NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization plays a much different role in the world today than it did when it was originally established in 1949. But what exactly is the role of NATO now? Our guest is Dr. Rajan Menon, Professor of International Relations at the City College of New York. He was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, where he spoke on "NATO Goes Global: A Look at the Record." Dr. Menon has been a Fellow at the Carnegie Council on Ethics in International Affairs and at the New America Foundation.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or NATO, is a multi-government military alliance between 29 North American and European countries. It began with 12 countries, and it will soon turn 70 years old. What is the future of NATO? (Especially at a time when the U.S. President has openly and publicly questioned the very importance of NATO....) What are NATO's main aims or goals -- and how have these changed over the years? Our guest on ST is Steven Hill, who was appointed the Legal Adviser and Director of the Office of Legal Affairs at NATO Headquarters in Brussels in February of 2014.

Since the end of World War II, the Atlantic Alliance between the countries of Western Europe and the United States has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Despite various strains over the years, my guest today has said: "We've always argued about the 'means,' not the 'ends,' of policy. Now we seem to want very different end results." He was referring in this comment to the Trump Administration's decision to withdraw from the Iranian nuclear deal, despite near-unanimous European opposition.