Nonfiction

(Note: This interview first aired last fall.) Our guest is Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, a noted expert on both psychology and neuroscience who's also a University Distinguished Professor at Northeastern University in Boston. She tells us about her book, "Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain." Per a starred review in Kirkus: "[This is] an excellent education in brain science.... [Feldman Barrett] deftly employs metaphor and anecdote to deliver an insightful overview of her favorite subject....

(Note: This show first aired early last year.) On this edition of StudioTulsa, we meet investigative journalist John Carreyrou, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter with The Wall Street Journal. He broke the story of the fraud perpetrated by the medical tech company known as Theranos and its charismatic young CEO, Elizabeth Holmes. That story is the basis of his book, "Bad Blood," which he tells us about.

Our guest is Herman Pontzer, an Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University and Associate Research Professor of Global Health at the Duke Global Health Institute. An well-known researcher in human energetics and evolution, he joins us to discuss his new book, "Burn: New Research Blows the Lid Off How We Really Burn Calories, Lose Weight, and Stay Healthy." The book draws on Pontzer's groundbreaking studies with hunter-gatherer tribes in order to show how exercise actually **doesn't** increase our metabolism.

Our guest is Nancy Pearl, the well-known librarian, bestselling author, and former executive director of the Washington Center for the Book at the Seattle Public Library. She's also a longtime book reviewer for KWGS-FM / Public Radio Tulsa, as she used to live and work in Tulsa, decades ago, before relocating to Washington State. We're very pleased to welcome Nancy back to StudioTulsa; she joins us to recommend several books she's been particularly enjoying over the past (often quite solitary) year or so.

(Note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is David Nasaw, the bestselling author and noted historian. He joins us to discuss his book, "The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War." It offers a far-reaching history of the one million refugees left behind in Germany after WWII, a disparate group that Nasaw refers to as "the last million." As explained in this careful documentation of postwar displacement and statelessness, the fate of "the last million" has been largely unknown, or hidden, until now.

(Note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is Emily Contois, Assistant Professor of Media Studies here at The University of Tulsa. Her recently published book, which she tells us about, is "Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." It is, per Library Journal, "a fascinating work of cultural studies that makes evident the continued power and threat of explicitly gendered food production and consumption in the 21st century.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Bret Stetka, an editorial director at Medscape.com, which is the professional division of WebMD.com. A non-practicing physician and active freelance health/science journalist, Stetka joins us to discuss his fascinating new book, "A History of the Human Brain: From the Sea Sponge to CRISPR, How Our Brain Evolved." It's a readable and engaging history of how our most mysterious organ developed over time...from the brain's improbable and watery beginnings to the super-complex marvel that's found within the head of Homo sapiens today.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest is the writer Jeff Hobbs, whose latest book closely follows four Los Angeles high school boys as they apply to college. These four teens are seniors at two very different high schools in L.A. -- one in Compton, the other in Beverly Hills -- and by telling their individual, personal stories, Hobbs reveals what our nation's young people (across all socio-economic backgrounds) are now confronting at home, at school, among peers, and throughout society.

Our guest is Dorothy Wickenden, an author and editor at The New Yorker Magazine. She tells us about her fascinating new book, which explores various interlinked facets of American history, including abolition, the Underground Railroad, the early women's rights movement, and the Civil War. As the noted Yale historian David W. Blight has written of this book: "As a revolutionary, Harriet Tubman made many allies, none more important than her Auburn, New York, neighbors Martha Wright and Frances Seward.

(Note: This interview first aired last summer.) Our guest is Colin Dickey, a writer perhaps best known for his popular nonfiction book from years ago, "Ghostland." Dickey is a regular contributor to The LA Review of Books and Lapham's Quarterly; he also co-edited "The Morbid Anatomy Anthology." An active cultural historian and associate professor of creative writing at National University, he joins us to discuss his latest book.

Our guest is Olivia Campbell, a journalist specializing in medicine and women who has written for The Guardian, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, and several other publications. Her first book is just out, and she joins us on ST Medical Monday to discuss it. "Women in White Coats: How the First Women Doctors Changed the World of Medicine" tells how three remarkable Victorian women broke down all sorts of barriers in order to become the first women doctors, thereby eventually revolutionizing the way all women receive health care.

Our guests today are the co-authors of an engrossing new book that blends true crime, memoir, and investigative reportage. Liza Rodman and Jennifer Jordan join us to talk about "The Babysitter: My Summers with a Serial Killer." This book details the life of a neglected young girl growing up in the Cape Cod region of the late 1960s, revealing in particular how she developed a friendship with her charismatic yet off-beat babysitter -- a man who, as she learned years later, was actually a serial killer.

(Note: This discussion first aired in October of last year.) Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to talk about his book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." This book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, the shaman-like Tenskwatawa.

