspiring -- power of rest, retreat, and recuperation. As was noted of this book by a critic writing for BookPage: "Beautiful.... [May] is a poetic observer of the natural world, and quotable lines abound....

(Note: This show originally aired last year.) Our guest is Julie Berry, the bestselling young-adult novelist. She joins us to discuss her latest book, "Lovely War: A Novel." As was noted of this work by School Library Journal: "The Greek gods relate the tale of how four young people's fates collide in a love story for the ages. Caught by Hephaestus in an compromising position with Ares, the god of War, Aphrodite is put on trial by her husband in a Manhattan hotel.

Our guest is Colin Dickey, a writer perhaps best known for his popular nonfiction book from a years ago, "Ghostland." Dickey is a regular contributor to The LA Review of Books and Lapham's Quarterly; he also co-edited The Morbid Anatomy Anthology.

Hemingway once noted: "There are two kinds of stories. The ones you live and the ones you make up. And nobody knows the difference. And I don't ever tell which is which." Great writers aren't the only ones who feel compelled to tell stories. It's something we all do. We have to. Doing so makes us human; sharing stories makes life easier, richer, more coherent, more meaningful. On this installment of ST, we learn about a story-driven event for the Tulsa community that's happening this weekend.

On today's show, we speak with the writer and new-media strategist Mathew Gross, who (along with Mel Gilles) is one of the two authors of a thought-provoking and quite timely non-fiction book called "The Last Myth: What the Rise of Apocalyptic Thinking Tells Us About America." It's an engaging historical study that mainly explores two separate yet related queries: "Why are contemporary Americans so obsessed with the end of the world?" and "What does this obsession actually say about us, as a people?" Did you know, for example, that nearly 60 percent of Americans believe that the events fore