Sexuality

Our guest is Linda Kay Klein, whose detailed and engrossing new memoir looks at the devastating effects that evangelical Christianity's purity culture has had on a generation of young women in America. Back in the 1990s, the widespread white evangelical Christian culture created a "purity movement" of sorts -- purity rings, purity pledges, purity balls, etc. Girls were seen by this movement as potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could be judged as a corruption of her character.

On this installment of our show, an in-depth discussion with the novelist Tom Perrotta, whose books include "Election" and "Little Children" (both of which were made into well-regarded films). Perrotta has a new novel out, titled "Mrs. Fletcher," and he tells us about it on today's program. As was noted of this book in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "[This book], Perrotta's seventh novel and first since 2011's "The Leftovers," operates and succeeds in ways that will be pleasingly familiar to his admirers.

On this edition of ST, we are pleased to welcome the noted book critic, editor, and retired librarian Nancy Pearl back to our show. A former Tulsan, she's also the longtime book reviewer for this program, and she can be heard talking about books from time to time on NPR's Morning Edition. Nancy has a new novel out -- it's her first, and it's called "George and Lizzie" -- and it was thus praised by Booklist (in a starred review): "Pearl dramatizes a complicated and deeply illuminating union of opposites and conducts profound inquiries into the self, family, empathy, and love.

On our show today, a conversation with Micah Fitzerman-Blue, a writer and producer now living in Los Angeles who grew up in Tulsa and attended Holland Hall School (and later, Harvard University). He's probably best known as a writer and producer for the award-winning Amazon television show, "Transparent," starring Jeffrey Tambor and Gaby Hoffmann -- and his first feature film, "The Motel Life," appeared in 2013 and starred Dakota Fanning, Emile Hirsch, and Kris Kristopherson, winning both Best Screenplay and the Audience Award at the Rome Film Festival.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Isabel Sawhill, a senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, where she holds the Cabot Family Chair. Sawhill also serves as the co-director of the Center on Children and Families, and she's the board president of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. Her latest book is "Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage." Sawhill -- who appeared recently at an event here in Tulsa -- discusses this "important new book" (per Nicholas Kristoff of The New York Times) with us today.

This evening -- Monday the 1st, at 6:30pm -- Oklahomans for Equality and the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center will host a presentation by Dr. Perry Halkitis in acknowledgement of World AIDS Day. Dr. Halkitis is Professor of Applied Psychology, Global Public Health, and Population Health and Medicine at New York University; his talk happens at the Equality Center in downtown Tulsa, which is located at 621 East 4th Street. Dr.

"The Sexuality Spectrum" is a powerful and wide-ranging art exhibit now on view at the The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art in Tulsa, at 2021 East 71st Street, a facility whose mission is "to preserve and share the legacy of Jewish art, history and culture." This traveling exhibit runs through February, and it includes works across a range of media, all of them exploring sexual orientation and/or sexual identity. More than 50 international contemporary artists are featured, including Judy Chicago, Joan Snyder, Arthur Tress, Archie Rand, Albert Winn, Trix Rosen, and others.