Oklahoma

Twitter/@QuikTrip

Weeks after a 22-year-old assistant manager at a Tulsa location of the Oklahoma-based convenience store and gas station chain QuikTrip died of COVID-19, the company has announced it is seeking to hire new assistant managers for its Tulsa stores.

"We look forward to expanding our hometown team of employees in the Tulsa area with hardworking, service-oriented people," a company representative said in a press release.

Andy Watson, photo courtesy of Bull Stock Media

With strict safety protocols in place — and no fans in attendance — the Professional Bull Riders brought live sporting events back to Oklahoma.

Forty-one cowboys competed at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie in a two-day event televised on CBS Sports News. Sean Gleason, PBR's CEO, said that the organization did everything it could to be able to hold the event safely. 

"For 40 days," Gleason said in a video posted to Twitter, "we've been at it 15 hours a day to get to this point where we have a safe and responsible plan to get back to bucking."

Marco Verch on Flickr, licensed under CC BY 2.0.

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- State and local governments across the United States have obtained about 30 million doses of a malaria drug touted by President Trump to treat patients with the coronavirus, despite warnings from doctors that more research is needed. 

Chris Polansky / KWGS

His hand seemingly forced by Governor Kevin Stitt's easing of restrictions on business closures implemented to slow the spread of COVID-19, Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum announced reluctantly on Friday that Tulsa's "Safer At Home" order will expire on Thursday, April 30th. 

At Least 7 Dead As Storms Hit Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana

Apr 24, 2020
File photo

MADILL, Okla. (AP) — Severe weather is blowing across the South after apparent tornadoes tore through parts of Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana.

At least seven people have been killed, including a factory worker whose body was found a quarter mile from where an apparent tornado struck the factory in southern Oklahoma.

A Louisiana man was swept away in flood waters after going out to grab a trash can, and a woman was killed on a bridge.

Three more died when apparent tornado touched down near Onalaska, Texas.

More than 150,000 customers are without power. 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The White House has told governors their leadership is critical in testing for coronavirus and provided a map showing that Oklahoma is one of four states with the lowest testing capacity in the United States.

Tulsa Gas Prices Lowest In Nation

Apr 14, 2020
KWGS News File Photo

CAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) — As demand declines during the coronavirus pandemic, the country's lowest average price per gallon is in Tulsa.

The average U.S. price of regular-grade gasoline fell 14 cents over the past two weeks, to $2.01 per gallon. An industry analyst says prices at the pump have dropped 52 cents over the past seven weeks.

The highest average price in the nation for regular-grade gas is $3.22 per gallon in Honolulu. The average price of diesel is $2.69, down seven cents.

Jimmy Emerson on Flickr, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Following the death of a tribal official, Cherokee Nation is preparing to face the coronavirus crisis head-on.

File photo from Flickr licensed under CC BY 2.0.

The federal government’s $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package includes a lifeline to small businesses: a $349 billion loan program to help pay employees' salaries during the pandemic. Oklahoma banks are taking advantage of the Paycheck Protection Program, administered by the Small Business Administration, to help get that money to businesses and employees across the state.

Allison Shelley/NPR

His voice has been described as being “like warm butter melting over BBQ’d sweet corn.” And you can hear him here in Tulsa next month!

NPR National Desk Correspondent Wade Goodwyn joins us at the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus Saturday afternoon, April 18th for a very special Give & Take.  Mark your calendar now; tickets for this opportunity to hear NPR’s Dallas-based Goodwyn will be available soon!

Our guest on ST is Oklahoma Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell, who joins us to discuss the new brand for the State of Oklahoma: "Imagine That." Pinnell led the lengthy, multifaceted process that came up with this recently-announced brand, which will soon start appearing on t-shirts, stickers, roadside signs, posters at airports, newly-designed license plates, and so on. He describes this brand-development process, and the thinking and planning that went into it, while also explaining what he believes this new brand will accomplish for our state.

Our guest is the Colorado-based writer and writing instructor, Joanna Howard. She grew up in the Sooner State, and her newly published memoir, "Rerun Era," looks back on her childhood amid the environmentally and economically damaged rural flatlands of Northeastern Oklahoma. The book interweaves her personal memories, her family's larger story and dynamics, and the various TV shows that they all came together to watch (and bond over) in the late 1970s and early '80s.

On this edition of our program, we discuss one of the cases that will be heard when the U.S. Supreme Court comes back into session next week. "Sharp v. Murphy" (previously known as "Carpenter v. Murphy") is a case that turns on whether Congress disestablished the Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation. Although this question pertains specifically to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the Court's decision might also end up applying to reservations of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole Nations. Our guest is a locally based expert on this case, TU Law Professor Judith Royster.

