Personal Health and Well-Being

Our guest is Kyle Harper, a professor of classics and letters at the University of Oklahoma, whose books include "The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease, and the End of an Empire" and "From Shame to Sin: The Christian Transformation of Sexual Morality in Late Antiquity." He joins us to discuss his hefty and fascinating new book, "Plagues upon the Earth: Disease and the Course of Human History." It offers a meticulously detailed "germ's-eye view" of human life on this planet -- from the origins of disease among our earliest hunter-gatherers to the current COVID-19 pandemic.

These are, as we all know, particularly anxious times; in this age of the Coronavirus pandemic, anxiety is clearly widespread. But what are the "good" aspects of anxiety? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Wendy Suzuki, a Professor of Neural Science and Psychology at New York University and a well-known authority on neuroplasticity. She joins us to discuss her bestselling new book, "Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion." Per The Washington Post: "The book contains surveys and strategies to help people assess and even befriend their anxiety.

Our guest is Dr. Jillian Horton, a medical educator, writer, musician, and podcaster based in Canada. As an award-winning teacher of mindfulness, she works with doctors at all stages of their careers who are dealing with guilt, grief, burnout, frustration, and/or other professional pressures. Dr.

Why do human beings sweat? And what other animals on this planet sweat, and why do they do it? Are there health benefits to sweating? Our guest is Sarah Everts, a science writer who has written for Scientific American, Smithsonian, New Scientist, and other publications, and who teaches journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

Photo via www.somersetlive.co.uk

Our guest is the award-winning science journalist Melinda Wenner Moyer, whose work appears in Slate, Scientific American, and The New York Times. She's also a parent, and she joins us to discuss her first book, which is just out. "How to Raise Kids Who Aren't A**holes: Science-Based Strategies for Better Parenting -- from Tots to Teens" is a guidebook focused on the many various concerns that moms and dads actually have in today's America.

Our guest is Dr. Adam Stern, a psychiatrist at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He is also an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and he joins us to discuss his new memoir, a candid, often moving reflection on his residency at Harvard. Per this starred summary of the book in Kirkus Reviews: "[A] dynamic debut memoir....

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Uma Naidoo. She's a board-certified psychiatrist (Harvard Medical School), a professional chef (Cambridge School of Culinary Arts), and a nutrition specialist (Cornell University). She's currently the Director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, and she joins us to talk about her bestselling new book, "This Is Your Brain on Food." As noted by Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University: "Dr.

Yes, the climate is warming, and yes, we human beings are causing this warming. And yes, things look very bad. But what can be done...and what can **we** do...right now? Our guest has some answers; she is Dr. Kimberly Nicholas, Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at the well-regarded Lund University in Sweden.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in March.) Our guest is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Death is something very few of like to talk about, or even think about, but it's a fact of life, after all -- the final fact of life, you might say. What if we could live our lives while looking at death in a more complete, more honest, less fearful way? Would our lives be richer? And would we actually be healthier individuals? Our guest, Barbara Becker, clearly and intelligently answers these questions in the affirmative.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about the science and strategies of composting -- and why it's good for our planet, and why it's good for us (mentally as well as physically). It's estimated that 1/3 of all the world'd prepared food materials go to waste -- and/or simply get thrown away -- so it's not surprising that composting is now becoming more and more popular among individuals and businesses alike.

Our guest is Summer Knight, MD, MBA, who's Managing Director in the Life Sciences & Healthcare Consulting practice at Deloitte. Long seen as a thought-leader when it comes to the digital transformation of medical care -- and more broadly, when it comes to intersection of healthcare, business, and technology -- Knight previously worked as a firefighter/paramedic-turned-physician; she was also the founder and CEO of FirecrackerHealth.

Here in the good ol' USA, a strong work ethic -- a drive to succeed through hard work -- is seen as a leading virtue, and indeed, as a necessity. We Americans have long been told that financial success and personal well-being will undoubtedly follow if we adopt a highly motivated mindset toward our job. On today's edition of ST, we look at the origins of that "highly motivated" outlook. Our guest is David Gray, a teaching professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Becky Wilcox, PT, MPT, PRPC, who was the first person in Oklahoma to be recognized (back in 2014) as a Certified Pelvic Rehab Practitioner; you can find her full bio here. A key part of the team at Physical Therapy of Tulsa, Wilcox is local expert on pelvic floor dysfunction, which is a broad term referring to a number of disorders that can occur when pelvic floor muscles or ligaments are injured.

