Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations

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Our guest is Dr. Dan Caldwell, a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University. He recently gave a private, online-only address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (TCFR) on the topic of "What Would a Biden Foreign Policy Be?" Dr. Caldwell now helps to coordinate the campaign activities of a group of national security and foreign policy professionals who have endorsed Vice-President Biden in his bid for the White House. Over the years, Dr. Caldwell has taught at the Naval Postgraduate School, Stanford, UCLA, and Brown University.

We chat with Todd F. Buchwald, who served as Special Coordinator for the U.S. State Department's Office of Global Criminal Justice from December 2015 through July 2017, and was conferred the rank of Ambassador by President Obama in July 2016. Prior to this, Mr. Buchwald served as a lawyer in the State Department's Office of the Legal Adviser, including a stint as the Assistant Legal Adviser for Political-Military Affairs during the Clinton and Bush Administrations.

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Our guest is Dr. Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Professor at the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR) titled "The U.S. and the Middle East: Making Sense of Oil, Regime Change, and Forever Wars." Dr. Landis also writes "Syria Comment," a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts 100,000 readers per month -- and he often consults with U.S.

PHOTO BY EUROPEAN COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

The Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations recently presented an evening focused on Russia-China relations, and what the increasing ties between these two nations might mean for the United States. Our guest participated in that evening: Nina Rozhanovskaya has 7+ years of experience working on international academic projects and facilitating cooperation among Russian organizations and their overseas partners in a variety of areas. She is a coordinator and academic liaison for Kennan Institute in Russia.

Our guest is Klon Kitchen, who leads the tech policy initiative at the Heritage Foundation. He recently gave a talk titled "Disrupting National Security: The Growing Role of Big Tech in Geopolitics" at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR). At the Heritage Foundation, Kitchen heads an enterprise-wide, interdisciplinary effort to understand and shape our nation's most important technology issues.

Our guest is Tanvi Madan, a Senior Fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy in the Foreign Policy Program -- and also the Director of The India Project -- at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Her work centers upon India's role in the world and its foreign policy, focusing especially on the subcontinent's relations with China and the US. Madan recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, the title of which referred to Narendra Modi, who's been the Prime Minister of India since 2014.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization plays a much different role in the world today than it did when it was originally established in 1949. But what exactly is the role of NATO now? Our guest is Dr. Rajan Menon, Professor of International Relations at the City College of New York. He was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, where he spoke on "NATO Goes Global: A Look at the Record." Dr. Menon has been a Fellow at the Carnegie Council on Ethics in International Affairs and at the New America Foundation.

Our guest is James F. Hollifield, a Professor of Political Science and Academic Director of the Tower Center at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas, Texas; he's also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (TCFR) titled "Back to the Future: Trump's Migration Policies and the New Nativism." Dr.

Has the long-standing, bi-partisan, and rather rarified U.S. foreign policy establishment effectively failed our country? Yes, according to our guest today: Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago, and he's now a contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine. Walt's latest book is "The Hell of Good Intentions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S.

Has the Trump Administration strengthened our nation's position on the global stage -- or are we now, as a country, weaker in terms of international geopolitics? On this broadcast of ST, we welcome James Lindsay, Senior Vice President at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he oversees the work of the more than six dozen fellows in the David Rockefeller Studies Program. Lindsay is considered a leading authority on the American foreign policy-making process and on the domestic politics of U.S. foreign policy.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or NATO, is a multi-government military alliance between 29 North American and European countries. It began with 12 countries, and it will soon turn 70 years old. What is the future of NATO? (Especially at a time when the U.S. President has openly and publicly questioned the very importance of NATO....) What are NATO's main aims or goals -- and how have these changed over the years? Our guest on ST is Steven Hill, who was appointed the Legal Adviser and Director of the Office of Legal Affairs at NATO Headquarters in Brussels in February of 2014.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Ted Bromund, a Senior Research Fellow at The Heritage Foundation who specializes in Anglo-American relations, U.S. and British relations with Europe and the European Union, America’s leadership role in the world, and international organizations and treaties. A columnist for Newsday, Forbes, and Great Britain's Yorkshire Post, Bromund also writes regularly for National Review, The Weekly Standard, and FoxNews.com.

The earth's climate has warmed significantly since the late 19th century, and the activities of humankind -- primarily greenhouse-gas emissions -- are the main cause behind this warming. Such is the consensus view of the world's climate scientists. On today's ST, we explore the issue of climate change with a noted **political** scientist. Joshua Busby is an Associate Professor of Public Affairs and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

Beyond the series of conflicts that have stretched back decades in the Middle East, a new range of disputes, proxy wars, and conflicts have emerged in the region, all of which combine strategic and security concerns excacerbated by religious differences. Today Saudi Arabia and Iran are struggling for dominance in the region -- and this is playing out in ways ranging from extremist violence to civil war. 

