The University of Tulsa

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Why do some kids -- but not all kids -- develop imaginary friends? And how exactly do kids benefit from their relationships with imaginary companions? What do they acquire from these relationships? Our guest is Tracy Gleason, a developmental psychologist and professor of psychology at Wellesley College. She will speak about her interesting research on young children's imaginary companions at 7pm on Thursday the 27th in TU's Tyrrell Hall.

Our guest is Susan Neal, Executive Director of Gilcrease Museum, which recently announced that its current facility will be not just refurbished or remodeled but, indeed, entirely rebuilt. The museum announced over the weekend that its current building will be demolished, and that a new structure will be erected in its place. As Neal expalins, Gilcrease has been added to -- and/or expanded upon -- several times over the years. The oldest parts of the museum date back to 1913; the newest building in the Gilcrease complex dates from the 1980s.

Our guest is Dr. Grant Jenkins, Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa. He teaches creative writing as well as modern and contemporary U.S. literature, with a specialty in experimental poetry and poetics. Dr. Jenkins has just published his first novel, which he tells us about. "Ivory Tower" is an engrossing, genre-hopping crime thriller, set mainly on an American university campus. It's about a film professor who sets out to uncover sexual corruption within her school's football program. Please note that Dr.

On this final installment in our Found@TU podcast series, which has explored all manner of faculty research being done here at the University, we welcome Dr. Kristen Tegtmeier Oertel, the Mary Frances Barnard Professor of 19th Century American History. She describes her research on slavery and abolition, especially in relation to race and gender. Growing up on the Kansas/Missouri border, as it turns out, led Dr. Oertel to explore how Native Americans, African-Americans, and women shaped the politics of that region during the Civil War.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we revisit our fascinating 2017 conversation with David Grann, the bestselling author and staff writer at The New Yorker Magazine. At that time, Grann was promoting his then-new book, "Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI" (which has been optioned for a much-talked-about film version). Grann will deliver a free-to-the-public Presidential Lecture here at TU on Tuesday the 22nd; his talk begins at 7:30pm in the Reynolds Center.

Our guest is Eric Foner, the DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University, who is a Pulitzer Prize–winning scholar and one of the most prominent historians in the United States. He'll give the free-to-the-public 23rd Annual John W. Hager Distinguished Lecture at the TU College of Law (at 3120 East 4th Place) on October 17th. (The reception for this event is at 5:30pm; the lecture begins at 6pm.) Prof.

Next week here at TU -- on October 11th, in a free-to-the-public event at the Lorton Performance Center -- the University's College of Engineering and Natural Sciences will present energy and power-system expert Robert Bryce, who will give the 2019 Hulings Lecture. This lecture will be followed by a screening of Bryce's film, "Juice: How Electricity Explains the World." (More on this event is posted here.) Bryce is our guest today.

On this edition of Found@TU, which is our monthly interview podcast series in which University of Tulsa faculty discuss their research and why it matters, our guest is Dr. Elana Newman. She is the McFarlin Professor of Psychology and Research Director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, and she joins us to discuss her in-depth research on journalism and trauma. Dr.

We're pleased to present a new Found@TU podcast. Found@TU is a monthly series from Public Radio Tulsa in which University of Tulsa faculty (from an array of academic disciplines) talk about their research in a clear, fresh, and engaging manner. This time out, our guest is Dr. Andrew Grant Wood, the Stanley Rutland Professor of American History here at TU. He discusses his wide-ranging research on Mexican society and culture -- and you can access this free, on-demand podcast here.

Rhythm Atlas

Tune in to The Rhythm Atlas, hosted by Denis McGilvray, on Sunday, June 9th for a special Dylan Around the World show. Inspired by the inaugural World of Bob Dylan Symposium hosted by The University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies and the Bob Dylan Archive, this program will feature the songs of Bob Dylan as covered by artists from all over the globe. You’ll hear performers from France, the British Isles, Jamaica, India, South Africa, Turkey, and more.

Rhythm Atlas

Tune in to The Rhythm Atlas, hosted by Denis McGilvray, on Sunday, June 9th for a special Dylan Around the World show. Inspired by the inaugural World of Bob Dylan Symposium hosted by The University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies and the Bob Dylan Archive, this program will feature the songs of Bob Dylan as covered by artists from all over the globe.

Our guest for this installment of Found@TU is Dr. Erin Iski, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry here at the University of Tulsa. She describes her research in nanoscale surface chemistry, in which she uses an innovative Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) to study the interaction of atoms and molecules on surfaces. Dr.

We at KWGS are pleased to post a new episode in our monthly Found@TU podcast series, in which various University of Tulsa faculty members discuss their research in a clear, accessible, and engaging manner. Our guest this time around is Dr. Akhilesh Bajaj, the Chapman Professor of Computer Information Systems here at TU, who talks with us about his research on the advantages and disadvantages of customizing (rather than using off-the-shelf) information systems in an organization.

