Pets

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

Tulsa dogs may be getting more room to roam off-leash.

The city's park and recreation board heard and approved a proposal earlier this month to explore turning Gunboat Park North, near 11th and Elgin, into Tulsa's third off-leash dog run.

"For a city of our size, we're actually underserviced on dog parks," said Thomas Carlson of Carlson Development Group, the real estate firm championing the project near their offices located on Gunboat Park.

Could dogs be used -- at some point in the future -- to effectively "sniff out" COVID-19 among human beings infected with the virus? We don't know. But research is now being done in various labs to explore this question. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we get an update from journalist Maria Goodavage, whose previous books include "Soldier Dogs: The Untold Story of America's Canine Heroes" and "Top Dog: The Story of Marine Hero Lucca." She actually spoke with us about six months ago, when her latest book was published.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in November.) News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest has some interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers.

Our guest is Teresa Miller, the local author and Director Emerita of the Center for Poets and Writers at OSU. Miller is also the co-editor of a new anthology, which she tells us about: "Love Can Be: A Literary Collection about Our Animals." It's a gathering of about thirty acclaimed authors, all of them celebrating pets, animals, creatures, and other forms of life: cats, birds, frogs, butterflies, bears, dogs, raccoons, horses, etc.

News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest on ST has some very interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers. Schötz has a new book out called "The Secret Language of Cats: How to Understand Your Cat for a Better, Happier Relationship."

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with Kay Stout, the executive director of the Peaceful Animal Adoption Shelter (or "PAAS") in Vinita, Oklahoma. This important and award-winning nonprofit, which opened in 2015, is, as noted at its website, "dedicated to the rescue, temporary care, and adoption of homeless and unwanted cats and dogs."

(Note: This show originally aired back in March.) Our guest is Kim Brophey, a nationally certified and award-winning canine behavior consultant based in Asheville, North Carolina. She joins us to discuss her book, "Meet Your Dog: The Game-Changing Guide to Understanding Your Dog's Behavior." In this work, Brophey explains her so-called "L.E.G.S." approach -- as in, "Learning, Environment, Genetics, and Self."

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Cat Warren, a university professor and former journalist who for several years had an admittedly strange hobby -- that is, she and her German shepherd, Solo, would often go searching for the dead. Solo, now retired, was a cadaver dog -- and what began as an effort to make the best of Solo's unruly energy and boundless enthusiasm eventually became, for our guest today, a quest to learn all she could about so-called "working" dogs, their handlers, and their trainers.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Cat Warren, a university professor and former journalist who for several years had an admittedly strange hobby -- that is, she and her German shepherd, Solo, would often go searching for the dead. Solo, now retired, was a cadaver dog -- and what began as an effort to make the best of Solo's unruly energy and boundless enthusiasm eventually became, for our guest today, a quest to learn all she could about so-called "working" dogs, their handlers, and their trainers.

Several studies have shown links existing between acts of cruelty toward animals and violence toward human beings -- and it's hardly surprising that 31 states in the U.S. as well as the District of Columbia now recommend (or else mandate) judges to require counseling for persons convicted of animal cruelty. The aforesaid "links" -- and working to end both of these crimes -- are what we're discussing on today's ST. AniCare of Oklahoma, a local grassroots group sponsored by the nonprofit Oklahoma Alliance for Animals, will soon host a two-day AniCare Seminar here in Tulsa.