Syria

At a time when America's foreign service professionals are front and center in the national debate, we hear the story of four exemplary ambassadors from the State Department's Near East bureau.

Our guest is the former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Samantha Power, who's widely known as a tireless human-rights advocate. She joins us to discuss her recently published memoir, "The Education of an Idealist." Later this month, on Tuesday the 29th, Ambassador Power will take part in an onstage conversation (and subsequent book signing) with Dr. John Schumann, President of OU-Tulsa, at Congregation B'nai Emunah.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a broadcast from late February. At that time, our guest was psychologist and author Kenneth E. Miller, who has been working with war-affected communities since 1991 as a researcher, clinician, organizational consultant, and filmmaker.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, the Middle East...and how it got that way. We speak with former U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker, who was once called by President Obama -- when he was being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- "America’s Lawrence of Arabia." Ambassador Crocker was in the Foreign Service for 37 years and, after retiring, was recalled to active duty by President Obama in 2011 to serve as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. Previously, he did stints as the U.S. Ambassador to Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Lebanon.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Charles E. Ziegler, who is Professor of Political Science as well as Distinguished Research Scholar at the University of Louisville. He specializes on the domestic, foreign, and security policies of Russia and Eurasia, and he recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: The Rest Against the West?" Dr.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Blaise Misztal, the director of the National Security Program at the Bipartisan Policy Center, which is a Washington-based think tank aimed at developing principled, politically viable policy solutions. Over the years, Misztal has researched a variety national security issues, including U.S.-Turkey relations, Iran and its nuclear program, cybersecurity, stabilizing fragile states, and public diplomacy in the 21st century. He has published op-eds in The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, The New Republic, and elsewhere.

In the pre-9/11 past, threats to international security could usually be attributed to this or that "dangerous" or "unstable" nation-state. Today, however, such threats are quite often attributed not to nation-states, but to "non-state actors" like Boko Haram, Al-Qaeda, or the Islamic State (IS). We're speaking about this dramatic shift in thinking -- and in action, and in policy -- with Dr. Dan Caldwell, a professor of political science at Pepperdine University’s Seaver College. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Paul Conroy, a former British soldier who's worked as a photographer and filmmaker for more than a dozen years, and who's reported as a photojournalist on conflicts in Iraq, Congo, Kosovo, Libya, and Syria.