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

(Note: This interview first aired last fall.) Our guest is Harold McGee, who writes about the science of food and cooking. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells." As was noted of this work by Booklist: "In his detailed survey of scents, food writer and cooking scientist McGee elegantly explains olfaction.... His exploration of our smelly world includes the odors of flora and fauna, soil and smoke, food and fragrances, but also the unexpected: primordial earth, rain, and the whiff of old books.

Our guest is Dr. Michael Roizen, the bestselling author and Chief Wellness Officer at the Cleveland Clinic. He's also the co-author of "The What to Eat When Cookbook," which is just out, and which builds upon a previous (and very popular) guidebook that he co-wrote called "What to Eat When." In both volumes, Dr. Roizen points out that **when** we eat (that is, what time of day) is actually crucial to the link between a healthy diet and healthy living. It's also crucial to disease prevention, better overall mental/physical performance, and a longer life. As Dr.

Welcome to The Best of StudioTulsa in 2020. All week, we'll be listening back to some standout interviews that originally aired last year.

On this edition of our show, we listen back to an interview from 2018 about a book called "Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century." This book is the basis for a forthcoming feature-film starring Frances McDormand. Our guest is the author of the book, Jessica Bruder.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in September.) It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr.

Our guest is Katherine May, a writer of fiction as well as nonfiction based in the seaside community of Whitstable, England. She joins us to discuss her enjoyable new book, "Wintering," which draws many engaging and far-flung lessons from literature, history, nature, and mythology about the transformative -- and even inspiring -- power of rest, retreat, and recuperation. As was noted of this book by a critic writing for BookPage: "Beautiful.... [May] is a poetic observer of the natural world, and quotable lines abound....

How will the current pandemic affect our upcoming holiday season? And what lessons from history, politics, and pop culture might help us answer this question? Our guest is Denise Kiernan, an author, journalist, and producer whose previous two books, "The Last Castle" and "The Girls of Atomic City," were bestsellers.

(Note: This discussion originally aired back in August.) How do we learn? And how do we learn best? What are the most effective ways of educating today? Our guest is Dr. Sanjay Sarma, who's the leader of the Open Learning program at MIT. He joins us to discuss his book, "Grasp." This pioneering work looks at the science of learning -- i.e., how the acquisition of knowledge works both in the mind and in the classroom.

Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." The book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, Tenskwatawa. Please note that Mr. Cozzens will take part in a free, online, upcoming book-discussion event on Monday the 2nd, to be presented on the Zoom platform.

Our guest on ST is Harold McGee, who writes about the science of food and cooking. His earlier books include "On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen" and "Keys to Good Cooking: A Guide to Making the Best of Foods and Recipes." He joins us to discuss his new book, "Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells." As was noted of this work by Booklist: "In his detailed survey of scents, food writer and cooking scientist McGee elegantly explains olfaction....

A high-sodium diet can be a deadly diet -- high levels of sodium have been linked to high blood pressure, strokes, and heart attacks. And yet, salt is everywhere. It's all but inescapable on the American foodscape; salt (and plenty of it) is in packaged foods, fast foods, canned foods, table-service restaurants, etc. So...why hasn't salt received the sort of public attention and regulatory action that sugar and fat have? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Michael Jacobson, who set out to answer this question.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in June.) What happens when a woman seeking an abortion in the U.S. is turned away? Our guest is Diana Greene Foster, PhD, who set out to answer this question as definitively as possible.

In late 2015, Zac Easter, a young man from a small town in Iowa, took his own life. The reason? According to the many journals and detailed writings that Zac left behind, this act of suicide was chosen by Zac because he was unable to continue his long-running battle against worsening traumatic brain injuries -- injuries that stemmed directly from the fact that Zac had been a football player, from third grade through high school.

Our guest is Clarissa Ward, CNN’s chief international correspondent, who joins us to talk about her new autobiography. As noted of this work by a critic with Booklist: "Ward details her often harrowing career in this page-turning memoir.... Readers will come away with at least a basic understanding of multiple international conflicts. This is a wonderful addition to the list of recent titles about women working in war-torn lands." And further, from Publishers Weekly: "[An] insightful memoir....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is Sonia Shah, a science journalist who's long covered the intersection of science, politics, culture, and human rights for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and other outlets. Her latest book, which she tells us about, takes on many of our centuries-long assumptions about migration. That book is "The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move." Per The New York Times Book Review, it focuses "with compassion and insight a deeply complex and challenging subject....

Our guest is Dan Alexander, a senior editor at Forbes Magazine, who joins us to discuss his new book, "White House, Inc." It's an in-depth investigation into President Trump's business holdings, and into how he used the highest office in the land to enrich these holdings. In order to document the president's endeavors to make money from his office, the book examines his exclusive clubs, luxury hotels, overseas partnerships, commercial properties, and personal mansions.

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