Rock Music

Photo via WoodViolins.com

On this edition of ST, we meet the rock/classical/crossover electric violinist, Mark Wood, who will perform with the Bartlesville Symphony Orchestra on Saturday the 9th, beginning at 7:30pm.

Photo via 108 Contemporary

On this edition of ST, we learn about a soon-to-open exhibition at 108 Contemporary Gallery in downtown Tulsa; "A Luthier's Tale: The Craft of Stringed Instruments" will be on view from July 2nd through September 19th. Our guest is Benjamin Liggett, a luthier (i.e., a maker of stringed instruments) based here in Tulsa who's also the guest curator for this show. Per the 108 Contemporary website, this exhibit is "dedicated to the art, craft, and design of stringed instruments.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Prof. Sean Latham, the Pauline McFarlin Walter Endowed Chair of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Tulsa, where he also serves as editor of the James Joyce Quarterly, founding director of the Oklahoma Center for the Humanities, and director of the TU Institute for Bob Dylan Studies. In this last-named capacity, Prof.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) We're pleased to welcome our friend John Wooley back to StudioTulsa. A longtime Tulsa-based music and pop-culture writer -- and the host, of course, of the popular Swing on This program, heard every Saturday night here on KWGS -- Wooley is the co-author, along with Brett Bingham, of a new book about the historic Cain's Ballroom.

Our guest on ST is Brian Horton, president of the non-profit Horton Records, which is a Tulsa-based indie record label dedicated to documenting, promoting, and growing our local and regional music scene.

We're pleased to welcome our friend John Wooley back to StudioTulsa. A longtime Tulsa-based music and pop-culture writer -- and the host, of course, of the popular Swing on This program, heard every Saturday night here on KWGS -- Wooley is the co-author, along with Brett Bingham, of a new book about the historic Cain's Ballroom.

Looking for new tunes to check out as you pass away all those homebound hours of late? We have some great tips on this edition of ST as we welcome Julie Watson to our show. She's long been a fixture of Tulsa's local music scene, writing about musicians and bands, presenting concerts, promoting new and emerging artists, and so forth. Watson formerly hosted a fine public-radio show on another station, "Tune In Tulsa," which mixed great conversations with compelling playlists, and she's also a fomrer co-producer of the OK Roots Music Series.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Brad James, the veteran Tulsa-based singer-songwriter (and ace guitarist) who emerged from the fertile Stillwater, Oklahoma, music scene of the 1980s and '90s. A mighty fine new album, "At Fellowship Hall," has just been released by the Brad James Band. Please note that there will be an Album Release Party for this new recording tomorrow night, Saturday the 1st, at Soul City in Tulsa (on 11th Street). The event begins at 9pm, and other well-regarded local musicians are on the bill as well.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Michael Chaiken, curator of the Tulsa-based Bob Dylan Archive (and of the forthcoming, in 2021, Bob Dylan Center). He tells us about an art exhibit that he recently assembled which is now on view at the Gilcrease Museum: "Bob Dylan: Face Value and Beyond" is on display through September 15th.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about Tulsa Little Jam, a popular podcast, concert series, and far-reaching digital media platform that aims to spotlight our community's most talented musicians and singer-songwriters. Tulsa Little Jam will present its Season Two Opening Concert this coming Friday night, the 17th, at Guthrie Green (beginning at 5:30pm). A number of different local bands will be presented -- and filmed -- in live performance, and the concert will be part of the 2019 Mayfest weekend.

Our guest today on ST is Jeffrey Zeigler, the well-regarded cellist who is known for his work with Philip Glass, Yo-Yo Ma, John Zorn, Kronos Quartet, Laurie Anderson, and others. A supremely gifted "crossover" musician whose work draws upon classical, jazz, pop, rock, folk, and a variety of other sources, Zeigler will soon perform here in Tulsa. His concert, presented by Choregus Productions, happens at the Tulsa PAC's Doenges Theater on Friday the 25th.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Tamara Lebak, a Tulsa-based executive coach, organizational development consultant, and minister. She's also an accomplsihed singer-songwriter in the folk/roots/blues/alt-country manner, and she joins us to discuss her new album: "The Psalms Project: Volume 1." As Lebak has written of herself and her music online: "I'm a Universalist minister who believes that the Bible is ultimately about the relentless and persistent love of God.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're pleased to present another installment in our twice-monthly Museum Confidential podcast series (which is co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum and Scott Gregory of Public Radio Tulsa). This time around, MC chats with Bob Dylan Archive curator Michael Chaiken, who's based in both Brooklyn and Tulsa. He tells us how they're pretty much trying NOT to make a museum with the forthcoming Bob Dylan Center (to open in downtown Tulsa in 2021). At least, not a "museum" in the traditional sense of the term.

Our two guests on ST are the architects who will design the forthcoming Bob Dylan Center, which will be the "public face" of the Tulsa-based Bob Dylan Archives -- and which is slated to open in 2021 at the corner of MLK Blvd. and Archer Street. After a far-reaching, international competition, architect Tom Kundig (of the well-regarded, Seattle-based firm Olson Kundig) was chosen by the George Kaiser Family Foundation to design this exciting new public venue. Along with Mr.

Photo by John Cohen / Bob Dylan in 1962

On this edition of ST, we speak once again with Michael Chaiken, the curator of the Tulsa-based Bob Dylan Archive, which is currently located at the University of Tulsa's Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum, and which houses some 6,000 items related to Dylan's life and career in music -- nearly six decades of writings, recordings, memorabilia, film, and more. This facility is meant for researchers and scholars; it is not open to the public.

