Oklahoma History

On this edition of ST, we learn about a multi-artist, multi-media exhibition opening soon at Living Arts of Tulsa called "Speak: Speak While You Can." The show gathers works by several outstanding Native American artists, all of the creations focused on various indigenous/tribal langauges. Our guests are the co-curators of this show, both of them noted Native artists in their own right: Tony A. Tiger (Sac & Fox/Seminole/Muscogee) and Bobby C. Martin (Muscogee/Creek).

Our guest is the true-crime writer Jax Miller, who joins us to discuss her new book. "Hell in the Heartland" documents a stranger-than-fiction cold case from rural Oklahoma that has stumped authorities for some two decades. The book is called "Hell in the Heartland: Murder, Meth, and the Case of Two Missing Girls." As was noted by Library Journal: "True crime fans who are fascinated by the dark side of rural life and police incompetence, and open to a somewhat ambiguous ending, will find much to savor."

The pandemic-shortened Major League Baseball season will begin next week, on the 23rd -- and, looking on the bright side, **some** baseball this summer will be much better, of course, than **no** baseball this summer. In that spirit, we listen back to a fine StudioTulsa discussion from August of last year, when our guest was Gaylon White, a former sportswriter for the Denver Post, the Arizona Republic, and the Oklahoma Journal.

Our guest is Dr. Syeachia Dennis, who joined the OU-Tulsa family medicine residency program in 2013, and who more recently completed a master's program from the John Hopkins School of Public Health. An Oklahoma native, Dr. Dennis is an Assistant Professor in the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine's Department of Family Medicine. She joins us for a candid, local-level discussion about the racial disparities that exist today in American health care: troubling, long-running disparities in access, treatment, perceptions, and outcomes. Dr.

Photo From Wikipedia

Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a surprising 5-4 decision in the case of McGirt v. Oklahoma; the Court ruled that much of the eastern half of Oklahoma is still an Indian reservation. In doing so, the Court affirmed that -- because Congress had not expressly disestablished the Muskogee Creek Reservation, which was created well over a century ago -- that Reservation still exists when it comes to the Federal Major Crimes Act.

We're pleased to welcome our friend John Wooley back to StudioTulsa. A longtime Tulsa-based music and pop-culture writer -- and the host, of course, of the popular Swing on This program, heard every Saturday night here on KWGS -- Wooley is the co-author, along with Brett Bingham, of a new book about the historic Cain's Ballroom.

Tulsa's John Hope Franklin Center will soon present the 11th Annual Reconciliation in America National Symposium, from May 27th through June 2nd. Given the pandemic, the symposium this year will happen online, and it will carry the theme of "Reconciliation and Technology: Neutral Resources for Social Good." This theme, per the John Hope Franklin Center website, "unites us as change agents, researchers of effective practices, and peacemakers in the intentional journey of reconciliation.

 

This episode of FBO -- our second -- aired on March 19 and 20, 2020.

Our guest is Leona Mitchell, the legenday American opera star, Grammy Award-winning soprano, and member of Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame. Born and raised in Enid, Oklahoma -- and now based there, after a long career that took her to famous opera houses all over the world -- Mitchell is perhaps best known for her 18 seasons as a leading spinto soprano at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. In 2014, she was inducted into the Oklahoma African-American Hall of Fame. She joins us to look back on her remarkable career.

Our debut epiosde! Aired on February 20 and 21, 2020.

Our guest on ST is Oklahoma Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell, who joins us to discuss the new brand for the State of Oklahoma: "Imagine That." Pinnell led the lengthy, multifaceted process that came up with this recently-announced brand, which will soon start appearing on t-shirts, stickers, roadside signs, posters at airports, newly-designed license plates, and so on. He describes this brand-development process, and the thinking and planning that went into it, while also explaining what he believes this new brand will accomplish for our state.

Our guest on ST is Randy Krehbiel, who's been a reporter for The Tulsa World since 1979 and now covers political and governmental affairs for that paper. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Tulsa, 1921: Reporting a Massacre." In this deeply-researched work, Krehbiel studies local newspaper accounts in order to understand the mindset and motivations of Tulsa's citizens (both black and white) at the time of this tragedy.

Our guest is the Tulsa-based author Hunter Howe Cates, who tells us about his new book, "Oklahoma's Atticus." It's a work of biography/history that profiles his own grandfather, Tulsa County public defender and Creek tribal member Elliott Howe. Howe, as we learn, was closely involved in the investigation and trial of a Tulsa murder case that made national news back in the early 1950s. On Nov. 7th, Cates will do a free-to-the-public reading and signing in connection with this work at Magic City Books.

Family of Bob Gregory

Bob Gregory died earlier this week of natural causes. He was 88. A longtime presence on Tulsa radio and television, Gregory started at KTUL Radio in 1960, after working at stations in Arkansas and Colorado. His pioneering career in broadcasting began in his late teens, in the early 1950s, immediately after service in the Army.

On this edition of ST, we get to know Ahniwake Rose, the incoming executive director of the nonprofit, non-partisan Oklahoma Policy Institute (a/k/a OK Policy). Rose, originally from Oklahoma, has spent nearly 20 years working at the intersection of public policy and nonprofit management. Previously, she was the Deputy Director of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), a national organization serving the interests of tribal governments and communities.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we revisit our fascinating 2017 conversation with David Grann, the bestselling author and staff writer at The New Yorker Magazine. At that time, Grann was promoting his then-new book, "Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI" (which has been optioned for a much-talked-about film version). Grann will deliver a free-to-the-public Presidential Lecture here at TU on Tuesday the 22nd; his talk begins at 7:30pm in the Reynolds Center.

