Sports

Sports Parks Getting New Scoreboards

Jun 7, 2021

Some sports parks are getting new scoreboards.

Tulsa County Commissioner Stan Sallee says the county came to an agreement with company Youth Scoreboards.

“We struck an agreement that they would supply all the materials, the equipment, and put scoreboards in our fields at no cost to the county. It’s something that has an advertising element,” said Sallee.

Sallee said there are four new scoreboards in LaFortune Park now. The project may expand to O’Brien Park next.

This is an initiative that’s been tried in other towns.

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Tulsa’s pro soccer team will wear patches celebrating Greenwood’s history and future this season.

FC Tulsa announced Tuesday all its 2021 jerseys will feature the brand for Greenwood Ave., a project local artist Trey Thaxton created to highlight hundreds of Black Wall Street businesses. He redesigns early 20th Century businesses' signs and logos for apparel and art.

University of Tulsa

University of Tulsa linebacker Zaven Collins collected his latest award on Thursday.

In a private ceremony, Collins was presented with the Bronko Nagurski Trophy, the award given to college football’s best defensive player, judged by the Football Writers Association of America.

FWAA’s John Hoover told Collins the vote wasn’t even close, and not just because he made some game-changing interceptions, like a pick-six against Tulane to win the game in double overtime.

ORU men's basketball

Junior forward Kevin Obanor recorded a double-double Friday as the No. 15 Oral Roberts Golden Eagles knocked off the No. 2 Ohio State Buckeyes in overtime, 75–72.

Obanor scored 30 points and grabbed 11 rebounds in ORU’s first NCAA tournament win since 1974. With ORU trailing 64–62 with 15 seconds left in the second half, Obanor hit two free throws to tie the game.

Ohio State junior guard Duane Washington Jr. missed the game-winning jumper with three seconds left in regulation.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is journalist and author Larry Olmsted, who tells us about his latest book, "Fans: How Watching Sports Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Understanding." The book cites a wide range of new and recent studies on the topic of sports fandom, thus arguing that the more we root for a given sports team, the better our social, psychological, and physical health is likely to be -- and the more meaningful our personal relationships will be, and the more connected and happier we will feel overall.

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The PGA Championship is headed back to Southern Hills next year, the Oklahoma course that gets its eighth major championship earlier than expected after the PGA of America cut ties with former President Donald Trump.

In late 2015, Zac Easter, a young man from a small town in Iowa, took his own life. The reason? According to the many journals and detailed writings that Zac left behind, this act of suicide was chosen by Zac because he was unable to continue his long-running battle against worsening traumatic brain injuries -- injuries that stemmed directly from the fact that Zac had been a football player, from third grade through high school.

The pandemic-shortened Major League Baseball season will begin next week, on the 23rd -- and, looking on the bright side, **some** baseball this summer will be much better, of course, than **no** baseball this summer. In that spirit, we listen back to a fine StudioTulsa discussion from August of last year, when our guest was Gaylon White, a former sportswriter for the Denver Post, the Arizona Republic, and the Oklahoma Journal.

Our guest is Dr. Amir Hussain of Loyola Marymount University. He'll be speaking tomorrow night (Friday the 20th) at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa in connection with that museum's soon-to-close exhibit, "Wondrous Worlds: Art & Islam Through Time & Place." Dr. Hussain's remarks will be derived from his book, "Muslims and the Making of America," which explores everything from Muslims who fought in the Civil War to the cultural icon (and sports legend) Muhammad Ali.

Our guest is Gaylon White, who was a sportswriter for the Denver Post, the Arizona Republic, and the Oklahoma Journal before working in the corporate world for nearly forty years. He tells us about his new book, which is his third volume to focus on minor-league baseball. The book is "Left on Base in the Bush Leagues: Legends, Near Greats, and Unknowns in the Minors." As was noted of this work by a reviewer for Baseball Almanac: "Immerse yourself in the magic of being a bush league fan....

Episode 7: Dr. Mike Troilo

Mar 21, 2019

Our guest is Dr. Mike Troilo, the Wellspring Associate Professor of International Business here at TU. He tells us how learning Korean -- which he began while taking karate lessons as a kid -- eventually led him to do graduate work in business administration and East Asian studies, which in turn led to his learning Mandarin Chinese. Dr. Troilo also describes his ongoing research into the policies as well as practices that can best foster entrepreneurship in a variety of nations, including China.

Robin Lubbock / WBUR

The small Vermont town of Norwich (population 3,000 or so) has quite possibly produced more Olympic athletes per capita than any other location in the United States. How has this community done so? What's their secret? Our guest on ST, Karen Crouse -- a sportswriter who's been on the staff of The New York Times since 2005 -- set out to answer this question.

On this installment of our show, we chat with Aaron Sloan, who is the owner and head coach of The Engine Room, a gym based in Tulsa (with two different locations) which began as the Owasso Boxing Club in 2009. Aaron tells us about his Ready to Fight program, which he established just last year, as noted at the Engine Room website, "after a recently-diagnosed person with Parkinson's was referred to him by a doctor.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Brenda Tracy, a registered nurse who's based in Oregon. Tracy speaks often about sexual assault and physical violence on America's college campuses. In 1998, while she was a student at Oregon State, she was gang raped by four men -- two of whom were Oregon State football players. For many years afterward, as we learn on today's show, Tracy did not speak publicly about this devastating personal tragedy.