Our guest is Dr. Akhilesh Bajaj, the Chapman Professor of Computer Information Systems here at TU, who talks with us about his research on the advantages and disadvantages of customizing (rather than using off-the-shelf) information systems in an organization. He also outlines the recent history of office automation, explains what blockchains are, and describes how artificial intelligence is poised to (fairly soon!) transform the world. For more about Dr. Bajaj’s research, please visit abajaj.net.

Our guest is Dr. Mike Troilo, the Wellspring Associate Professor of International Business here at TU. He tells us how learning Korean -- which he began while taking karate lessons as a kid -- eventually led him to do graduate work in business administration and East Asian studies, which in turn led to his learning Mandarin Chinese. Dr. Troilo also describes his ongoing research into the policies as well as practices that can best foster entrepreneurship in a variety of nations, including China.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Our guest is John Brennan, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from 2013 to 2017. Previously a deputy national security advisor and assistant to President Barack Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Brennan today speaks to various audiences about how to both think of and respond to global events, terrorism, and cybersecurity concerns.

Gilcrease Museum

Our guest is Susan Neal, the executive director of Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. It was recently announced that Gilcrease is now gathering applications from architectural firms seeking to execute the renovation, redesign, and expansion of the museum.

Our guest is Dr. Jeff Alderman, Associate Professor of Community Medicine and director of TU's Institute for Healthcare Delivery Systems. He speaks with us about how palliative medicine alleviates suffering by offering humanistic, person-centered (and sometimes home-based) care. We discuss the value and challenges of this form of medical treatment, as well as ways to improve the health care system so that it can deliver better, safer, and less expensive care.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a remarkable and newly launched exhibit at Gilcrease, "Americans All!" This show, which is ongoing, is (per the Gilcrease website) the museum's "latest exhibition drawn from [its] permanent collection...[and it] showcases the many positive contributions immigrants have made, and continue to make, to American life and culture.

Our guest is Janna Levin, the noted scientist and author who's also a Guggenheim Fellow and a professor of physics and astronomy at Columbia University's Barnard College. On Tuesday night, October 2nd, she will deliver a University of Tulsa Presidential Lecture at 7:30pm in the TU Reynolds Center. Levin's latest book, now out in paperback, is "Black Hole Blues" -- and she'll draw from this book (musing on everything from the characteristics of black holes to the ageless union of art and science to the very nature of reality) when she gives her free-to-the-public talk at TU.

On this edition of our show, we learn all about Kendall Whittier, Incorporated, or KWI, which is a neighborhood-minded and long-running nonprofit now marking its 50th Anniversary. KWI is, per its website, "a home-grown organization incorporating self-sufficiency for our neighbors through food security, nutritional health, and well-being." KWI -- the only food pantry in the Tulsa area that actually delivers to its participants' doorsteps -- will host an event tonight (Thursday the 7th) in celebartion of its Golden Anniversary.

Live on Classical Tulsa: The Catalyst Quartet

May 11, 2018
The Catalyst Quartet: violinists Karla Donehew Perez and Jessie Montgomery, cellist Karlos Rodriguez and violist Paul Laraia
Frank Christel

This week, the Catalyst Quartet was in town to perform for all of the fourth graders in the Tulsa Public Schools as part of Chamber Music Tulsa's contribution to the Any Given Child program.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, our guest is the well-regarded cyber security expert, Susan Landau of Tufts University. She will soon give the 2018 Graves Cyber Security Distinguished Lecture here at TU; her talk begins at 7pm tomorrow night (the 8th) in the Alan Chapman Student Union. Her talk carries the same title as her latest book, "Listening In: Cyber Security in an Insecure Age." As Prof.

The University and Free Speech
A Panel Discussion moderated by TU President Gerard Clancy
March 8, 2018
Chapman Lecture Hall
7:00 p.m.

On this broadcast of ST, we chat with Laura Skoch, a Visiting Faculty Member with the Theatre Department here at The University of Tulsa. She's directing the new TU Theatre production of George Orwell's "1984," which opens tonight (the 22nd) in Kendall Hall on the TU campus and runs through the 25th. As Skoch relates during our interview, this decidedly multi-media play, like Orwell's classic novel, is mainly about how people seek out both meaning and hope in a world of lies, suppression, fear, and distortion.

Public Radio Tulsa

Sexual violence against women is not new. But the conversation about it is starting to change.  And the #MeToo movement has reflected thousands, or millions, more stories of personal pain and humiliation.

We took the conversation local. Listen to the full recording HERE.

Sexual violence against women is not new. But the conversation about it is starting to change.  And the #MeToo movement has reflected thousands, or millions, more stories of personal pain and humiliation. We’re taking the conversation local.

On this edition of our show, we learn about "Eloquent Craftsman: Tom Manhart and His Students," a new exhibition focusing on the artwork and teaching career of Thomas A. Manhart, a thoughtful and influential sculptor who was a much-admired professor of art at TU from 1963 to 1993.

In 1959, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote an autobiographical article for Ebony Magazine called "My Trip to the Land of Gandhi." The peaceful paths that these two great men traveled were at times quite different, and at times quite similar.

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