Real Estate and Housing

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Days after volunteers helped move the last residents out of a condemned apartment complex, the Tulsa City Council announced a new working group to look into potential policy solutions.

Councilor Phil Lakin says the Residential Rental Property Habitability Working Group is not meant to go after the 90% of landlords he believes are doing right by their tenants.

Another round of emergency rental assistance funding is on its way to Tulsa.

The city is receiving a $3.8 million initial disbursement from a total award of $9.5 million in the American Rescue Plan. The new funding is on top of $12 million in a previous coronavirus relief package to help pay late rent and utilities. 

City COVID Relief Funds Manager Alisa Dougless said the guidance for the new funds is less restrictive.

Lori Decter Wright

The City of Tulsa and housing nonprofits are still trying to relocate residents of an apartment complex near 61st and Memorial a city councilor described as being like a "third-world" country.

Lori Decter Wright

The plight of more than 100 families at a south Tulsa apartment complex has caught the attention of local elected officials.

Vista Shadow Mountain got on the city’s radar over an unpaid water bill of more than $108,000. The entire complex could be shut down Thursday over the bill, which management has not paid while collecting utility fees from residents.

City Councilor Lori Decter Wright visited the complex near 61st and Memorial over the weekend and said the problem is much bigger: Her constituents living there are experiencing third-world conditions.

Courtesy

Plans are on hold to remake a south Tulsa hotel into a development that includes a hotel, apartments targeted to older veterans and daytime senior care.

Veteran Services USA withdrew their application for the project hours before a city council vote on it this week, saying they wanted to allow more time for discussions with the community.

The nonprofit tasked with administering an Emergency Rental Assistance Program in Tulsa and 19 other Oklahoma counties has distributed more than $4 million the past two months.

Restore Hope Ministries has given out $4.3 million since April 9. Executive Director Rev. Jeff Jaynes said over the 12 preceding months of the pandemic, Restore Hope gave out $4 million dollars, and that was an enormous increase over their typical levels of financial assistance.

On this edition of ST, we learn about how homeowners in the Greater Tulsa area can take simple steps -- in both their lawncare and their gardening practices -- to improve and preserve the quality of our local water, land, and ecology. The Yard By Yard Community Resiliency Project is an initiative of the Oklahoma Conservation Commission; the project started in OKC and is now happening in Tulsa.

Flickr user rickonine / Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Updated May 6, 10:10 a.m.  

Thousands of Oklahomans could be affected by a federal judge's ruling Wednesday that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lacked authority to issue a national eviction moratorium.

U.S. District Judge Dabney Friedrich issued a stay of her order until at least May 16, when the Department of Justice's filings to appeal the ruling are due. That means people who have filed for protection under the moratorium can stay in their homes for now.

Oklahoma Housing Market Reflects Nationwide Shortage

Apr 29, 2021

There is a record lack of homes for sale in the United States and prices are soaring. In Oklahoma it isn’t much different. Statewide there are 50% less homes for sale than last year and the average home price has increased 15%.

 

A metric used by the National Association of Realtors measures whether a market is better for buyers or sellers by estimating the time it would take to sell out of available homes. Six months of supply is considered a neutral market. Less than six months is considered a seller's market. In Oklahoma inventory is slightly less than two months.

City of Tulsa

The City of Tulsa launched a new program Monday to reward landlords who are trying to help with an affordable housing crunch. 

Another round of emergency rental assistance is available for Tulsa County residents.

The City of Tulsa and Tulsa County have chosen Restore Hope Ministries to administer a combined $19.6 million in federal aid from the relief package signed into law by President Donald Trump in late December to people in danger of eviction because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Executive Director Jeff Jaynes said the need remains deep.

A program offering remote workers $10,000 to move to Tulsa is trying something new.

New Tulsa Remote participants can ask for the full cash grant upfront to put toward buying a house.

Rental Realities

A state House committee approved a bill on Wednesday that would prevent courts from halting evictions, even during a health emergency like the COVID-19 pandemic.

House Bill 1564 says courts have no discretion to extend terms of a lease. Some supporters, including bill author Rep. Tom Gann (R-Inola), said they’ve talked to landlords with tenants who simply refused to pay because they couldn’t be evicted during a federal moratorium.

