US Military

(Please note: This edition of ST Medical Monday originally aired back in January.) Today we offer a conversation with two community leaders who are both involved with the Tulsa Community Service Council, and who are both, moreover, U.S. Military veterans: Dr. Erv Janssen and Jim Lyall. They join us to define and discuss the experience known as moral injury -- an affliction that's similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, yet which also differs from PTSD in several important ways.

Our guest is Elliot Ackerman, the author of several widely-acclaimed novels who's also a former Marine; he served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Ackerman joins us to discuss his new book, a collection of autobiographical essays called "Places and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning." Per a starred review of this volume in Booklist: "[A] searing, contemplative, and unforgettable memoir-in-essays....

On this edition of ST, we listen back to our discussion with the bestselling historian Nathaniel Philbrick about his book, "In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at  Yorktown." We spoke with him last year, when the book first came out; it's now appearing in a paperback edition. As was noted by The Wall Street Journal: "[Philbrick], an accomplished popular historian...excels when writing about sailors and the ocean. He vividly renders the interplay of skill and chaos in naval combat by massive fleets, as well as the fury of hurricanes....

Has the long-standing, bi-partisan, and rather rarified U.S. foreign policy establishment effectively failed our country? Yes, according to our guest today: Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago, and he's now a contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine. Walt's latest book is "The Hell of Good Intentions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S.

On this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a timely conversation with two community leaders who are both involved with the Tulsa Community Service Council, and who are both, moreover, U.S. Military veterans: Dr. Erv Janssen and Jim Lyall. They join us to define and discuss the experience known as moral injury -- an affliction that's similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, yet which also differs from PTSD in several important ways.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Ambassador Husain Haqqani, who served as Pakistan's ambassador to the United States from 2008 to 2011. Now working as a Hudson Institute Senior Fellow, where he is also the Director for South and Central Asia, Haqqani is widely credited with managing a difficult American-Pakistani partnership during a critical phase in the global war on terrorism. He has, moreover, served as an advisor to four different Pakistani Prime Ministers; he is also co-editor of the journal Current Trends in Islamist Ideology.

(Please Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is Bryce Hoffman, a bestselling author, speaker, and consultant who helps companies plan better and leaders lead better by applying systems from the worlds of business and the military. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Red Teaming: How Your Business Can Conquer the Competition by Challenging Everything." What is "red teaming," you ask?

President Trump recently announced a new approach -- a new strategy, basically -- for the U.S. Military in Afghanistan. How will this play out? Our guest on this installment of ST is Omar Samad, the former Afghan Ambassador to France (2009-11) and Canada (2004-09). Now working as a consultant in Virginia, Ambassador Samad has also been a Senior Afghan Expert at the United States Institute of Peace (2012-2013) as well as a Senior Central Asia Fellow at the New America Foundation (2013-14).

Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

Our guest is Bryce Hoffman, a bestselling author, speaker, and consultant who helps companies plan better and leaders lead better by applying systems from the worlds of business and the military. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Red Teaming: How Your Business Can Conquer the Competition by Challenging Everything." What is "red teaming," you ask?

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about the Oklahoma Bike Summit 2017, which will happen later this week (the 19th and 20th) in Muskogee and Tahlequah -- and which will, per its website, focus "on attaining physical and mental well-being through bicycling. It will address bicycling for individuals with disabilities, as spiritual and emotional healing process, and to improve the health of a whole community." Our guest is Jayme Brown, who will give an address entitled "Ride to Recovery: Cycling as Rehabilitation" at this summit.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, the Middle East...and how it got that way. We speak with former U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker, who was once called by President Obama -- when he was being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- "America’s Lawrence of Arabia." Ambassador Crocker was in the Foreign Service for 37 years and, after retiring, was recalled to active duty by President Obama in 2011 to serve as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. Previously, he did stints as the U.S. Ambassador to Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Lebanon.

In late 2014, President Obama and Raúl Castro announced that the United States and Cuba would restore full diplomatic ties for the first time in more than 50 years. And late last month, of course, Fidel Castro died at age 90. So what happens next in U.S.-Cuban relations? Where do we go from here? Our guest on ST recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations that was focused on such questions. Ambassador Dennis K.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the author Peter Cozzens, who has written several acclaimed books on the Civil War and the American West. He chats with us about his newest book, which is just out: "The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West." Per Douglas Brinkley, writing for The New York Times Book Review, this book is "a detailed recounting of random carnage, bodies burned, treaties broken, and treachery let loose across the land.... Cozzens admirably succeeds in framing the Indian Wars with acute historical accuracy....

