Philbrook Museum of Art

Many people have been incorrectly praised as a "Renaissance Man," but the phrase perfectly describes Mr. John Lurie. Music, acting, painting, writing -- Lurie has really done it all. And he's nowhere near finished creating things. With a long-gestating memoir just being published and a second season of HBO's "Painting with John" now in production, the indie legend kindly agreed to join us recently for a wide-ranging chat.

[image via TheArtNewspaper.com]

Welcome to Season 6 of the Museum Confidential podcast, a co-production of Philbrook Museum of Art and Public Radio Tulsa. Our first episode begins with some basic yet far-reaching questions. What is an "outsider artist"? And do we even call them that anymore? In recent years, the term has shifted to "self-taught artist." Sounds different, but does it mean the same thing? And what about "folk art" -- when does this term apply? We're pleased to chat with Dr. Katherine Jentleson, the Merrie and Dan Boone Curator of Folk and Self-Taught Art at the High Museum in Atlanta.

Philbrook Museum of Art will host an exhibition next year featuring works of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo and her partner, Diego Rivera. 

"Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Mexican Modernism" is made up of pieces from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection. Philbrook President and CEO Scott Stulen said the exhibit’s 150-plus items have recently been on an international tour.

Our guest is the acclaimed African-American artist Lonnie Holley, born in Alabama in 1950, who has three pieces now on view at Philbrook in that museum's "From the Limitations of Now" exhibit, which closes on September 5th. Known for his mixed-media and found-and-discarded-object art pieces, Holley is also an "experimental blues" musician who's made several albums. He will perform with his band tomorrow night (Friday the 3rd) at Philbrook's garden space, beginning at 7pm.

Rick Lowe

May 10, 2021

Rick Lowe is one of the two Lead Artists for the Greenwood Art Project alongside William Cordova. Born in Alabama, but a longtime resident of Houston, Lowe's work is widely acclaimed and collected. He was awarded a coveted MacArthur "Genius Grant" in 2014. On this episode we chat with Lowe about the ongoing work of the Greenwood Art Project and the upcoming centennial of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Hosted by Jeff Martin with Philbrook Museum of Art and produced with Public Radio Tulsa.   

On this episode we road trip to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art to chat with Associate Curator, Allison Glenn. "Promise, Witness, Remembrance" at Louisville, Kentucky's Speed Art Museum, guest-curated by Glenn, reflects on the life of Breonna Taylor, her killing in 2020, and the year of protests that followed. The exhibition is organized around the three words of its title, which emerged from a conversation between Glenn and Tamika Palmer, Breonna's mother.

Serae Avance (American, b. 1993). Knowledge and Struggle, 2021. Digital pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. Copyright Serae Avance.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a show that recently opened at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. "From the Limitations of Now" will be on view through September 5th.

Philbook Museum of Art

TheRese Aduni has been hard at work on her documentary, "Rebuilding Black Wall Street." The film uses 16mm film footage shot by TheRese's father and chronicles the men and women who rebuilt Greenwood in the aftermath of 1921. This episode also features artist William Cordova, one of the Greenwood Art Project's two lead artists. Co-hosted by GAP Project Director, Jerica Wortham.

The Godfather of Cool

Mar 5, 2021
Philbook Museum of Art

2021 marks the 50th anniversary of the classic crime film SHAFT, directed Gordon Parks. Parks was a filmmaker, writer, musician, and one of the 20th century’s great photographers. A recent piece in the New York Times called him, “The Godfather of Cool.” Not bad for the youngest of 15 children from Fort Scott, Kansas. Fort Scott is now home to the Gordon Parks Museum. On this episode we catch up with the Museum’s Director, Kirk Sharp.

The Godfather of Cool

Mar 5, 2021
Philbook Museum of Art

2021 marks the 50th anniversary of the classic crime film SHAFT, directed Gordon Parks. Parks was a filmmaker, writer, musician, and one of the 20th century’s great photographers. A recent piece in the New York Times called him, “The Godfather of Cool.” Not bad for the youngest of 15 children from Fort Scott, Kansas. Fort Scott is now home to the Gordon Parks Museum. On this episode we catch up with the Museum’s Director, Kirk Sharp.