The City of Tulsa’s Working In Neighborhoods Department is working on a plan to help guard against substandard rental housing.

It would accomplish goals of a landlord licensing program recommended by the city’s affordable housing strategy released in 2019. WIN Director Dwain Midget said they’re calling it a rental certificate of occupancy.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

The City of Tulsa could soon adopt a new special taxing district that benefits residents directly rather than a developer or company.

The plan calls for four distinct tax increment financing, or TIF, districts at the Peoria Mohawk Business Park, with one encompassing Muncie Power Products truck part plant to be activated immediately. Officials estimate the TIFs will bring in $42.6 million over the next 25 to 35 years.

Our guest is Dan Alexander, a senior editor at Forbes Magazine, who joins us to discuss his new book, "White House, Inc." It's an in-depth investigation into President Trump's business holdings, and into how he used the highest office in the land to enrich these holdings. In order to document the president's endeavors to make money from his office, the book examines his exclusive clubs, luxury hotels, overseas partnerships, commercial properties, and personal mansions.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis.

Pixabay

The City of Tulsa has established a major piece of its four-year strategy to address a shortage of affordable housing.

It seeded an affordable housing trust fund with $4 million from a downtown revolving loan fund and has set a goal of raising up to $20 million. City Housing Policy Director Becky Gligo said that won’t cover all 4,000 units needed.

Tulsa County Commissioners approved on Monday an initial $3 million for local housing assistance due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Tulsa Housing Authority will administer the program, which should start late next month. THA President and CEO Aaron Darden said funds will be available to Tulsa County residents who are having trouble paying their rent or mortgage because of the pandemic, hopefully helping them stave off eviction.

City-Data.com

Updated July 27, 1:05 p.m. with a link to the study. 

The City of Tulsa has its playbook for how to help add thousands of housing units in and around downtown.

The downtown housing study recommends seven strategies to help boost the stock of rental and for-sale housing, especially for less than $2,000 a month.

On this edition of ST, a discussion from our archives. In 2017, we spoke with Richard Rothstein, a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

The current pandemic has brought keen economic hardship, of course, to a vast number of individials and families within various levels of American society. Given that so many folks who rent a house or apartment in our community now require extra time to acquire their unemployment checks and/or federal benefits, the Tulsa City Council voted unanimously last night to ask Gov. Stitt for a statewide moratorium on evictions. In addition to this, Tulsa County has historically had one of the highest rates of eviction in the country.

Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis. His book moreover shows how the imperialism, racism, and capitalism that have defined the city have likewise defined our nation's history.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the City of Tulsa's in-depth and multifaceted efforts to address issues of resilience, equity, and racial disparity across various demographic and geographic sections of our community. Our guest is DeVon Douglass, who was recently appointed by Mayor G.T. Bynum as Tulsa's Chief Resilience Officer. Before this appointment, Douglass served as the Economic Opportunity and Poverty Policy Analyst for the Oklahoma Policy Institute.

On this edition of our show, we learn all about Kendall Whittier, Incorporated, or KWI, which is a neighborhood-minded and long-running nonprofit now marking its 50th Anniversary. KWI is, per its website, "a home-grown organization incorporating self-sufficiency for our neighbors through food security, nutritional health, and well-being." KWI -- the only food pantry in the Tulsa area that actually delivers to its participants' doorsteps -- will host an event tonight (Thursday the 7th) in celebartion of its Golden Anniversary.

On this installment of ST, our guest is Cameron Walker, the Executive Director of Tulsa Habitat for Humanity (or THFH). This crucial nonprofit recently received a $6.7 million grant from the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, and therefore, as we learn on today's program, THFH is transitioning from building 25 to 30 houses per year (which is what it does in the Tulsa area currently) to building 150 houses per year (which is what it aims to be doing four years from now).

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a discussion from July with Richard Rothstein, who is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a detailed discussion of how being "housing insecure" can seriously and negatively affect an individual's -- or a community's -- health and well-being. Our guest is Dr. Megan Sandel of Boston Medical Center, who is also an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Richard Rothstein, who is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

(Note: This interview originally aired in July.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with Amy Haimerl, a professor of journalism at Michigan State University who writes about small business and urban policy for Fortune, Reuters, The New York Times, and other outlets.

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