Our guest is Wendy Sherman, a Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and a former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. Ambassador Sherman is also a Senior Fellow at Harvard's Belfer Center and is a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and the Aspen Strategy Group. She was also a Chief Negotiator for the Iran Nuclear Deal; her newly published memoir is called "Not for the Faint of Heart: Lessons in Courage, Power, and Persistence." She was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

What happens when one of the world's most oil-wealthy nations becomes a failed state? Our guest is Ambassador Patrick Duddy, the director of Duke University's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies who also teaches at the Sanford School of Public Policy. Before arriving at Duke, Ambassador Duddy served as a U.S. diplomat for nearly 30 years; upon his retirement, he was one of the State Department's most senior Latin American specialists.

Now that it's been a week since the unprecedented (and, by many accounts, quite surreal) summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un in Singapore, what are the main "takeaways" from that event? What did we learn? And what -- if anything -- did each individual actually gain or achieve? And what happens next? Our guest is Scott Snyder, a senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Since the end of World War II, the Atlantic Alliance between the countries of Western Europe and the United States has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Despite various strains over the years, my guest today has said: "We've always argued about the 'means,' not the 'ends,' of policy. Now we seem to want very different end results." He was referring in this comment to the Trump Administration's decision to withdraw from the Iranian nuclear deal, despite near-unanimous European opposition.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Ambassador Husain Haqqani, who served as Pakistan's ambassador to the United States from 2008 to 2011. Now working as a Hudson Institute Senior Fellow, where he is also the Director for South and Central Asia, Haqqani is widely credited with managing a difficult American-Pakistani partnership during a critical phase in the global war on terrorism. He has, moreover, served as an advisor to four different Pakistani Prime Ministers; he is also co-editor of the journal Current Trends in Islamist Ideology.

Our guest on ST is the Right Honourable Henry McLeish, a former professional football player, who began his political career in Fife, Scotland, in the early 1970s. He was later elected to the United Kingdom Parliament (in 1987) and then became a member of the Blair Government (in 1997). McLeish became First Minister of Scotland in 2000, taking responsibility for Scotland's emerging role on the European as well as the World stage, leading official government missions internationally, and implementing Scotland's social and economic policies.

Our guest on ST is David Shambaugh, the Director of the China Policy Program at George Washington University.

On this edition of ST, an in-depth chat about President Donald Trump and the Middle East. Our guest is Daniel Benaim, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (where he researches U.S. policy in the Middle East) as well as a visiting lecturer at New York University. He's also been a foreign-policy speechwriter at the White House, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Senate.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Joseph Cassidy, who is a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Previously, he was a longtime U.S. State Department diplomat, serving in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and South America. Cassidy is also, in the fall of 2017, acting as a Distinguished Visiting Fellow with the Center for International Business and Human Rights at the University of Oklahoma College of Law.

On this installment of ST, we're discussing the rampant, history-making corruption of recent years that has fostered -- and that continues to foster -- widespread change in Brazilian politics. Our guest is Paulo Sotero, the director of the Brazil Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. An award-winning journalist, Sotero was (from 1989 to 2006) the Washington correspondent for Estado de S.Paulo, a leading Brazilian daily newspaper.

President Trump recently announced a new approach -- a new strategy, basically -- for the U.S. Military in Afghanistan. How will this play out? Our guest on this installment of ST is Omar Samad, the former Afghan Ambassador to France (2009-11) and Canada (2004-09). Now working as a consultant in Virginia, Ambassador Samad has also been a Senior Afghan Expert at the United States Institute of Peace (2012-2013) as well as a Senior Central Asia Fellow at the New America Foundation (2013-14).

How, if at all, will the Israeli-Palenstinian conflict be affected by the Trump White House? Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa spoke on this topic last night at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR). Gershon Baskin is the founder of the Israel-Palestine Center for Research and Information, a joint public-policy think tank.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Ted Piccone, a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy as well as the Latin America Initiative at the Brookings Institution. His research is focused on global democracy and human rights policies, and he spoke recently at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations. Piccone is the author of "Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order," and his talk here in Tulsa was basically an extension of this book.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, the Middle East...and how it got that way. We speak with former U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker, who was once called by President Obama -- when he was being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- "America’s Lawrence of Arabia." Ambassador Crocker was in the Foreign Service for 37 years and, after retiring, was recalled to active duty by President Obama in 2011 to serve as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. Previously, he did stints as the U.S. Ambassador to Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Lebanon.

In late 2014, President Obama and Raúl Castro announced that the United States and Cuba would restore full diplomatic ties for the first time in more than 50 years. And late last month, of course, Fidel Castro died at age 90. So what happens next in U.S.-Cuban relations? Where do we go from here? Our guest on ST recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations that was focused on such questions. Ambassador Dennis K.

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