Reconstruction (in US History)

On this episode of ST, we revisit a discussion that first aired back in October. At that time, we spoke with Eric Foner, the DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University.

Our guest is Eric Foner, the DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University, who is a Pulitzer Prize–winning scholar and one of the most prominent historians in the United States. He'll give the free-to-the-public 23rd Annual John W. Hager Distinguished Lecture at the TU College of Law (at 3120 East 4th Place) on October 17th. (The reception for this event is at 5:30pm; the lecture begins at 6pm.) Prof.

(Note: This show originally aired back in February.) Our guest is the novelist Margaret Verble. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Cherokee America." Set on the American frontier in the spring of 1875, and specifically in the Cherokee Nation -- which would later be part of Oklahoma -- this novel follows a series of complex family alliances and cultural and racial clashes in the aftermath of the Civil War. It's a vivid (and often funny) novel of blood relations and home lands, of buried histories and half-told truths, and of past grief and present-day harm.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

Our guest is the novelist Margaret Verble. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Cherokee America." Set on the American frontier in the spring of 1875, and specifically in the Cherokee Nation -- which would later be part of Oklahoma -- this novel follows a series of complex family alliances and cultural and racial clashes in the aftermath of the Civil War. It's a vivid (and often funny) novel of blood relations and home lands, of buried histories and half-told truths, and of past grief and present-day harm.

On this installment of ST, a discussion of the history of race relations in America -- and of a landmark Supreme Court decision that profoundly shaped this history. Steve Luxenberg is our guest; he is a longtime senior editor at The Washington Post, and his new book is "Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation." As Louis Menand of The New Yorker Magazine has noted: "Luxenberg has chosen a fresh way to tell the story of Plessy.... 'Separate' is deeply researched, and it wears its learning lightly. It's a storytelling kind of book....

Our guest on ST is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.