Storytelling

There are countless examples of writers using paintings or other visual art as inspiration to create entirely new work. Think "Girl with a Pearl Earring," "The Da Vinci Code," or even "Ode on a Grecian Urn" by John Keats. This is what the award-winning writer Donna Baier Stein did when she decided to write a new collection of short stories based on lithographs by iconic American artist Thomas Hart Benton. The issues that Benton dealt with and depicted throughout the Great Depression and afterward still resonate today.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Carol Haralson. A former citizen of Tulsa, she is an award-winning book designer now based in Arizona. She's designed several striking book jackets over the years, across a range of literary genres. And Haralson's now written a book of her own -- a blend of memoir, fiction, poetry, personal essay, and photography titled "At the Far End of O Street." She'll appear tomorrow night, Wednesday the 17th, at a free reading and signing at Magic City Books (beginning at 7pm).

Public radio is a beautiful thing.  It connects with the sights and sounds and people from around the world, it fills our cars and homes and sprits with music, it connects us with our community, and it can even be a reminder of home. 

One day last week, John Wooley, producer and host of Swing on Thisforwarded the Public Radio Tulsa staff an email from a listener who was travelling down the Amazon! The Amazon, how cool, is this?! 

Holiday Specials 2018

Dec 5, 2018

Join Public Radio Tulsa as the holidays approach for the music and stories of the season. We have yearly staples, along with a few new broadcasts and festive local programs! Bookmark our 2018 Holiday Guide, as below, so you won't miss a special! 

Hanukkah Ligths 2018
Wednesday, December 5 | 8:00 - 9:00 p.m.        
KWGS Public Radio 89.5 | LISTEN LIVE

NPR Staff

Recently, Public Radio Tulsa’s Steve Clem took a handful of classmates back to his grade school, Garfield Elementary in Sand Springs to talk about the seminal event of his childhood, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.   It happened 55 years ago this month.  From the same classroom where Steve and his fellow fourth-graders sat glued to the school’s black-and-white TV, they share their memories of that day and how it changed them.

A Creative and Subversive Act
By Rebecca Howard
Tulsa City-County Library

What is it about Shakespeare’s works that continue to inspire and captivate us? I recently attended a National Theater Live broadcast of the Chichester Festival Theatre’s production of King Lear staring Ian McKellen. In an interview airing before the broadcast, McKellen explained how every performance is different because “the audience writes the play.”

Our guest on ST is the best-selling and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Rick Bragg, who's known for his books "All Over but the Shoutin'" and "Ava's Man." His new book, which he tells us about, is "The Best Cook in the World." In this work, Bragg sets out to preserve his heritage as well as his family history by telling the stories that framed his mother's cooking, her upbringing, her education, her child-rearing, and so forth -- from her own childhood into old age. As Bragg tell us, in the American South just like everywhere else, good food always has a good story behind it.

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with Fran Stallings, a longtime storyteller who has performed at numerous national and international storytelling festivals, in schools and libraries, and on the radio. Stallings has two new books out, which she tells us about: "How to Fool a Cat: Japanese Folktales for Children" and "The Price of Three Stories: Rare Folktales from Japan." In each of these collections, Stallings has edited and adapted the stories of her friend and collaborator, Hiroko Fujita.

The StoryCorps Mobile Recording Booth has returned to Tulsa; it will be parked at the Guthrie Green in Downtown Tulsa from today (Thursday the 16th) through November 15th. How does it work, you ask? Well, people come in pairs to interview family members, friends, mentors, and loved ones; StoryCorps is all about everyday people sitting down together to ask or answer life's important questions. It's a vast and far-flung oral history project like no other; after all StoryCorps interviews are completed, the recordings are archived at the Library of Congress for generations to come.

Hemingway once noted: "There are two kinds of stories. The ones you live and the ones you make up. And nobody knows the difference. And I don't ever tell which is which." Great writers aren't the only ones who feel compelled to tell stories. It's something we all do. We have to. Doing so makes us human; sharing stories makes life easier, richer, more coherent, more meaningful. On this installment of ST, we learn about a story-driven event for the Tulsa community that's happening this weekend.