Sociology

We've heard often about "essential workers" since the pandemic got underway -- those indispensable individuals who are, alas, in many cases under-appreciated, under-paid, or both. But such vital workers are not, of course, just those working in the medical, science, health, or rescue fields, and these workers were certainly an important part of American society **before** the pandemic ever hit. Our guest is the New York-based author and journalist Eyal Press.

The pandemic, of course, has clearly changed -- and is actually still changing -- how we think about work, play, relationships, entertainment, education, social interaction, and much more. It's also making many of us wonder about city life, i.e., what the pros and cons of living in an urban setting really are in this age of Covid. Are people still as drawn to cities as they used to be? And what does the future of the city look like? Our guest is David Cutler, the Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics at Harvard University.

Our guest is Adam Tooze, a professor of history at Columbia University and the author of "Crashed," which was a New York Times Notable Book of 2018 and one of The Economist's Books of the Year. His timely new book, which he tells us about, mixes finance, politics, business, economics, medicine, and recent world history in order to trace what went wrong -- and why -- during the turning-point year that was 2020. This new book is "Shutdown: How Covid Shook the World's Economy." As was noted by Reuters: "Tooze makes a strong case for looking back and beginning to draw some conclusions....

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Shankar Vedantam, the bestselling author and host of the popular "Hidden Brain" podcast and public-radio show. He joins us to discuss his book, "Useful Delusions: The Power and Paradox of the Self-Deceiving Brain." This book takes a detailed, research-driven look at the fundamental role of self-deception in human life -- that is, its positive as well as its negative aspects. As was noted by The Washington Post: "Powerful....

Everyday during our daily routine, we are "nudged" to make choices and decisions in a particular way. Most are beneficial to us, others, not. They range from our car reminding us to buckle up when we drive, to the ATM making us take our card back before dispensing cash, to our streaming services and e-commerce sites suggesting other items based on our previous history.

(Note: This conversation first aired back in April.) Our guest on StudioTulsa is Dr. Fern L. Johnson, a Senior Research Scholar and Professor Emerita at Clark University who focuses on race and culture. She and her partner, Marlene G.

Our guest is Dr. Christine Montross, who's an associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a practicing inpatient psychiatrist. She joins us to discuss her well-researched, quite unsettling new book, "Waiting for an Echo: The Madness of American Incarceration." As was noted of this volume in The New York Times Book Review: "A haunting and harrowing indictment of the deep psychological damage inflicted by the nation's punitive structures.... Montross is a gifted, often compelling storyteller....

(Note: This interview first aired back in March.) In the first two decades of the 21st century, New York City has experienced a terrorist attack, a blackout, a hurricane, an historic recession, widespread social injustice, and, of course, the COVID-19 pandemic. How has all of this affected the lives of New Yorkers? Our guest is the bestselling author Craig Taylor, whose book draws on years of interviews with hundreds of NYC residents in order to render an indelible group portrait of the city.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who's written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her latest book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Yes, the nation is deeply, counter-productively divided -- and yes, American politics and American culture probably haven't been this divided in decades.... But what can we DO about such polarization? Our guest is Peter T. Coleman, a professor of psychology and education at Columbia University, where he holds a joint appointment at Teachers College and the Earth Institute.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we discuss a work that takes a careful and long-overdue look at how caregiving and burnout so often go hand-in-hand in this country. Our guest is Kate Washington, an essayist, freelance writer, and food critic based in Northern California. Her new book, which she tells us about, is a memoir/report/study titled "Already Toast: Caregiving and Burnout in America." As was noted by Kirkus Reviews, this book is "a biting critique of how America is failing its unpaid caregivers....

Our guest is Shankar Vedantam, the bestselling author and host of the popular "Hidden Brain" podcast and public-radio show. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Useful Delusions: The Power and Paradox of the Self-Deceiving Brain." This book takes a detailed, research-driven look at the fundamental role of self-deception in human life -- that is, its positive as well as its negative aspects. As was noted of this work by The Washington Post: "Powerful....

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Dr. Fern L. Johnson, a Senior Research Scholar and Professor Emerita at Clark University who focuses on race and culture. She and her partner, Marlene G. Fine, are the white parents of African American sons, and they're also the co-authors of a new book, "Let's Talk Race: A Guide for White People." The book aims to provide personal insights as well as practical guidance -- along with ample research findings, prompts for personal reflection, a variety of race-oriented conversation-starters, and a useful list of "dos" and "don'ts."

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest is the writer Jeff Hobbs, whose latest book closely follows four Los Angeles high school boys as they apply to college. These four teens are seniors at two very different high schools in L.A. -- one in Compton, the other in Beverly Hills -- and by telling their individual, personal stories, Hobbs reveals what our nation's young people (across all socio-economic backgrounds) are now confronting at home, at school, among peers, and throughout society.

