Native American

(Note: This discussion first aired in October of last year.) Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to talk about his book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." This book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, the shaman-like Tenskwatawa.

Photo of Claudio Saunt by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

Our guest is Claudio Saunt, a professor of American History at the University of Georgia. He'll soon deliver the 2021 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture at the University of Tulsa. His talk -- which will be offered as a digital/livestream/online-only event on March 4th (starting at 7pm) at utulsa.edu/cadenhead-settle -- will explore how slavery and indigenous dispossession effectively built the Antebellum South.

Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." The book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, Tenskwatawa. Please note that Mr. Cozzens will take part in a free, online, upcoming book-discussion event on Monday the 2nd, to be presented on the Zoom platform.

Music of the Indigenous Peoples of North America

Oct 8, 2020

The Rhythm Atlas Celebrates Indigenous Peoples' Day
Sunday, October 11, 6 - 7 p.m. on KWGS Public Radio 89.5

(Note: This show originally aired back in February.) Our guest is the novelist Margaret Verble. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Cherokee America." Set on the American frontier in the spring of 1875, and specifically in the Cherokee Nation -- which would later be part of Oklahoma -- this novel follows a series of complex family alliances and cultural and racial clashes in the aftermath of the Civil War. It's a vivid (and often funny) novel of blood relations and home lands, of buried histories and half-told truths, and of past grief and present-day harm.

Many of us living here in Oklahoma -- and indeed, living all over the nation -- are today both pleased and proud to affirm that Joy Harjo, the much-celebrated, 68-year-old writer and musician based in Tulsa, was recently named by the Library of Congress as the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, Harjo is the first Native person to be selected for this honorable role. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a conversation that we aired with Harjo in 2012, when her well-regarded memoir, "Crazy Brave," had just appeared.

Our guest is the Oklahoma-based author, attorney, and legal scholar Walter Echo-Hawk.

Our guest is David Treuer, an Ojibwe writer from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota, whose previous books include four novels and two books of nonfiction. He joins us to discusshis new book, a well-regarded historical study called "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present." As was noted of this work in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "An informed, moving, and kaleidoscopic portrait....

Our guest today is John M. Coward, an associate professor of communication here at the University of Tulsa, who tells us about his new book, "Indians Illustrated: The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press," just out from the University of Illinois Press. As noted of this book at the UIP website: "In the second half of the nineteenth century, Americans swarmed to take in a raft of new illustrated journals and papers.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the author Peter Cozzens, who has written several acclaimed books on the Civil War and the American West. He chats with us about his newest book, which is just out: "The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West." Per Douglas Brinkley, writing for The New York Times Book Review, this book is "a detailed recounting of random carnage, bodies burned, treaties broken, and treachery let loose across the land.... Cozzens admirably succeeds in framing the Indian Wars with acute historical accuracy....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the author, scholar, and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, who grew up in rural Oklahoma and is now based in San Francisco. She is the daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother, and she's been active in the international Indigenous People's Movement for more than four decades.

Act Bars Non-Members from Tribal Positions

Aug 16, 2012

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) — The Cherokee Nation Tribal Council has passed an act that requires specific Cherokee Nation executive positions to be held by enrolled tribal citizens.

The council approved the measure Monday on a 9-8 vote.

The positions are general counsel, chief of staff, communications director, government relations director and chief executive officer of Cherokee Nation Businesses.

Indian Affairs post filled by Oklahoma Cherokee

Jul 15, 2012
Native American News

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma has been named the director of the Indian Affairs Office of Budget Management in Washington D.C.

Thomas Thompson was selected for the post by acting Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs Donald Laverdure.

Thompson is currently the senior advisor to the area director of the Indian Health Service in Phoenix, Arizona.

Laverdure said in a statement that Thompson will help find efficient and cost-effective ways to provide services in Indian Country.

Federal suit over pay-day loans names two Oklahoma tribes

Apr 3, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Federal Trade Commission has filed a lawsuit against several Oklahoma tribes, claiming their payday loan companies are operating illegally.

The commission filed the complaint Monday against payday loan firms operated by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and the Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma. The complaint alleges that the companies would make repeated small withdrawals from customers' accounts — while charging a fee each time. According to The Oklahoman, one customer was charged $675 in fees to pay off a $300 loan.