A new season of Museum Confidential begins in partnership with the Greenwood Art Project, an initiative of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission. To get a broader view of the project, host Jeff Martin speaks with anthropologist/archivist Marlon Hall who handles the project’s unique use of social media, Kode Ransom who runs the GAP mobile outreach efforts, and Program Director, Jerica Wortham. Jerica will serve as Co-Host on several Museum Confidential episodes this season.

Our guest is Christina Burke, the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. She tells us about an exciting new show at the museum, "Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists," which is now on view for members only -- and which will open to the public on Wednesday the 7th. As noted the Philbrook website: "Women have long been the creative force behind Native art.

On this installment of ST, we share a Museum Confidential podcast from our archives that feels especially timely, given what's going these days across the nation and, indeed, all over the world. The podcast episode is from the fall of 2018, when we spoke with Dr. David Pilgrim, founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State University in Michigan. This museum was born out of his personal collection, one that began decades ago, when Dr. Pilgrim was growing up in Alabama. Also on our program, commentator Mark Darrah offers "The Next Bus to Nome."

Jerry Saltz

May 5, 2020

There was a moment when critics held much more central place in American culture. Film critics, book critics, art critics. Weknew their names. They were tastemakers. Trusted sources. Now in the age of rotten tomatoes and likes, we’re all critics. But a rarified few have transcended the trends and held onto a corner of the zeitgeist. No American critic has been better at that than New York magazine’s Pulitzer Prize winning art critic, Jerry Saltz. In his new book HOW TO BE AN ARTIST, he distills his life into a mission statement of sorts.

Broad Strokes

Apr 21, 2020

It's not breaking news to say that women artists have often been ignored or even purposefully excluded from the canon. As we continue celebrating the 100th anniversary of passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, we sit down with acclaimed author Bridget Quinn to discuss her book, "Broad Strokes: 15 Women Who Made Art and Made History (in That Order)."

Produced by Jeff Martin with Philbrook Museum of Art.

In a special episode we air an important conversation hosted by museum engagement company, Cuseum. More than 3,000 museum professionals around the globe tuned in to “How to Keep Your Audience Engaged, Entertained, and Inspired in the Age of Coronavirus.” Featuring Philbrook Director Scott Stulen and Seema Rao, Deputy Director and Chief Experience Officer at Akron Art Museum. Moderated by Cuseum’s Brendan Ciecko.

The Scientific Method

Mar 13, 2020

Art museums actually account for less than 5% of all American museums. More than half of our museums fall into the history category. And while science and technology museums barely make up 1% of the overall industry, they host millions of annual visitors. On this episode of MC, we travel to the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas to look at the why and how of these museums.

Metropolitan Stories

Feb 28, 2020
Courtesy

This year marks the 150th anniversary of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Christine Coulson worked at The Met for a quarter of a century in a variety of roles. She left a couple of years ago to write full time, and the result is her acclaimed debut novel, “Metropolitan Stories.” On this episode of MC, we chat with Coulson about the real stories behind her fictional world. 

Year of the Woman

Feb 15, 2020

    The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, giving American women the right to vote. Last fall, the Baltimore Museum of Art announced a bold initiative, which was inspired by the fact that only 4% of the museum's 95,000 artworks have been created by women. Throughout this year, every artwork the museum purchases will have been created by a woman artist. On this episode, we travel to Baltimore for a chat with BMA Director, Christopher Bedford.

Commons Wikipedia

There’s a bit of a trend happening in the museum world. Museums are unionizing. And while this trend is somewhat isolated to New York and California, it’s a development that can’t be ignored. One of the museums to recently organize is the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan. On this episode we chat with Andres Puerta, Director of Special Projects for IUOE Local 30. 