(Note: This interview first aired in September of 2020.) Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her latest book, which is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Our guest is the writer Jeff Hobbs, whose new book closely follows four Los Angeles high school boys as they apply to college. These four teens are seniors at two very different high schools in L.A. -- one in Compton, the other in Beverly Hills -- and by telling their individual, personal stories, Hobbs reveals what our nation's young people (across all socio-economic backgrounds) are now confronting at home, at school, among peers, and throughout society.

Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her newest book, which is just out in paperback; the book is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

Our guest is Dr. Syeachia Dennis, who joined the OU-Tulsa family medicine residency program in 2013, and who more recently completed a master's program from the John Hopkins School of Public Health. An Oklahoma native, Dr. Dennis is an Assistant Professor in the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine's Department of Family Medicine. She joins us for a candid, local-level discussion about the racial disparities that exist today in American health care: troubling, long-running disparities in access, treatment, perceptions, and outcomes. Dr.

Our guest is Terri White, who left her post as the Commissioner of Oklahoma's Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services earlier this year. A well-respected expert on, and advocate for, all matters of mental health, White had been appointed Commissioner in 2007; she originally joined the Department in 2001. White joins us to discuss her new post, which will be serving as the CEO of the vital statewide nonprofit, Mental Health Association Oklahoma, which is based in Tulsa. She'll replace Mike Brose, who led MHAOK for some 27 years.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we present our third and final health-related installment of the popular Life Kit podcast from NPR, which is an ongoing feature presenting useful "how to" tips to listeners on various aspects of daily living. Our own John Schumann co-hosted a trio of medical-based Life Kit podcasts which originally appeared earlier this summer, and those are the three episodes we're sharing on our program (last week, the week before last, and today).

Our guest is William Doyle, a bestselling author and TV producer for networks including HBO, The History Channel, and PBS. Doyle is the co-author of an important new education-focused study, which he tells us about. The book is called "Let the Children Play: How More Play Will Save Our Schools and Help Children Thrive." As was noted of this work by Michael Rich, an associate professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School: "Sahlberg and Doyle whack us in the head with the reality that 21st-century skills require old-fashioned learning as children.

When we refer to "implicit bias" in today's world, we mean those unconscious stereotypes or automatic assessments that we all make -- all of us -- about people of a race, color, or background that differs from our own. What happens when implicit bias occurs among doctors, nurses, or other medical experts? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Jabraan Pasha with the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, where he is Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine and Faculty Director of Student Recruitment. Dr.

Episode 7: Dr. Mike Troilo

Mar 21, 2019

Our guest is Dr. Mike Troilo, the Wellspring Associate Professor of International Business here at TU. He tells us how learning Korean -- which he began while taking karate lessons as a kid -- eventually led him to do graduate work in business administration and East Asian studies, which in turn led to his learning Mandarin Chinese. Dr. Troilo also describes his ongoing research into the policies as well as practices that can best foster entrepreneurship in a variety of nations, including China.

Our guest is Sarah Archer, a writer and curator who contributes to Slate, The Atlantic, Architectural Digest, and other publications. She tells us about her book, "Midcentury Christmas," which explores what Archer thinks of as the turning-point of Christmas in America -- i.e., the years just after WWII. This was an era when when new technologies, changing social and economic roles, and off-the-charts prosperity altered everything about American life -- including the Yuletide season.

On this edition of our program, we offer an engaging conversatiuon with Deborah Hunter, a Behavioral Health Rehab Specialist and Case Manager at Family & Children's Services here in Tulsa. She's been with F&CS since 2011, and she is also a longtime and award-winning poet. Interestingly, Hunter also works as a social worker for the Tulsa City-County Library, mainly at the TCCL's Central Branch (and 5th and Denver).

Our guest is Shane Bauer, a senior reporter for Mother Jones. He joins us to discuss a sobering new book that grew out of his outstanding reporting for that magazine.

(Note: This show first aired back in April.) Our guest is Bruce D. Haynes, a professor in the Department of Sociology at UC-Davis. He's the co-author of a new memoir, "Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family," which interestingly blends personal narrative, African-American social history, and the literary and academic cultures of Harlem and New York City.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Ruth Potee, who is both a Family Physician and an Addiction Medicine Physician based in Greenfield, Mass. She's also the Medical Director for the Franklin County House of Corrections, the Franklin Recovery and Treatment Center, and the Pioneer Valley Regional School District. As such, Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired in January.) For a number of different -- and often unsettling -- reasons, issues of race and racism have by now come into focus in American life in a pervasive manner that we, as a society, have not seen in decades. Or maybe, actually, we as a nation have never been as racially aware, or as racially alert, as we are at this moment. Thus we're discussing an important textbook in this regard; "Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice" first appeared back in the 1990s, and it has just been published in a new (fourth) edition.

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