On this edition of our program, we discuss one of the cases that will be heard when the U.S. Supreme Court comes back into session next week. "Sharp v. Murphy" (previously known as "Carpenter v. Murphy") is a case that turns on whether Congress disestablished the Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation. Although this question pertains specifically to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the Court's decision might also end up applying to reservations of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole Nations. Our guest is a locally based expert on this case, TU Law Professor Judith Royster.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in January.) Our guest is Terrence Moore, an acclaimed photographer who's been shooting images along Route 66 for 40+ years. He tells us about his new book, "66 on 66," which gathers his finest images culled from the many hundreds he's made over the years of "the Mother Road." This book also has a corresponding text by local historian and author Michael Wallis.

Our guest is Gaylon White, who was a sportswriter for the Denver Post, the Arizona Republic, and the Oklahoma Journal before working in the corporate world for nearly forty years. He tells us about his new book, which is his third volume to focus on minor-league baseball. The book is "Left on Base in the Bush Leagues: Legends, Near Greats, and Unknowns in the Minors." As was noted of this work by a reviewer for Baseball Almanac: "Immerse yourself in the magic of being a bush league fan....

(Note: This show originally aired back in February.) Our guest is the novelist Margaret Verble. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Cherokee America." Set on the American frontier in the spring of 1875, and specifically in the Cherokee Nation -- which would later be part of Oklahoma -- this novel follows a series of complex family alliances and cultural and racial clashes in the aftermath of the Civil War. It's a vivid (and often funny) novel of blood relations and home lands, of buried histories and half-told truths, and of past grief and present-day harm.

Today we welcome Sterlin Harjo back to StudioTulsa. The celebrated locally-based filmmaker has a new movie, which he tells us about. It's a documentary short called "Terlton," and it'll have its world premiere this coming Saturday, the 13th, as part of the 2019 Circle Cinema Film Festival. "Terlton" takes us back to the summer of 1985, when a small town in Oklahoma -- incredibly, and so sadly -- lost a full one-fourth of its population when an explosion happened at a local fireworks factory.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

Many of us living here in Oklahoma -- and indeed, living all over the nation -- are today both pleased and proud to affirm that Joy Harjo, the much-celebrated, 68-year-old writer and musician based in Tulsa, was recently named by the Library of Congress as the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, Harjo is the first Native person to be selected for this honorable role. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a conversation that we aired with Harjo in 2012, when her well-regarded memoir, "Crazy Brave," had just appeared.

Our guests are the father and son team of John and Denver Nicks, who join us to duscuss their newly published, co-written book, "Conviction: The Murder Trial That Powered Thurgood Marshall's Fight for Civil Rights." This book tells the true and shocking but little-remembered story of a triple murder that happened in 1939 near Hugo, Oklahoma. An African-American farm-hand named W.D. Lyons was wrongly accused of this crime, and his lawyer was one Thurgood Marshall, who was then a young counsel with the NAACP's newly created Legal Defense and Education Fund.

On this edition of ST, we learn about two new plays to be presented on April 19, 20, 26, and 27 at the Nightingale Theater here in Tulsa, at 1416 East 4th Street. Heller Theatre Company recently opted to stage two one-act plays (in a single evening) by a pair of Tulsa-based playwrights in order to continue its ongoing mission to support original dramatic work, and thus Heller is offering "Trade Privileges" (written by David Blakely) and "Niñas de la Tierra" (written and directed by Shadia Dahlal).

Our guest is the novelist Margaret Verble. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Cherokee America." Set on the American frontier in the spring of 1875, and specifically in the Cherokee Nation -- which would later be part of Oklahoma -- this novel follows a series of complex family alliances and cultural and racial clashes in the aftermath of the Civil War. It's a vivid (and often funny) novel of blood relations and home lands, of buried histories and half-told truths, and of past grief and present-day harm.

Our guest is Terrence Moore, a widely acclaimed photographer who's been shooting images along Route 66 for 40+ years. He tells us about his new book, "66 on 66," which gathers his finest images culled from the many hundreds he's made over the years of "the Mother Road." This book, with a corresponding text by local historian and author Michael Wallis, is just being published, and both Moore and Wallis will appear at a Magic City Books signing here in Tulsa on Friday the 18th. Details are posted here.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Hannibal B. Johnson, the Tulsa-based attorney, local historian, and prolific author. He joins us to talk about his book, "The Sawners of Chandler: A Pioneering Power Couple in Pre-Civil Rights Oklahoma." As is noted of this eye-opening book at Mr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, with Election Day one week away, we begin a series of interviews with the major candidates currently running for governor. Our guest today is Drew Edmondson, the Democratic candidate, who previously served as Oklahoma's Attorney General for 16 years. As noted at the Edmondson campaign website: "Upon graduation from college, Drew enlisted in the United States Navy, where he reached the rank of Petty Officer Second Class and served a tour of duty in Vietnam.

Recently, a University of Central Oklahoma professor drew much attention when he pointed out that our state could save $27 million in education spending if we consolidated our school districts. In a report called "Right-Sizing Oklahoma Districts: Examining District Size, Enrollment, and Superintendent Compensation in Oklahoma School Districts," Dr. James Machell points that the Sooner State has approximately 600 school districts -- yet in states with student populations similar to our own -- Louisiana, Alabama, and Kentucky, for example -- the average is about 200 districts.

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