In a special report, we speak with New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Zachary Small about their bombshell investigation into 31-year-old (now former) Erie Art Museum Director, Joshua Helmer, and his related sexual harassment scandals at that institution and at his previous job: the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Hosted by Jeff Martin with Philbrook Museum of Art and produced by Scott Gregory with Public Radio Tulsa.    

Colleen Dilenschneider

Jan 10, 2020

One name keeps popping up as one of the most important younger voices on the future of museums. That name is Colleen Dilenschneider. Through short videos, presentations, and data driven articles at her website, Colleen consistently boils down industry studies and presents them in a digestible, reliably optimistic way. Think of a museum-focused Malcolm Gladwell...who's a giddy millennial. On this episode of MC, we chat with Colleen about that future she’s always talking about.

Courtesy

2019 marks the 60th anniversary (October 1959) of New York’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The Guggenheim was the final and perhaps crowning achievement of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This year is also the 60th anniversary of Wright’s death (April 1959). All these decades later, the legendary architect remains a complicated figure.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer another edition of the popular Museum Confidential podcast, which is co-created twice a month by Jeff Martin with Philbrook Museum and Scott Gregory with Public Radio Tulsa. This time around, MC looks back to May of 2018, when -- at Christie's in Hong Kong -- an 18th-century Chinese vase owned by Philbrook sold for $14.5 million. MC sets out to learn the full story behind this potentially controversial sale.

Photo courtesy of Christie's Hong Kong.

Museums acquire. They keep. They care for their objects. And it always causes a bit of a stir when a museum decides to sell something from its collection. In May of 2018, at Christie’s in Hong Kong, an 18th-century Chinese vase owned by Philbrook Museum of Art sold for $14.5 million. On this episode, we chat with Philbrook Director Scott Stulen to learn the full story behind this potentially controversial decision. 

Edward Hopper Was Here

Nov 22, 2019

The name "Edward Hopper" is almost synonymous with loneliness. Hotels and motels play a central role in Hopper’s art. EDWARD HOPPER AND THE AMERICAN HOTEL recently opened at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. It's the first in-depth look at this side of Hopper’s work and features a recreated room based on Hopper’s “Western Motel.” The space serves as a fully functional hotel room. On this episode of MC, we chat with the show’s curator, Dr. Leo Mazow.

Edward Hopper Was Here

Nov 22, 2019

The name "Edward Hopper" is almost synonymous with loneliness. Hotels and motels play a central role in Hopper’s art. EDWARD HOPPER AND THE AMERICAN HOTEL recently opened at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. It's the first in-depth look at this side of Hopper’s work and features a recreated room based on Hopper’s “Western Motel.” The space serves as a fully functional hotel room. On this episode of MC, we chat with the show’s curator, Dr. Leo Mazow.

Building Stories

Nov 4, 2019

Sometimes a place becomes a museum by accident. This takes a combination of history, people, luck, notoriety, and (of course) art. One of the best examples of this rare occurrence is the legendary Chelsea Hotel in New York City. Acclaimed author Fiona Davis writes novels about famous New York buildings. She recently wrote one about the Chelsea Hotel, so we checked in with her to talk about it. 

Springsteen’s Stuff

Oct 20, 2019

Bruce Springsteen just turned 70. But The Boss shows no signs of slowing down. In his hometown of Freehold, New Jersey, there’s a new exhibition at the Monmouth County Historical Association. It’s called, quite simply, SPRINGSTEEN: HIS HOMETOWN. On this episode, we're talking all things Bruce with Eileen Chapman, Director of The Bruce Springsteen Archives and Center for American Music at Monmouth University.

 

On this edition of ST, we present a new installmwent in our popular Museum Confidential podcast series (which just began its third season). This time out, we learn about a **new** book from Dr. Seuss, which is just out, and which is based on an unfinished collection of notes and sketches that the brillitant children's book author and illustrator (who died in 1991) left behind in a drawer. The book, called "The Horse Museum," is a love letter to museums as well as a primer on art history.

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