Severe weather

(Note: This interview originally aired back in October.) What's it like to live on one-tenth of the fossil-fuel consumption of the average American? Alarmed by the drastic changes now occurring in the Earth's climate systems, our guest on today's ST -- who is a climate scientist and father of two -- decided to find out. And he's very glad he did. Peter Kalmus is our guest; he is an atmospheric scientist at Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and he has a book out.

Our guest is the California-based seismologist, Dr. Lucy Jones, whose new book is "The Big Ones." It offers a bracing look at some of the history's greatest natural disasters, world-altering events whose reverberations we continue to feel today. At Pompeii, for example, Dr. Jones explores how a volcanic eruption in the first century AD challenged prevailing views of religion. Later in the book, she examines the California floods of 1862 and how they show that memory itself can change or fade over successive generations.

On this edition of ST, after the tornado activity we saw here in Tulsa earlier this month, we're talking about what local small businesses can do to protect themselves from damage caused by flooding, storms, tornadoes, and other natural disasters. Our guest is Dave Hall, Chair of the Disaster Resistant Business Council, which is a part of the Disaster Resilience Network (formerly known as Tulsa Partners).

Storm Damages 21 Homes in Comanche County

Aug 8, 2012

LAWTON, Okla. (AP) — Authorities say 21 homes in Comanche County were damaged by a summer storm that brought high winds and large hail.

The storm moved into the area Tuesday night and authorities said no one was injured. Lightning from the storm sparked a large grassfire at Fort Sill, but firefighters were able to contain the blaze.

The Lawton Constitution reports that plumes of smoke were visible among dark storm clouds Tuesday night. The fire was stopped near the Fort Sill landfill and crews created a fire break to keep the blaze contained.

File Photo

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Severe thunderstorms brought much-needed rainfall but unwelcome wind damage in parts of Oklahoma and Arkansas.

Winds gusting over 70 mph blew through parts of southern Oklahoma and winds of at least 60 mph were reported in western Arkansas Thursday. Authorities say there were no immediate reports of injuries, but some homes and trees were damaged.

National Weather Service-File photo

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The National Weather Service warns that flash flooding is likely in the Oklahoma City area Wednesday morning, while severe thunderstorms are possible in much of southern and central Oklahoma.

Wednesday's forecast comes after storms dropped enormous hail on the Oklahoma City area Tuesday night. The National Weather Service received preliminary reports of softball-sized hail or larger in the Kingfisher area.

No deaths were reported but authorities say a handful of people were injured by the large hailstones.

KWGS News File Photo

WOODWARD, Okla. (AP) — Officials in Woodward County say softball-sized hail caused an estimated $250,000 in damages after severe storms swept through the area Monday night, injuring three people.

Woodward County Emergency Manager Matt Lehenbauer says an infant was injured by glass from a shattered car window and another person was hit in the face by a softball-sized hail stone that broke through a car window.

Lehenbauer tells the Woodward News the storms caused at least a quarter-million dollars in damages to buildings and vehicles.