Trail of Tears

Photo of Claudio Saunt by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

Our guest is Claudio Saunt, a professor of American History at the University of Georgia. He'll soon deliver the 2021 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture at the University of Tulsa. His talk -- which will be offered as a digital/livestream/online-only event on March 4th (starting at 7pm) at utulsa.edu/cadenhead-settle -- will explore how slavery and indigenous dispossession effectively built the Antebellum South.

Photo From Wikipedia

Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a surprising 5-4 decision in the case of McGirt v. Oklahoma; the Court ruled that much of the eastern half of Oklahoma is still an Indian reservation. In doing so, the Court affirmed that -- because Congress had not expressly disestablished the Muskogee Creek Reservation, which was created well over a century ago -- that Reservation still exists when it comes to the Federal Major Crimes Act.

Our guest is David Treuer, an Ojibwe writer from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota, whose previous books include four novels and two books of nonfiction. He joins us to discusshis new book, a well-regarded historical study called "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present." As was noted of this work in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "An informed, moving, and kaleidoscopic portrait....

On this edition of ST, we welcome the award-winning Oklahoma writer Rilla Askew back to our show. Her new book, just out, is her first-ever nonfiction volume; it's a collection of nine linked essays entitled "Most American: Notes from a Wounded Place." In this timely and reflective work, she argues that the State of Oklahoma -- whether we are talking about police violence, gun culture, race relations, secret history, religious fervor, spellbinding landscapes, or brutal weather -- is actually a "microcosm" of the United States.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to great discussion from May of last year, when we spoke with Steve Inskeep, co-host of National Public Radio's Morning Edition.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion with Steve Inskeep, co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, which originally aired back in May. Inskeep tells us about his book, "Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "Inskeep [offers] a review of the forces and events leading to the expulsion of the Cherokees from their ancestral homelands.... In this lively narrative aimed at general readers, the author carefully avoids demonizing or patronizing his main characters.

Steve Inskeep, co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, is our guest today on StudioTulsa. He tells us all about his new book, "Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab." As the noted historian H.W. Brands has observed of this book: "History is complicated, and in its complications lies its appeal. Steve Inskeep understands this, and his elegantly twinned account of Andrew Jackson and John Ross shows just how complicated and appealing history can be.