Unions / Organized Labor

We've heard often about "essential workers" since the pandemic got underway -- those indispensable individuals who are, alas, in many cases under-appreciated, under-paid, or both. But such vital workers are not, of course, just those working in the medical, science, health, or rescue fields, and these workers were certainly an important part of American society **before** the pandemic ever hit. Our guest is the New York-based author and journalist Eyal Press.

On this edition of ST, we welcome writer Connie Cronley back to our program. She's one of our regular commentators; her previous books include "Sometimes a Wheel Falls Off," "Light and Variable," "Poke a Stick at It," and "Mr. Ambassador: Warrior for Peace." Cronley joins us to discuss her latest book, "A Life on Fire," which is a fascinating new biography of Kate Barnard (1875-1930).

Here in the good ol' USA, a strong work ethic -- a drive to succeed through hard work -- is seen as a leading virtue, and indeed, as a necessity. We Americans have long been told that financial success and personal well-being will undoubtedly follow if we adopt a highly motivated mindset toward our job. On today's edition of ST, we look at the origins of that "highly motivated" outlook. Our guest is David Gray, a teaching professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

According an article published in The Washington Post yesterday, workers in Amazon warehouses are injured at nearly double the rate as workers in other warehouse jobs. The Strategic Organizing Center, a coalition of labor unions, contributed data to the article and says Tulsa also has a high injury rate.

 

KWGS’s Elizabeth Caldwell spoke to Eric Frumin, SOC’s health and safety director, about why Amazon has such high injury rates. He started off the conversation saying that Amazon has a digital discipline system he thinks pushes people too hard. 

 

Oklahoma Watch

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A union complaint about whether an Oklahoma meatpacking plant is doing enough to protect workers from the coronavirus could test the industry’s response to the pandemic because Seaboard Foods says it is following recommendations from the government and trade groups. 

The International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW)

A major labor union has weighed in on the lease showdown between Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum and the IC Bus manufacturing plant.

In a statement from their president, Rory Gamble, the United Auto Workers said that the 1,600 workers at the plant "deserve better than the risky behavior that what [sic] we're currently seeing," and accused Bynum of using the workers as "bargaining chips."

(Please Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is Bryce Hoffman, a bestselling author, speaker, and consultant who helps companies plan better and leaders lead better by applying systems from the worlds of business and the military. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Red Teaming: How Your Business Can Conquer the Competition by Challenging Everything." What is "red teaming," you ask?

On this installment of ST, an interesting chat with Rick Wartzman, who is the director of the Moon Center for a Functioning Society at the Drucker Institute, which is a part of Claremont Graduate University. Wartzman also writes about work and working for Fortune Magazine's website, and he joins us to discuss his new book, "The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America." This book, which Forbes called "a brilliant, rogue history of American business's transformation over the past 75 years," shows us how and why four major U.S.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with two University of Tulsa faculty members about an exciting Woody Guthrie symposium -- entitled "Standing at the Crossroads of American Cultural Life" -- that will happen at TU's Lorton Performance Center on Saturday the 30th. Our guests are Dr. Randall Fuller, the Chapman Professor of English, and Dr. Brian Hosmer, the Barnard Associate Professor of Western American History.

Organized labor, generally speaking, has had a tough time of it in our country over the last several decades; from coast to coast, for many reasons, professional unions have been minimized, marginalized, disrespected, demonized, etc. But has this also been the case for today's professional musicians? Our guest is Raymond Hair, Jr., the President of the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada (or AFM). This labor union, founded in 1896, is the largest organization in the world representing the interests of professional musicians.