Philbrook Museum of Art

On this edition of ST, we're discussing a special exhibit that's set to open at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa over the weekend. Indeed, it's Philbrook's first-ever exhibition of works by Claude Monet (1840-1926), the widely admired and highly influential Fresh Impressionist. "Monet and the Seine: Impressions of a River" opens on Sunday the 29th and runs through September 21, 2014.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of the distinctive films of writer/director Wes Anderson, whose vivid, detailed, and meticulously crafted movies include "Rushmore," "The Royal Tenenbaums," "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou," and "Moonrise Kingdom" --- as well as "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is still in theaters nationwide. Our guest is Matt Zoller Seitz, a critic for New York magazine who has a new book out about Anderson's decidedly ornate cinematic world.

Once upon a time, museums throughout this country would invariably display or organize their "art" and their "Native American art" in two distinct categories; a piece would "belong" to one or the other camp, but never both. That's increasingly not the case anymore, thankfully --- and our guest today talks about why. We're pleased to welcome Rick West back to ST; he'll be the keynote speaker for a day-long Native Art Symposium tomorrow (Saturday the 5th) at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa.

"Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec --- Album" is a richly varied and lovely-to-look-at exhibition on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa through May 11th. As we read of this show at the Philbrook website: "Design is a complex process in which numerous problems must be solved. Yet even in the age of computers, drawing remains an indispensable tool for many designers, allowing them to capture spontaneous ideas on paper and develop an individual formal language.

Ever flipped through a box of old photographs at a flea market --- or perhaps a soon-to-be-discarded album of family photos at a garage sale --- and then stopped to wonder, at some point, about a certain image: "Who are these people? Where did this come from? Who took this?

On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Dr. Richard Kurin, the Smithsonian Institution's Under Secretary for History, Art, and Culture, who oversees most of the organization's various museums as well as many of its educational programs. An anthropologist and cultural historian by training, and a former Fulbright fellow with a doctorate from the University of Chicago, Dr.

Back in 1938, the legendary local oilman Waite Phillips announced that he was giving his Italianate mansion --- and its surrounding 20-plus acres of uniformly gorgeous grounds --- to the citizens of Tulsa as an art museum and park space. Today, as has been the case all along, the Philbrook Museum of Art is an important and truly unique aspect of the art scene not just in our community but throughout this part of the nation.

On today's StudioTulsa, we speak with Catherine Whitney, chief curator of the Philbrook Museum of Art, about the first two exhibitions at the museum's new Brady District facility. Philbrook Downtown is currently featuring a pair of exhibits concerning American art. The first, which was curated by Whitney, examines a group of female painters who worked in Santa Fe and Taos in the early 20th Century. "Sirens of the Southwest" draws on the resources of Philbrook's Eugene B.

On this installment of ST, we are joined by Lauren Ross, the Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about a group show now on exhibit at the museum, "Remainder," which will run through September 29th.

This weekend --- beginning Friday the 14th --- the Tulsa community will welcome Philbrook Downtown, a new satellite space of the Philbrook Museum of Art, which was founded in 1938 and opened in 1939. Philbrook Downtown is a 30,000-square-foot, modern-style facility located in the city's vibrant Brady Arts District; it's comprised in a brick building that formerly housed a historic warehouse, and it's situated just steps away from several other newly created arts/cultural institutions in downtown Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, a discussion of both the art and craft of making books. Our guest is Jody Williams, a Minneapolis-based book artist, printmaker, teacher, and writer. The (mostly miniature-sized) books that she creates as individual works of art appear under the name Flying Paper Press; books created by Williams have appeared in exhibits all over the country, and some are included in a group show currently on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art (through July 21st) called About Bookworks III.

"Aphrodite and the Gods of Love" at Philbrook

Mar 20, 2013

Our guest for this edition of ST is Tanya Paul, the Ruth G. Hardman Curator of European Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about "Aphrodite and the Gods of Love." It's a terrific new show that will be on view at Philbrook through May 26th.

The widely praised "Models & Muses: Max Weber and the Figure" exhibit at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa will close on February 3rd. On this installment of ST, we revisit this terrific show --- the first museum survey of Weber's work in two decades, and an exhibition which originated at Philbrook --- in order to explore one aspect of Weber's long and influential career in American modern art. Namely, that aspect is his relationship with Mark Rothko, the pioneering abstract painter who, while still a young man, was briefly a student of Weber's in the middle 1920s.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Catherine Whitney, who's been the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa for the past couple of years now.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion that first aired in July, when we spoke with Lauren Ross, the Nancy E. Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. At that time, Philbrook had just opened an exhibition called "Antibodies: The Works of Fernando and Humberto Campana, 1989-2009." That show will close on Sunday the 7th.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Teddy Cruz, the acclaimed architect and scholar --- he's an associate professor of Public Culture and Urbanism in the Visual Arts Department at the University of California, San Diego --- who will appear at a "Third Thursday" event at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa tomorrow night (the 16th) at 6pm. A 2010 profile of Cruz that appeared in T: The New York Times Style Magazine --- in which he was named as one of "the Nifty 50: America's up-and-coming talent" --- begins like so: "Most architects live to build.

On this encore edition of ST, we listen back to a conversation with Amy Wells, a Hollywood-based set decorator who's worked on several outstanding films and TV series over the years, among them the television programs "House," "Love Field," and "Mad Men," as well as the motion pictures "Clueless," "There Will Be Blood," and "A Single Man." Wells did an event here in Tulsa (at the Philbrook Museum of Art) back in May; at that time, she stopped by our studios to talk about her interesting work on AMC's "Mad Men" --- a critically acclaimed show that's routinely praised as much for its costumes

On this installment of our program, we speak with Lauren Ross, the Nancy E. Meinig Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Philbrook has just opened a fascinating exhibition called "Antibodies: The Works of Fernando and Humberto Campana, 1989-2009," which will be on view through October 7th of this year. As Ross explains, this show originated at the Vitra Design Museum in Germany; it's the first of three exhibits from that museum which Philbrook will present over the next few years.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Derry Noyes, an art diretor and graphic designer with the US Postal Service (you can read her bio here). Noyes was the art director a series of Forever US Postage stamps created in 2011 to salute such pioneering American industrial designers as Norman Bel Geddes, Russell Wright, Henry Dreyfuss, and Walter Dorwin Teague.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Amy Wells, a Hollywood-based set decorator who's worked on several outstanding films and TV series over the years, among them the television programs "House," "Love Field," and "Mad Men," as well as the motion pictures "Clueless," "There Will Be Blood," and "A Single Man." Wells will speak this evening (Thursday the 17th) at 7pm at the Philbrook Museum of Art; her appearance is a part of the museum's ongoing "Third Thursday" series.

On today's ST, we speak with Christina Burke, Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Burke assembled an exhibit which opened at the museum earlier this month, and which is on view through June 3rd, called "Seeking the Sacred: Religious Ritual in Native American Art." It's a show that mainly draws on Philbrook's world-famous collection of 20th-century Native American paintings.

On today's StudioTulsa, we listen back to an interview that first aired in November. At that time, we spoke with Lark Mason, an Asian art expert and longtime appraiser for "Antiques Roadshow," the popular public television program. Earlier last year, during an "Antiques Roadshow" taping here in Tulsa in July, Mason had valued a set of five 17th-century Chinese rhinoceros horn cups --- the property of Tulsa resident Doug Huber, who started collecting them in 1969 while on vacation in England (and who spent about $5,000 on acquiring them, over the years) --- at $1 to $1.5 million.

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