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

Our guest is Steven Johnson, the bestselling author whose previous books include "Where Good Ideas Come From" and "The Ghost Map." He joins us to talk about his newest book, "Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer," which is also currently appearing as a TV documentary series on PBS. "Extra Life" is a book that offers, per Kirkus Reviews, "a surprising look at why humans are living longer.... Entertaining, wide-ranging, and -- in light of Covid-19 -- particularly timely."

Our guest on ST is Anna America, the Chief of Culture and Recreation & Parks Director for the City of Tulsa. The Tulsa Parks Department recently presented findings from a series of public-opinion surveys it's conducted over the past several months regarding its master plan. The consulting firm known as GreenPlay was employed in the execution of these surveys, as America tells us. She adds that more than half of those surveyed said that they'd "probably or definitely support" various potential funding sources for increasing the Parks Department's budget.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we discuss a work that takes a careful and long-overdue look at how caregiving and burnout so often go hand-in-hand in this country. Our guest is Kate Washington, an essayist, freelance writer, and food critic based in Northern California. Her new book, which she tells us about, is a memoir/report/study titled "Already Toast: Caregiving and Burnout in America." As was noted by Kirkus Reviews, this book is "a biting critique of how America is failing its unpaid caregivers....

Our guest is Herman Pontzer, an Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University and Associate Research Professor of Global Health at the Duke Global Health Institute. An well-known researcher in human energetics and evolution, he joins us to discuss his new book, "Burn: New Research Blows the Lid Off How We Really Burn Calories, Lose Weight, and Stay Healthy." The book draws on Pontzer's groundbreaking studies with hunter-gatherer tribes in order to show how exercise actually **doesn't** increase our metabolism.

Our guest on StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is journalist and author Larry Olmsted, who tells us about his latest book, "Fans: How Watching Sports Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Understanding." The book cites a wide range of new and recent studies on the topic of sports fandom, thus arguing that the more we root for a given sports team, the better our social, psychological, and physical health is likely to be -- and the more meaningful our personal relationships will be, and the more connected and happier we will feel overall.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the National Center for Wellness & Recovery, which is based at the OSU Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa. The mission for this facility, per its website, is "to inspire hope and to develop innovative, science-driven treatment interventions to improve the lives of those afflicted by pain and substance-use disorders." Our guest is Dr. Kelly Dunn, a psychiatrist who is also the Executive Director for Clinical Treatment at the National Center.

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Our guest is Dr. Michael F. Myers, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University in Brooklyn, New York. He's the author or co-author of several works, including "Why Physicians Die by Suicide." Dr. Myers joins us on StudioTulsa Medical Monday for a discussion of his new book, "Becoming a Doctors' Doctor: A Memoir." As was noted of this reflective and readable work by Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Ina Park, who's an associate professor at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, a Medical Consultant at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Division of STD Prevention), and the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center.

Photo Credit Union Theological Seminary

Our guest is the Rev. Dr. Serene Jones, a well-known theologian who grew up in Oklahoma and is now the President and Johnston Family Professor for Religion and Democracy at the Union Theological Seminary in New York City. (Union is an interdenominational seminary that was established in 1836.) Formerly a professor at Yale Divinity School, Dr. Jones has published many articles and books over the years, and she's an ordained minister in both the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and the United Church of Christ. On Sunday the 31st, Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're looking at the connections between diet, weight control, and health.

Our guest is Dr. Michael Roizen, the bestselling author and Chief Wellness Officer at the Cleveland Clinic. He's also the co-author of "The What to Eat When Cookbook," which is just out, and which builds upon a previous (and very popular) guidebook that he co-wrote called "What to Eat When." In both volumes, Dr. Roizen points out that **when** we eat (that is, what time of day) is actually crucial to the link between a healthy diet and healthy living. It's also crucial to disease prevention, better overall mental/physical performance, and a longer life. As Dr.

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