Parenting

Why are we so addicted to our cell phones, our Facebook pages, our email In Boxes, and so forth? Some say it's a culture-wide (and incurable?) case of "FOMO" -- or, fear of missing out. On this installment of ST, we explore that fear by speaking with Christina Crook, a Canadian journalist. Back in 2012, Crook disabled the data on her smartphone, turned off her email, and entirely avoided the Internet for 31 days. That experience is chronicled in her new book, "The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World," which she discusses with us today.

(Please note: This show originally aired in October of last year.) Our guest is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Danielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it.

Howdy, folks, and Happy New Year from StudioTulsa. We've been airing The Best of ST for 2014 on our program lately, and hopefully you've heard and enjoyed some or all of these encore presentations.

Here's a guide to what we've been listening back to over the past week; please note that each listing below has a link whereby you can access a free, on-demand "stream" of the show in question. And thanks, as ever, for listening to ST.

Our guest on ST is Dr. George Glass, a longtime Texas-based physician who's also the co-author of "The Overparenting Epidemic: Why Helicopter Parenting Is Bad for Your Kids...and Dangerous for You, Too!" While the notion of "overparenting" or "helicopter parenting" is not really a new concept, what is rather newly and widely apparent is that our society's first generation of overparented children are now becoming adults in their own right.

Our guest on ST is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Dannielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a new book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it. The book is, as she explains, meant to be an easy-to-read, go-to resource for parents hoping to understand and communicate with their gay child.

On Thursday and Friday of this week, the 18th and 19th, TU's University School will present a pair of free-to-the-public presentations by Dr. Charles Fay. Dr. Fay is a parent, consultant, bestselling author, and president of the Love and Logic Institute, Inc., which he co-founded in 1977 with his father, the noted child-rearing expert Jim Fay.

We at StudioTulsa have been enjoying some much-cherished vacation time these past two weeks -- and hopefully you, dear listeners, have likewise enjoyed our Encore Presentations of ST for the weeks of August 4th and August 11th. If you'd like to listen to any of these past programs, you'll find audio-stream buttons for them at the following links.

Today, we welcome Quraysh Ali Lansana back to StudioTulsa. Lansana was born Ron Myles in Enid, Oklahoma, and originally worked in broadcast journalism here in our state before studying poetry and literature in New York and Chicago. He's written several books of poetry, edited or co-edited several anthologies, and works as an Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Chicago State University. He also teaches at writing workshops and literary events all over the country.

Kids are wonderful. Kids are amazing. Kids enrich, brighten, and deepen our lives as parents, obviously. But they also change us --- in so many ways --- and "being a parent" in America today means something very different from what it meant, say, fifty or sixty years ago.

On this installment of our show, which originally aired earlier this year, we speak with the author and journalist Mei-Ling Hopgood, formerly of Buenos Aires, now living and working (and parenting) in the American Midwest. Hopgood's new book is called "How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm: And Other Adventures in Parenting (from Argentina to Tanzania and Everywhere in Between)." It's an engrossing and accessible book about what we as Americans can learn from how other cultures approach the challenges all parents confront: bedtimes, potty training, feeding, play dates, teaching, and so forth.

Pages