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Charles E. Ziegler, who is Professor of Political Science as well as Distinguished Research Scholar at the University of Louisville. He specializes on the domestic, foreign, and security policies of Russia and Eurasia, and he recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled "Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: The Rest Against the West?" Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the author, scholar, and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, who grew up in rural Oklahoma and is now based in San Francisco. She is the daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother, and she's been active in the international Indigenous People's Movement for more than four decades.

"Into the Sun: A Novel"

Oct 24, 2016

Our guest on this edition of ST is Deni Ellis Béchard, whose previous books includethe novel "Vandal Love" and the memoir "Cures for Hunger." He joins us to discuss his new book, a novel called "Into the Sun." This book explores, as a critic for Kirkus Reviews noted, "how living in Afghanistan profoundly affected a group of friends.

On this edition of our program, we speak with Phil Klay, a writer and veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps whose 2014 short-story collection, "Redeployment," won the National Book Award for Fiction. Klay will appear in our community soon as part of a "Creative Writing Celebration" being presented by TU's newly established Creative Writing segment within the Department of English.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the filmmaker Kyle Ham, who grew up in Tulsa before studying theatre and film at DePauw University. Ham has a new movie out, his first feature, which he actually co-wrote with his former professor from DePauw University, playwright Steve Timm. That film is "Reparation" -- it's an award-winning independent motion picture about a troubled Air Force veteran who searches for clues to his lost memories in his daughter's artwork.

(Note: This interview first aired in early June.) "Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, routinely exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with John Kael Weston, who represented the United States for more than a decade as a State Department official. Weston has a new book out -- part memoir, part critique, part military history, and part geo-political reportage -- which he discusses with us today. It's called  "The Mirror Test: America at War in Iraq and Afghanistan." As was noted by The Washington Post: "As a former Foreign Service officer, Weston is perfectly positioned to provide a different perspective on these wars' sometimes-particular complexities....

"Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, tenacity, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams.

Our guest on StudioTulsa today is the three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, author, and military historian Rick Atkinson, who is the recipient of this year's Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award. (This prize is awarded annually by the Tulsa Library Trust.) Atkinson grew up a self-described "military brat" and began his writing career as a newspaper reporter in Pittsburgh, Kansas, and today he's perhaps best known for his bestselling "Liberation Trilogy" about the U.S. Army's role in the liberation of Europe during World War II.

On this edition of ST, we speak with P.W. Singer, who is a strategist and senior fellow at the New America Foundation; the founder of NeoLuddite, a technology advisory firm; and the author of several award-winning books. Singer is widely considered a leading expert on trends and tactics in 21st-century warfare, and he'll be giving a free-to-the-public lecture tonight (Tuesday the 29th) on the TU campus. The talk is entitled "Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know," and it begins at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall.

The folks who bring you StudioTulsa have been on summer holiday for the first half of August.

Here's a guide to the programs that we aired on ST on July 31st as well as August 3rd through the 7th, along with audio links (in case you'd like to hear any of these programs as a free, on-demand mp3 stream).

Friday, July 31st -- We spoke with Terrie Correll, CEO of the Tulsa Zoo; you can hear that conversation here:

We also featured a commentary during our 7-31-15 show by Janet Pearson; it concerned Oklahoma travel and tourism and can be heard here:

On this installment of ST, on the eve of the Fourth of July, we replay an interview from last year with the Denver-based journalist and nonfiction author Helen Thorpe, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and elsewhere. Thorpe's first book, 2009's widely acclaimed "Just Like Us," tellingly profiled the lives of three young Latinas living in the United States.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

Our guest is the film historian and journalist Mark Harris, who's written for Entertainment Weekly, Grantland, New York Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Brian Katulis, a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, where his work focuses on U.S. national security policy in the Middle East and South Asia. Katulis -- who recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, and who spoke with us while he was in town -- has served as a consultant to numerous U.S. government agencies, private corporations, and non-governmental organizations on projects in more than two dozen countries, including Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, Egypt, and Colombia.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the noted Denver-based journalist and nonfiction author Helen Thorpe, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and elsewhere. Thorpe's first book, 2009's widely acclaimed "Just Like Us," tellingly profiled the lives of three young Latinas living in the United States. Her newly published second book, "Soldier Girls: The Battles of Three Women at Home and at War," takes a close look at three female veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

Pages