oklahoma city bombing

OKC Memorial and Museum

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Survivors and loved ones of the 168 people who were killed in the Oklahoma City bombing were not able to gather Sunday to mark the 25th anniversary of the attack, but that did not stop them from remembering.

Because the annual remembrance ceremony was canceled due to coronavirus restrictions, those the victims instead were honored with a video tribute that included the reading of the names of those who died followed by 168 seconds of silence.

U.S. Air Force

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Search-and-rescue workers came straight from the blast site, hard hats atop their heads and mud and grime on their boots.

Relatives of the missing joined loved ones of those already confirmed dead in holding teddy bears and wiping tears as this grieving heartland city — indeed, an entire shaken nation — came together to pray.

On a somber Sunday 25 years ago, the late Rev. Billy Graham shook off the flu to try and explain how a loving God could have allowed the April 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building to occur.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — EDITOR’S NOTE: On April 19, 1995, a former U.S. Army soldier parked a rented Ryder truck loaded with explosives outside a federal office building in Oklahoma City. The blast at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building killed 168 people and injured more than 500 others in what remains the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on American soil.

OKC Bombing Memorial

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Americans have been through a lot in the 25 years since the Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people, including foreign wars, mass shootings and the deadly Sept. 11 attacks.

But on April 19, 1995, the attack on the nation’s heartland shocked Americans out of their sense of security.