Tulsa Community College

Tulsa Community College is spending roughly $4 million in federal virus relief funds to pay off more than 5,000 students’ outstanding balances.

The institution is notifying current and former students enrolled on or after March 2020 that money they owed as of July 12, 2021, has been wiped out. A survey found about 40% of TCC students reported their financial situation has worsened during the pandemic, and a similar proportion is now struggling to pay for college.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Oklahoma U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe is requesting $866,000 in federal funding to help address a long-running nursing shortage in northeastern Oklahoma.

The earmark is for Tulsa Community College’s nursing program to purchase new equipment including patient simulators, renovate lab space and make other adjustments to accommodate 70 more students a year within four years, a 20% increase.

Oklahoma has four fewer nurses per capita than the national average, and TCC Nursing Program Director Lisa Gerow said the nurses the state does have are getting older.

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OSU-Tulsa and Tulsa Community College announced a new partnership Tuesday to help students earn their two- and four-year degrees in downtown Tulsa.

OSU-Tulsa President Dr. Pamela Fry said College Park builds on the two schools’ LinkeDegree program, which shows students how to get from TCC enrollment to an OSU bachelor’s degree.

"This is the difference between having a map to show how to reach a destination and having a navigator in the front seat with you making sure you don’t take the wrong turn," Fry said.

TCC

Tulsa Community College’s early college program is growing by two districts.

TCC has announced EDGE, which stands for “Earn a Degree, Graduate Early,” will be offered in Broken Arrow as well as Tulsa public schools in the fall. Eighth graders apply now for the program, in which students take college classes starting in 10th grade and earn an associate’s degree by the time they graduate from high school.

Courtesy Tulsa Community College

Citing a lower than average rate of bachelor's degree attainment for students who transfer from two-year to four-year colleges and universities, leaders of Tulsa-area institutions of higher education came together Tuesday to announce new transfer agreements in an attempt to help more students graduate.

"We can improve to be a better institution for transfer students, and that means TCC sending students to universities, and universities receiving Tulsa Community College students," said Dr. Leigh Goodson, TCC President.

Tulsa Community College announced on Tuesday a new endowed scholarship funded through its $20 million campaign to help students finish their degrees.

Former Tulsa Mayor Kathy Taylor and her family are supporting the Lola Catherine McGarvey Taylor Endowed Scholarship, named for her late mother and coinciding with what would have been her 100th birthday. Kathy Taylor said a college degree can make a huge difference in students’ and communities’ economic prospects.

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The U.S. Department of Education announced $14 billion in grants to colleges and universities across the country, including nearly $8 million for Tulsa Community College. According to college administrators, though, TCC is unsure when the funding will arrive — or exactly how it can be used.

"There is no set date for when it will be released," TCC general counsel Mackenzie Wilfong said at a virtual meeting of the college's Board of Regents on Thursday. "We are waiting with anticipation on being provided more guidance."

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Rubén Rengel, the 22-year-old Venezuelan violinist who won the 2018 Sphinx Competition, which is held annually for talented Black and Latino string players. Rengel will appear in Tulsa on Saturday night, the 16th, with the Signature Symphony at TCC. (More info and details on tickets are here.) On the program, Tchaikovsky's Concerto for Violin in D major, op. 35, which is a feature for Rengel, as well as Amy Beach's Symphony in E minor (a/k/a "the Gaelic").

Signature Symphony at Tulsa Community College is now celebrating, with the arrival of its 2018-19 season of concerts, forty years of entertaining Tulsa-area audiences. Our guest is Andres Franco, the Music Director for Signature Symphony, who also serves as Associate Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and Principal Conductor of Caminos del Inka. As Mr.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the remarkable ongoing work of one Father Patrick Desbois, a Catholic priest and Vatican consultant who's also the founder and president of Yahad-In Unum, an international organization that has thus far interviewed more than 5,300 eyewitnesses of Jewish and Roma executions by Nazi mobile units at more than 2,100 sites across Eastern Europe.

Tomorrow night, Saturday the 29th, the Downtown Tulsa campus of Tulsa Community College will host TEDxTulsaCC, a special gathering thus described at the TED website: "TEDxTulsaCC is a multi-sensory, multi-disciplinary event with a goal to bring Tulsa's best ideas to our community and the world. Attendees will experience enlightening talks, a shape-shifting art exhibition, the world premier of new choral work, surprise musical performances, and more.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Andrés Franco, the Music Director of the Signature Symphony at Tulsa Community College. Franco joins us to talk about the newly announced Pops and Classics concert series being presented by the Signature Symphony, and in particular the "Symphony of Tango" shows to be staged this weekend (on September 9th and 10th, at the VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education).

Questions of race and ethnicity are clearly at the heart of American politics -- and American culture, and American life -- in an all-encompassing way that we as a nation haven't seen since the Sixties. On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Shelly Tochluk, author of "Witnessing Whiteness: The Need to Talk About Race and How to Do It." It's a widely read book on contemporary US race relations, and one that Dr. Tochluk has spoken about -- and led workshops on -- here in Tulsa in the past.

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On this edition of ST, a discussion of business practices and sustainability goals in contemporary America -- and of where these two ideas do and don't (and might someday) overlap. Our guest is Bill Roth, a business-book author, green entrepreneur, and consultant on sustainability; he'll be speaking soon in our community.

Credit Matt Trotter / KWGS

On this edition of ST, we speak with two outstanding local citizens who were among the ten women recently given the Women of the Year - Pinnacle Award from the YWCA Tulsa collaboration with the Mayor'’s Commission on the Status of Women. Earlier this week, Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett presented these awards in person, and in doing so recognized how each of this year's recipients has worked to eliminate racism and/or empower women.

Today's ST offers another discussion in our series of interviews with organizations aiming to acquire funding through the Vision 2025 sales tax extension for the City of Tulsa. Our guests, both members of TYPros, are two of the principals behind the much-talked-about proposal to create a Boston Avenue Multisport (or "BAM") Facility, which would exist between Boston and Cincinnati Avenues, and between 10th and 12th Streets, in downtown Tulsa: Terrell Hoagland is the Director of Sustainability for Jones Design Studio and Kenton Grant is the owner of Kenton Grant Consulting.

On this installment of ST, an interesting conversation with Anne Sarah Rubin, an associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who is also the author of "Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and American Memory." This book explores the stories as well as the myths about Sherman's infamous March to the Sea.