T. C. Cannon (1946–1978, Caddo/Kiowa), Small Catcher, 1973–78. Oil on canvas. Collection of Gil Waldman and Christy Vezolles. © 2018 Estate of T. C. Cannon. Courtesy of the Heard Museum, Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Craig Smith.

We learn about a striking show on view at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "T.C. Cannon: At the Edge of America" will run through October 7th of this year. It is, per the Gilcrease website, "the first major traveling exhibition of Cannon's work since 1990 and explores the dynamic creative range and legacy of an artist whose life was cut short at age 31.

Photo Credit: Miami Art Guide

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to chat with the world-renowned tabla virtuoso Zakir Hussain, who has performed or recorded over the years with everyone from George Harrison and Yo-Yo Ma to Van Morrison and Mickey Hart (to name but a few). On this coming Friday night, the 30th, the nonprofit South Asian Performing Arts Foundation will present a special concert featuring Mr. Hussain alongside Rakesh Chaurasia, an up-and-coming and well-respected flute virtuoso. The concert begins at 7:30pm in the John H. Williams Theatre at the Tulsa PAC.

On this edition of ST, we sit down with Todd Clouser and Chris Combs, two genre-busting guitarists and composers whose ever-creative music-making mixes jazz, rock, and funk styles -- as well as electronica, ambient grooves, and even tape-reversing experimentation. Clouser, originally from Minnesota and based in Mexico City, pretty much tours and performs worldwide -- and non-stop -- and has been occasionally playing shows in Tulsa for years now.

On this edition of ST, we learn about "Four Chords and a Gun," a newly created non-musical play that looks at the iconic punk band known as The Ramones -- and in particular, at their efforts to record an album with the eccentric yet legendary music producer, Phil Spector. The play was written by John Ross Bowie, an actor best known for his roles on TV's "Speechless" and "The Big Bang Theory." As we learn on today's show, "Four Chords and a Gun" focuses on the years 1979 and 1980, when The Ramones stood on the very edge of breaking into stardom.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Joseph Baldassare, a music producer and promoter who also oversees Arthouse 18, an organization that sets up photography exhibitions and sells high-quality prints at such exhibitions. Baldassare has just brought two closely-related photo exhibits to Tulsa, both of which will be on view at the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education throughout December.

Dylan went electric. Miles went electric. Everyone, it seems, has gone electric by now...but what about the world of classical music? How common is it to witness, say, an "amp'd up" chamber music trio? On this edition of ST, our guest is the noted Tulsa-based composer, musician, and music educator, Noam Faingold, who's also the curator of the upcoming OK Electric music festival. This festival will happen Friday and Saturday night, the 28th and 29th, at Living Arts of Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the Tulsa-based, volunteer-run, non-profit Horton Records, which began about five years ago, and which aims to -- as noted on its website -- "provide support and tools for band management, promotion, booking, merchandising, and distribution in order to help local and regional musicians fulfill their artistic goals and further promote local and regional music on a broader scale.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about the Bob Dylan Archive, that widely-reported-on treasure trove of 6,000+ items documenting the entirety of the legendary singer-songwriter's still-active career. This archive was purchased earlier this year by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and The University of Tulsa; it will be housed at TU's Helmerich Center for American Research (which is located within the Gilcrease Museum).

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an interesting discussion with the diversely talented Tulsa-based composer, performer, conductor, and music educator Noam Faingold. He serves as director of the Barthelmes Conservatory, teaches in the Department of Music at TU, is on the board at Chamber Music Tulsa, and is also the curator for the OK Electric Music Festival, which will happen this weekend (April 8th and 9th) at Living Arts of Tulsa (at 307 East Brady in downtown Tulsa).

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded Missouri-based printmaker, Tom Huck, who owns and operates a press called Evil Prints. Huck is known for his large-format, intricately detailed, and darkly humorous woodcuts -- many of which are also quite satirical or even raunchy -- that are inspired by the work of Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, as well as (much more recently) R. Crumb and various heavy-metal rock LP covers.

On today's ST, we learn about a new musical -- a "bro-mantic" comedy, no less -- loosely based on the thousand-year-old epic poem, "Beowulf." It's the still-in-development "Beowulf, Lord of the Bros," and it will be workshopped at a pair of free-to-the-public performances on Friday and Saturday, the 30th and 31st, at the Theatre Two space in Kendall Hall on the TU campus, with both shows starting at 7pm.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Julie Watson and Mike Koster, the co-directors of Tulsa Roots Music, a nonprofit and ongoing (and quite wonderful) concert series that first got underway here in our community about four years ago. On Saturday the 18th, the day-long Tulsa Roots Music Bash will be presented, for the second consecutive year, at the Guthrie Green in downtown Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the award-winning Canadian actor, playwright, and humorist Rick Miller, who will present his one-man show, "Boom," on Saturday the 20th at 7:30pm at the Tulsa PAC's Williams Theatre. As Miller tells us by phone, his 100-minute production offers a sweeping, fascinating, and maybe even educational exploration of the Baby Boomer generation -- from Che Guevara to Janis Joplin, from Buddy Holly to Nikita Khrushchev, and from Walter Cronkite to Martin Luther King, Jr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks by phone with Dr. David Schiedermayer, a reflective and soft-spoken physician/author who is based in Wisconsin, tells a good yarn, and has worked in the fields of medicine and health for many years now. He's been an internist and a hospitalist in the past, and he's now focused on palliative care. Oh, and he's also one heck of a harmonica player. In fact, Dr.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Christopher Bruce, the highly regarded British choreographer and dancer who served as Artistic Director of the Rambert Dance Company from 1994 until 2002. Bruce, whom London's Daily Telegraph once called "the Nureyev of contemporary ballet," was appointed Houston Ballet's Associate Choreographer in 1989, and this world-renowned company has served as his artistic home in America since then.