Revolutionary War

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the University of Maryland historian Dr. Richard Bell, who will give a free-with-museum-admission talk this coming Sunday afternoon (the 8th) at Gilcrease titled "HAMILTON: How the Musical Remixes American History." Lin-Manuel Miranda's Tony-winning musical, which is now playing at the Tulsa PAC, is surely among the most popular works to hit Broadway in recent memory...but how, well, historically accurate is it?

Got your "Hamilton" tickets yet...or did you already see it? The smash-hit Broadway musical is now beginning the second week of its run at the Tulsa PAC. And so we're offering a course in Hamilton 101 on today's ST as we listen back to a 2003 interview with the author and historian Willard Sterne Randall. At the time, Randall had just put out "Alexander Hamilton: A Life."

On this edition of ST, we listen back to our discussion with the bestselling historian Nathaniel Philbrick about his book, "In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at  Yorktown." We spoke with him last year, when the book first came out; it's now appearing in a paperback edition. As was noted by The Wall Street Journal: "[Philbrick], an accomplished popular historian...excels when writing about sailors and the ocean. He vividly renders the interplay of skill and chaos in naval combat by massive fleets, as well as the fury of hurricanes....

(Note: This interview originally aired in 2014.) Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis, who has written several well-regarded books on the events and persons concerning the founding of the United States. His fascinating book called "Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence" -- which he discusses with us today -- details two seminal events in the summer of 1776, both of them quite central to our nation's founding.

(Note: This interview originally aired in June of this year.) On this installment of our show, a conversation with the distinguished historian and scholar, Robert Middlekauff, who is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley.

On this installment of our show, a conversation with the distinguished historian and scholar, Robert Middlekauff, who is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley. Middlekauff -- whose earlier books include "The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596–1728," which won the Bancroft Prize, and "The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763–1789," which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize -- joins us to talk about his latest book, "Washington's Revolution: The Making of America's First Leader" (Knopf).

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis, who's written eight previous books on the events and persons concerning the founding of the United States. His most recent book, "Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence," details two seminal events in the summer of 1776 that are central to our nation's founding. Of course, the actions of the Continental Congress in Philadelphia (resulting in the signing of the Declaration of Independence) is one.