Terence Crutcher

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Several predominately white Tulsa churches have painted "Black Lives Matter" messages on their properties.

At least four churches painted their messages Wednesday, four years to the day after a white Tulsa police officer shot and killed Terence Crutcher, an unarmed Black man. More are expected to paint "Black Lives Matter" on their properties in the coming days.

Facebook / Governor Kevin Stitt

Oklahoma Rep. Regina Goodwin (D-Tulsa) said this week that she took two major exceptions with Gov. Kevin Stitt's Sunday roundtable discussion on race, put together in the wake of nationwide protests over police killings of Black Americans following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police last month.

With near-daily protests against police brutality and racism continuing across the country, the state, and the Tulsa area, Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum made clear to a national news outlet that he does not believe the 2016 killing of Terence Crutcher by the Tulsa Police Department was related to Crutcher being Black.

"A lot of people saw what happened to Terence Crutcher, and they said, 'This wouldn't have happened if he was a white man,'" reporter Kelefa Sanneh said to Bynum on a CBS Sunday Morning segment. "Do you think that's true?"

"No, I don't," Bynum responded. 

Black Wall Street Times

Hundreds of Tulsans participated in a local demonstration on Saturday calling for policing reform, joining protesters in cities across the U.S. speaking out against recent killings of black men and women by white men and police.

Organizers of the "We Can't Breathe" peaceful protest said the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd brought racism in America to the forefront and renewed the call for justice and true reform.