On this edition of ST -- with the Tour de France now in full swing -- we learn about both the origins and the development of the greatest race in all of cycling. Our guest is Peter Cossins, who's written about professional cycling since the early 1990s -- and who is a contributing editor at Procycling Magazine. His new book, just out, is called "The First Tour de France: Sixty Cyclists and Nineteen Days of Daring on the Road to Paris." As was noted of this book by a critic for Podium Cafe (a journal of cycling news, analysis, and opinion): "Essential....

On this edition of ST, a great discussion that first aired on our show in March. At that time we spoke with Aravind Adiga, who joined us to discuss his then-new novel, "Selection Day." As was noted by The New York Times of this fine coming-of-age saga that focuses on two brothers in a Mumbai slum who are raised to become cricket stars: "Mr. Adiga's third novel supplies further proof that his Booker Prize...was no fluke. He is not merely a confident storyteller but also a thinker, a skeptic, a wily entertainer, a thorn in the side of orthodoxy and cant....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about the Oklahoma Bike Summit 2017, which will happen later this week (the 19th and 20th) in Muskogee and Tahlequah -- and which will, per its website, focus "on attaining physical and mental well-being through bicycling. It will address bicycling for individuals with disabilities, as spiritual and emotional healing process, and to improve the health of a whole community." Our guest is Jayme Brown, who will give an address entitled "Ride to Recovery: Cycling as Rehabilitation" at this summit.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to an entertaining interview from November of last year. At that time, we spoke with journalist Ian Scheffler about his then-new book, "Cracking the Cube: Going Slow to Go Fast and Other Unexpected Turns in the World of Competitive Rubik's Cube Solving." As one Erno Rubik -- the inventor of the famous cube -- has noted of this book: "Scheffler provides the first comprehensive book on the global phenomenon of speedcubing. Much has changed since the first world championship was organized in Budapest in 1982.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, a discussion of the sport of rowing -- how it works, what its health and fitness benefits are, how it has developed as a competitive sport, and so on. Our guest is Micah Hartwell, a lecturer in the Dept. of Health & Human Performance at OSU Tulsa who's also the Nutrition Services Program Director for Tulsa CARES as well as the Varsity Men's Rowing Coach for the Tulsa Youth Rowing Association. As Hartwell tells us, this is a sport that draws upon all of one's muscle groups, and that one can safely practice throughout life.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Aravind Adiga, who won the Booker Prize for his novel, "The White Tiger." He joins us to discuss his newest book, just out, which is called "Selection Day." As was noted by The New York Times of this fine coming-of-age saga that focuses on two brothers in a Mumbai slum who are raised to become cricket stars: "Mr. Adiga's third novel supplies further proof that his Booker Prize...was no fluke. He is not merely a confident storyteller but also a thinker, a skeptic, a wily entertainer, a thorn in the side of orthodoxy and cant....

On this edition of ST, we speak with Lydia Reeder, a writer and editor based in Denver. She tells us about her now book, a popular history entitled "Dust Bowl Girls: The Inspiring Story of the Team That Barnstormed Its Way to Basketball Glory." It's the surprising but true Depression-era story of a women's basketball team -- the Oklahoma Presbyterian College Cardinals -- who came from Durant, and who were pretty much the best of the best in the early 1930s. The leader of this inspiring team, the visionary coach Sam Babb, is also profiled in Reeder's book -- and, indeed, Ms.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Ian Scheffler, who has written for The New Yorker, The Guardian, The Los Angeles Times, and The Los Angeles Review of Books. His first book, just out, is a nonfiction text called "Cracking the Cube: Going Slow to Go Fast and Other Unexpected Turns in the World of Competitive Rubik's Cube Solving." As one Erno Rubik -- the inventor of the famous cube -- has noted of this book: "Scheffler provides the first comprehensive book on the global phenomenon of speedcubing.

What, exactly, is a brain concussion? What causes one -- and what is happening to one's brain when a concussion occurs? Also, are concussions actually happening more often these days, or are medical and neurological professionals simply more sensitive to them -- or more aware of them? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Eric Sherburn, who is on the faculty of the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, where he serves in the Department of Family Medicine and Sports Medicine.

(Note: This interview first aired in early June.) "Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, routinely exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams.

On this installment of ST, a chat with the British scholar, journalist, and author David Goldblatt, whose new book -- arriving just in time for the Summer Games in Brazil -- is "The Games: A Global History of the Olympics." As was reecntly noted of this thorough and well-researched (and often quite opinionated) history of the modern Olympic games by a critic for the UK's Guardian newspaper: "Sport is many people's first exposure to international relations, and it's often not a bad primer on who's got a beef with whom.

"Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, tenacity, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.

Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest on this edition of ST is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.

Today's ST offers another discussion in our series of interviews with organizations aiming to acquire funding through the Vision 2025 sales tax extension for the City of Tulsa. Our guests, both members of TYPros, are two of the principals behind the much-talked-about proposal to create a Boston Avenue Multisport (or "BAM") Facility, which would exist between Boston and Cincinnati Avenues, and between 10th and 12th Streets, in downtown Tulsa: Terrell Hoagland is the Director of Sustainability for Jones Design Studio and Kenton Grant is the owner of Kenton Grant Consulting.

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak by phone with seven-time Olympic medalist and Oklahoma native Shannon Miller, who will give the keynote address at the 11th Annual Celebrating the Art of Healing Symposium here in Tulsa on Saturday, March 28th, at St. John Medical Center (near 19th and Utica). This symposium is free to the public, and it's open to cancer survivors as well as the families, friends, and medical professionals who care for them.

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