Our guest is Titus I. Jackson, the writer/director of a new documentary about the economic decline of the Sooner State and how this decline has affected public education. The film is called "Brokelahoma," and it         includes the voices and perspectives of many teachers from across our state. Note that there will be a special screening-plus-Q&A of this film on Monday the 23rd at the Circle Cinema here in Tulsa; more details are posted here.

Jason Lee

For our 2019 Summer Special, we chat at length with the photographer, actor, and legendary skateboarder, Jason Lee. He spent a good portion of 2018 road-tripping throughout Oklahoma while taking photographs (film only; no digital) for his first-ever solo museum show. That show is on view here in Tulsa at Philbrook Downtown through November 10th. 

Many of us living here in Oklahoma -- and indeed, living all over the nation -- are today both pleased and proud to affirm that Joy Harjo, the much-celebrated, 68-year-old writer and musician based in Tulsa, was recently named by the Library of Congress as the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, Harjo is the first Native person to be selected for this honorable role. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a conversation that we aired with Harjo in 2012, when her well-regarded memoir, "Crazy Brave," had just appeared.

Our guests are the father and son team of John and Denver Nicks, who join us to duscuss their newly published, co-written book, "Conviction: The Murder Trial That Powered Thurgood Marshall's Fight for Civil Rights." This book tells the true and shocking but little-remembered story of a triple murder that happened in 1939 near Hugo, Oklahoma. An African-American farm-hand named W.D. Lyons was wrongly accused of this crime, and his lawyer was one Thurgood Marshall, who was then a young counsel with the NAACP's newly created Legal Defense and Education Fund.

On this edition of ST, we're talking about two newly-opened photography shows, both on view in Tulsa at the Philbrook Downtown space through November 10th of this year. One exhibit documents a forgotten people; the other, a forgotten landscape.

On this edition of Medical Monday, as the Oklahoma Legislature has just recently completed its annual session, we offer a detailed review of whether and how our state's lawmakers have addressed various medical and healh-related issues. Our guest is Carly Putnam with the non-profit, non-partisan Oklahoma Policy Institute, where she serves as Policy Director and Health Care Policy Analyst.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Hannibal B. Johnson, the Tulsa-based attorney, local historian, and prolific author. He joins us to talk about his book, "The Sawners of Chandler: A Pioneering Power Couple in Pre-Civil Rights Oklahoma." As is noted of this eye-opening book at Mr.

On this edition of ST, we continue our series of interviews with the major candidates currently running for Oklahoma Governor. Our guest today is Chris Powell, the Libertarian candidate. (Please note that we've repeatedly tried to email and telephone Republican Kevin Stitt in order to set up such an interview; no one from the Stitt campaign has gotten back to us.) As Chris Powell states on his campaign website: "I grew up in Choctaw as the youngest of five children. My father was a truck driver and my mother a bookkeeper.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, with Election Day one week away, we begin a series of interviews with the major candidates currently running for governor. Our guest today is Drew Edmondson, the Democratic candidate, who previously served as Oklahoma's Attorney General for 16 years. As noted at the Edmondson campaign website: "Upon graduation from college, Drew enlisted in the United States Navy, where he reached the rank of Petty Officer Second Class and served a tour of duty in Vietnam.

Medical Marijuana was approved by voters here in Oklahoma as recently as June of this year, yet so much is happening on this front -- medically, politically, economically, legislatively, etc. -- that it can be rather difficult to stay informed. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jackie Fortier, the StateImpact Oklahoma reporter who covers health and medicine for KWGS, KGOU, KOSU, and other public radio outlets across the state. Fortier brings us up to speed on the fast-moving, far-reaching story that is Medical Marijuana in Oklahoma.

Our guest on ST is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

The long-awaited Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture (or OKPOP) is our topic on today's StudioTulsa. The design of the downtown Tulsa building that will house this museum has jus been announced. The structure will be on Main Street, across the street from the Cain's Ballroom, with construction to begin in the fall of this year.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we talk about the ongoing effort to make Route 66 a part of the U.S. National Park Serivce's National Historic Trail System. If this were to happen, Route 66 would become the 20th such trail in America, joining The Lewis and Clark Trail, The Oregon Trail, and others. This designation could mean a serious economic boost to our state, as Oklahoma has more Route 66 mileage than any other state through which the highway runs. We have two guests today.

One in seven adults has a mental illness, and one in 20 has a serious mental illness. Nearly 90,000 Tulsa County adults need treatment for severe mental illness but there isn't enough funding. Untreated mental illness is extremely costly to the state of Oklahoma. The compounding factors are complex and the solutions often seem bleak, so where do we go from here?